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Classics

Classical Civilization

CLCV V3101x The Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Nubia 3 pts. Thanks to the pyramids of Giza, the treasure of Tutankhamun, and other remains of royal activity, pharaonic Egypt is justly famous for its monuments and material culture. Equally fascinating, if less well known, however, are the towns, fortresses, cultic centers, domestic spaces, and non-elite cemeteries that have been excavated over the past 200 years or so. The archaeology of Nubia is also little known but fascinating on many levels. This course will focus on what archaeology can reveal about life as it was experienced by individuals of all social classes. Through a combination of broad surveys and case studies of some of Egypt and Nubia's most culturally indicative and intriguing sites, we will explore issues such as the origins of inequality, state formation and its effects, the uneasy mix of state-planned settlements and village life, urbanism, domestic and community worship, gendered spaces, ethnicity and colonialism, religious revolution and evolution, bureaucracy, private enterprise, and the effects of governmental collapse on life and death in ancient Egypt and Nubia.

CLCV V3158x Women in Antiquity 3 pts. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None. Examines the role of women in ancient Greek and Latin literature; the portrayal of women in literature as opposed to their actual social status; male and female in ancient Mediterranean cosmologies; readings from ancient epics, lyric drama, history, historical documents, medical texts, oratory, and philosophy, as well as from contemporary sociological and anthropological works that help to analyze the origins of the Western attitude toward women.

CLCV V3162x Ancient Law 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015.

CLCV V3205y Classics in the 20th and 21st Centuries 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015.

CLCV V3230y Classics and Film 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Considers cinematic representations of the ancient Mediterranean world, from early silent films to movies from the present day. Explores films that purport to represent historical events (such as Gladiator) and cinematic versions of ancient texts (Pasolini's Medea). Readings include ancient literature and modern criticism.

CLCV V3535x Identity and Society in Ancient Egypt 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015.

Open only to students enrolled in the post-baccalaureate certificate program in Classics.

LATN W3908x The Post-Baccalaureate Seminar 3 pts. This seminar aims to provide students in the post-baccalaureate certificate program with opportunities 1) to (re-)familiarize themselves with a selection of major texts from classical antiquity, which will be read in English, 2) to become acquainted with scholarship on these texts and with scholarly writing in general, 3) to write analytically about these texts and the interpretations posed about them in contemporary scholarship, and 4) to read in the original language selected passages of one of the texts in small tutorial groups, which will meet every week for an additional hour with members of the faculty.

ANCS V3995x The Major Seminar 3 pts. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Required for the Ancient Studies major. The topic changes from year to year but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major. Past topics include: love, dining, slavery, space, power.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANCS V3995
ANCS
3995
28764
001
Th 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
M. Folch 1 [ More Info ]

CLCV W4110y Gender and Sexuality In Ancient Greece 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. Examination of the ways in which gender and sexuality are constructed in ancient Greek society and represented in literature and art, with attention to scientific theory, ritual practice, and philosophical speculation. Topics include conceptions of the body, erotic and homoerotic literature and practice, legal constraints, pornography, rape, and prostitution.

CLCV W4145x Ancient Political Theory 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. An examination of ancient political theory in its social and philosophical context. Topics will include constitutional theory, the origins and legitimation of government, ethics and politics, the regulation of private life, the rule of law, and the cosmopolis. Authors will include the Sophists, Plato (Republic, Laws, Statesman), Aristotle (Politics), Cicero (Republic and Laws), Polybius, Dio of Prusa (On Kingship, Borysthenic Oration), and Augustine (City of God).

CLCV W4190y (Section 01) Virtue and Happiness: Philosophy in Classical Rome 3 pts. This class provides an introduction to philosophical texts and practices of Rome's classical era (1st century BC to 2nd century AD). Why study Roman philosophy? While Romans in the early and middle Republic seem to have been satisfied with the moral code inherited from their ancestors (known as the mos maiorum), from the time of Cicero until the high Empire, Roman intellectuals wrestled with the problem of combining these traditional values with the range of philosophical texts and practices they encountered in the contemporary Greek world. Even though few ancient Romans qualify as original philosophical thinkers, philosophy played an important role in Roman culture, and knowledge of philosophical discourses is thus indispensable to our understanding of Roman society, history, and literature. Furthermore, owing to the vagaries of textual transmission, the majority of our sources for Hellenistic philosophy (most notably, Epicureanism and Stoicism) happen to be Roman, with the result that this important chapter of the history of philosophy cannot be studied without detailed attention to the Roman material. And finally, philosophical texts account for some of the most important and attractive works of Latin-and indeed world-literature. Readings will be in English translation and include works by Lucretius, Cicero, Horace, Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, and others.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: CLCV W4190
CLCV
4190
13527
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
609 HAMILTON HALL
K. Volk 18 [ More Info ]

CLCV G6066x (Section 01) Ancient Cities: Urbanism in the Near Eastern and Mediterranean World 3 pts. In this seminar we will explore a wide variety of ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean cities, as well as the theoretical frameworks that inform their development, growth, and contraction over time. Cities thrive for different reasons; some are grounded on trade and markets, others on sacred centers or military bases, while others are fashioned as if from scratch to fit a particular political ideology. In addition to reading texts focussing on specific cities and on overarching issues, each of you will develop an expertise on one particular city and will examine issues of broad interest as they are manifest in that city. Such issues include city-planning vs. organic growth, the position of the city within a general settlement pattern, its relationship to its hinterland, its political status, neighborhoods, ethnic enclaves, slums, topography, landscape, markets, industry, temples, palaces, memorials, and arenas to showcase political, sacred, and spectacular performance.

Classical Literature

CLLT V3132y (Section 01) Classical Myth 3 pts. A survey of major myths from the ancient Near East to the advent of Christianity, with emphasis on the content and treatment of myth in classical authors: Aeschylus, Euripides, Hesiod, Homer, Livy, Ovid, Sophocles, Vergil.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: CLLT V3132
CLLT
3132
04399
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
323 MILBANK HALL
H. Foley 48 [ More Info ]

CLLT V3135y Ancient Novel 3 pts. Survey of major works of ancient prose fiction dating to the 1st-3rd c. CE, including Petronius' Satyricon and Longus' Daphnis and Chloë, in conjunction with ancient religious and philosophical texts and selected works of modern fiction.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CLLT V3135
CLLT
3135
11720
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
E. Scharffenberger 5 [ More Info ]

CLLT V3140x Comedy Past and Present 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Ancient Greek and Roman comedies are studied along with their modern English counterparts, as we explore how fantasy and satire have been developed as tools for grappling with political, social and cultural issues. Authors may include Aristophanes, Petronius, Lucian, Apuleius, Seneca, Tom Stoppard, Thomas Pynchon, Douglas Adams and John Waters.

CLLT V3185x From Augustine to Abelard 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. The proposed course, Medieval Latin Literature: From Augustine to Abelard, aims to provide undergraduate students with an introduction to the literature of the Latin Middle ages in translation. It will include all the important literary genres within the varieties of Latin which we call Medieval Latin, both in verse and prose. The course will emphasize those types of literary compositions that are newly created within the context of medieval culture, such as monastic rules, Christian hymns, biblical exegesis, hagiography and devotional literature. The readings will emphasize both continuity with the literary traditions of ancient Rome as found in these texts, but also the integration of biblical narratives and hermeneutics into the written culture of medieval Europe. Also included among the primary sources will be medieval discussions of literary theory.

CLLT W4115y Tragedy and Performance 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. An intensive study of problems relating to the interpretation and performance of Greek and Roman tragedy, including modern stage versions. Special consideration is given to staging, the changing role of actors and the chorus, Aristotle's Poetics, and the reception of ancient tragedy, as well as social and philosophical issues, including gender conflict.

CLLT W4300x The Classical Tradition 3 pts. Overview of Greek and Roman literature. Close analysis of selected texts from the major genres accompanied by lectures on literary history. Topics include the context out of which the genres arose, the suitability of various modern critical approaches to the ancient texts, the problem of translation, and the transmission of the classical authors and their influence on modern literature.

Greek

GREK V1101x Elementary Greek I 4 pts. For students who have never studied Greek. An intensive study of grammar with reading and writing of simple Attic prose.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1101
GREK
1101
65467
001
MWF 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
E. Rudoni 1 [ More Info ]
GREK
1101
24276
002
MW 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
S. Oppen 6 [ More Info ]

GREK V1102y Elementary Greek II 4 pts. Prerequisites: GREK V1101 or the equivalent, or the permission of the instructor or the director of undergraduate studies. Continuation of grammar study begun in GREK V1101; selections from Attic prose.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: GREK V1102
GREK
1102
22607
001
MW 6:10p - 8:00p
616 HAMILTON HALL
U. Poole 7 / 18 [ More Info ]
GREK
1102
63256
002
MW 6:10p - 8:00p
318 HAMILTON HALL
C. Charles 13 / 18 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1102
GREK
1102
17200
001
TuTh 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
S. McVane 1 [ More Info ]

GREK V1121x and y Intensive Elementary Greek 4 pts. Covers all of Greek grammar and syntax in one term. Prepares the student to enter second-year Greek (GREK V1201 or V1202).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1121
GREK
1121
74226
001
MWF 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 1 [ More Info ]

GREK V1201x Intermediate Greek I 4 pts. Prerequisites: GREK V1101-1102 or the equivalent. Selections form Attic prose.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: GREK V1201
GREK
1201
60624
001
MWF 10:10a - 11:25a
207 MILBANK HALL
C. Charles 5 / 18 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1201
GREK
1201
08819
001
MW 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
N. Worman 12 / 25 [ More Info ]

GREK V1202y Selections from Homer 4 pts. Prerequisites: GREK V1101-V1102 or GREK V1121 or the equivalent. Detailed grammatical and literary study of several books of the Iliad and introduction to the techniques or oral poetry, to the Homeric hexameter, and to the historical background of Homer.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: GREK V1202
GREK
1202
77193
001
MWF 11:40a - 12:55p
315 HAMILTON HALL
M. Fantuzzi 6 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1202
GREK
1202
12196
001
TuThF 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
D. Steiner 3 [ More Info ]

GREK V3015x Philo of Alexandria: Historical Essays and the Contemplative Life We will read in the original language selections from three treatises -- In Flaccum, Legatio ad Gaium, and De Vita Contemplativa -- of Philo of Alexandria; aside from their importance as Imperial Greek texts, these essays provide essential and very rare evidence for the environment (early Imperial Alexandria) and thought of their author.

GREK V3309x Selections from Greek Lit: Herodotus 3 pts. Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V3309
GREK
3309
02073
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
H. Foley 5 [ More Info ]

GREK V3310y Selections from Greek Literature II: Greek Orators 3 pts. Prerequisites: GREK V1201-V1202 or the equivalent. Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit. Topic for 2006-2007: Aristophanes

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: GREK V3310
GREK
3310
09944
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
237 MILBANK HALL
N. Worman 11 [ More Info ]

Open only to students enrolled in the post-baccalaureate certificate program in Classics.

GREK W3980x The Post-Baccalaureate Seminar 3 pts. This seminar aims to provide students in the post-baccalaureate certificate program with opportunities 1) to (re-)familiarize themselves with a selection of major texts from classical antiquity, which will be read in English, 2) to become acquainted with scholarship on these texts and with scholarly writing in general, 3) to write analytically about these texts and the interpretations posed about them in contemporary scholarship, and 4) to read in the original language selected passages of one of the texts in small tutorial groups, which will meet every week for an additional hour with members of the faculty.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK W3980
GREK
3980
27499
001
F 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
E. Scharffenberger 1 [ More Info ]

GREK V3996x The Major Seminar 3 pts. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Required for all majors in classics and classical studies. The topic changes from year to year but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major. Past topics include: love, dining, slavery, space, power.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V3996
GREK
3996
75041
001
Th 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
M. Folch 2 [ More Info ]

GREK V3997x and y Directed Readings 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the director of undergraduate studies. A program of reading in Greek literature, to be tested by a series of short papers, one long paper, or an oral or written examination.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: GREK V3997
GREK
3997
95999
001
TBA M. Folch 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3997
98699
002
TBA C. Franklin 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3997
74796
003
TBA J. Howley 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3997
77539
004
TBA M. Fantuzzi 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3997
01639
005
TBA K. Milnor 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3997
27005
007
TBA E. Scharffenberger 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3997
27652
008
TBA S. Schwartz 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3997
88966
009
TBA D. Steiner 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3997
19710
010
TBA K. Volk 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3997
88967
011
TBA G. Williams 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3997
06323
012
TBA N. Worman 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3997
09443
013
TBA H. Foley 5 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V3997
GREK
3997
07842
006
TBA K. Milnor 0 [ More Info ]

GREK V3998x and y Supervised Research 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the director of undergraduate studies. A program of research in Greek literature. Research paper required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: GREK V3998
GREK
3998
78454
001
TBA M. Folch 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3998
95957
002
TBA C. Franklin 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3998
11036
003
TBA J. Howley 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3998
05025
004
TBA H. Foley 1 [ More Info ]
GREK
3998
07205
005
TBA K. Milnor 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3998
92055
006
TBA W. Harris 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3998
25556
007
TBA E. Scharffenberger 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3998
63470
008
TBA S. Schwartz 1 [ More Info ]
GREK
3998
27783
009
TBA D. Steiner 1 [ More Info ]
GREK
3998
17755
010
TBA K. Volk 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3998
20974
011
TBA G. Williams 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
3998
05109
012
TBA N. Worman 1 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V3998
GREK
3998
03482
012
TBA N. Worman 0 [ More Info ]

GREK W4009x Sophocles 3 pts. Prerequisites: GREK V1201 and V1202 or their equivalent. Since the content of the course changes from year to year, it may be taken in consecutive years.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK W4009
GREK
4009
28477
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
M. Folch 2 [ More Info ]

GREK W4010y (Section 01) Selections from Greek Literature: Greek Lyric 3 pts. Prerequisites: GREK V1201-V1202 or the equivalent. Since the content of this course changes each year, it may be repeated for credit.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: GREK W4010
GREK
4010
91796
001
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
607 HAMILTON HALL
D. Steiner 8 [ More Info ]

GREK W4105x History of Greek Literature I 4 pts. Prerequisites: At least two terms of Greek at the 3000 level or higher. Readings in Greek literature from Homer to the 4th century B.C.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK W4105
GREK
4105
23384
001
TuTh 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
D. Steiner 1 [ More Info ]

GREK W4106y History of Greek Literature II 4 pts. Prerequisites: At least two terms of Greek at the 3000 level or higher. Greek literature of the 4th century B.C. and of the Hellenistic and Imperial Ages.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: GREK W4106
GREK
4106
72967
001
MW 11:00a - 12:50p
617B HAMILTON HALL
M. Folch 7 [ More Info ]

GREK W4139y Elements of Prose Style 3 pts. Prerequisites: At least four terms of Greek, or the equivalent. An intensive review of Greek syntax with translation of English sentences and paragraphs into Attic Greek.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: GREK W4139
GREK
4139
67901
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
613 HAMILTON HALL
E. Scharffenberger 13 [ More Info ]

Latin

LATN V1101x and y Elementary Latin I 4 pts. For students who have never studied Latin. An intensive study of grammar with reading of simple prose and poetry.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: LATN V1101
LATN
1101
16551
001
MWF 11:40a - 12:55p
613 HAMILTON HALL
C. Catenaccio 9 / 20 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1101
LATN
1101
63988
001
TuThF 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 5 [ More Info ]
LATN
1101
16318
002
MW 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
A. Conser 3 [ More Info ]
LATN
1101
27544
003
MW 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
A. Simone 5 / 20 [ More Info ]

LATN V1102x and y Elementary Latin II 4 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V1101 A continuation of LATN V1101, including a review of grammar and syntax for students whose study of Latin has been interrupted.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: LATN V1102
LATN
1102
67933
001
TuThF 9:10a - 10:25a
609 HAMILTON HALL
S. Oppen 6 / 20 [ More Info ]
LATN
1102
21107
002
TuTh 6:10p - 8:00p
616 HAMILTON HALL
E. Rudoni 14 / 20 [ More Info ]
LATN
1102
27447
003
MW 4:10p - 6:00p
609 HAMILTON HALL
N. Rynearson 12 / 20 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1102
LATN
1102
65450
001
TBA Instructor To Be Announced 4 [ More Info ]

LATN V1120x Preparation for Intermediate Latin 4 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. A one-term intensive review of the basic grammar and reading skills; designed for students who have had some Latin in the past but need further instruction to qualify for LATN V1201.

LATN V1121x and y Intensive Elementary Latin 4 pts. Designed to cover all of Latin grammar and syntax in one semester in order to prepare the student to enter LATN V1201 or V1202.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: LATN V1121
LATN
1121
11897
001
MWF 9:00a - 10:15a
617B HAMILTON HALL
J. Howley 10 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1121
LATN
1121
70513
001
MWF 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 3 [ More Info ]

LATN V1201x and y Intermediate Latin I 4 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V1101-V1102, or LATN V1121, or the equivalent. Selections from Catullus and from Cicero or Caesar.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: LATN V1201
LATN
1201
26477
001
MWF 11:40a - 12:55p
607 HAMILTON HALL
C. Charles 16 / 25 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1201
LATN
1201
11376
001
MWF 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
E. Jewell 4 [ More Info ]
LATN
1201
62697
002
MW 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
U. Poole 10 [ More Info ]

LATN V1202x and y Intermediate Latin II 4 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V1201 or the equivalent. Selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses and from Sallust, Livy, Seneca, or Pliny.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: LATN V1202
LATN
1202
26739
001
TuThF 11:40a - 12:55p
609 HAMILTON HALL
C. Franklin 17 / 25 [ More Info ]
LATN
1202
17570
002
TuTh 6:10p - 8:00p
609 HAMILTON HALL
K. Brassel 16 / 25 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1202
LATN
1202
17833
001
TuTh 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
Z. Herz 11 [ More Info ]

LATN V3012x Augustan Poetry 3 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V1202 or the equivalent. Selections from Vergil and Horace. Combines literary analysis with work in grammar and metrics.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3012
LATN
3012
26170
001
MW 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
G. Williams 23 [ More Info ]

LATN V3033x Medieval Language and Literature 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: Four semesters of college Latin or permission of the instructor. This survey focuses on translation, grammatical analysis, and discussion of the literary and cultural contexts of medieval Latin prose and poetry. It includes widely read texts by major authors (e.g. Augustin, Boethius, Abelard and Heloise, Bernard of Clairvaux, Petrarch) as well as lesser-known anonymous pieces (e.g. love lyric from the Cambridge Songs and the Carmina Burana, poetic satire from a rotulus, and a novel, the Historia Apollonii).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3033
LATN
3033
72558
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
C. Franklin 3 [ More Info ]

LATN V3309x Latin Literature Selections: The Roman Novel 3 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V3012 or the equivalent. Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3309
LATN
3309
10999
001
TBA Instructor To Be Announced 2 [ More Info ]

LATN V3310y Selections from Latin Literature: Roman Elegy/Ovid 3 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V3012 or the equivalent. Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: LATN V3310
LATN
3310
95996
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
607 HAMILTON HALL
G. Williams 20 [ More Info ]

LATN V3996x The Major Seminar 3 pts. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Required for all majors in Classics and Classical Studies. The topic changes from year to year but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major. Past topics include: love, dining, slavery, space, power.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3996
LATN
3996
12543
001
Th 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
M. Folch 7 [ More Info ]

LATN V3997x and y Directed Readings in Latin Literature 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the director of undergraduate studies. A program of reading in Latin literature, to be tested by a series of short papers, one long paper, or an oral or written examination.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: LATN V3997
LATN
3997
65942
001
TBA M. Folch 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3997
17753
002
TBA C. Franklin 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3997
18351
003
TBA J. Howley 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3997
20797
004
TBA J. Zetzel 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3997
04631
005
TBA K. Milnor 2 [ More Info ]
LATN
3997
60860
007
TBA E. Scharffenberger 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3997
67258
008
TBA S. Schwartz 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3997
67748
009
TBA D. Steiner 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3997
68248
010
TBA K. Volk 1 [ More Info ]
LATN
3997
70796
011
TBA G. Williams 3 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3997
LATN
3997
08335
012
TBA N. Worman 0 [ More Info ]

LATN V3998x and y Supervised Research in Latin Literature 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the director of undergraduate studies. A program of research in Latin literature. Research paper required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: LATN V3998
LATN
3998
71452
001
TBA M. Folch 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
72298
002
TBA C. Franklin 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
73749
003
TBA J. Howley 2 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
92109
004
TBA J. Zetzel 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
99798
005
TBA D. Steiner 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
82248
006
TBA W. Harris 1 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
96356
007
TBA E. Scharffenberger 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
96897
008
TBA S. Schwartz 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
01387
009
TBA H. Foley 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
03205
010
TBA K. Milnor 0 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
18451
011
TBA K. Volk 1 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
11452
012
TBA G. Williams 3 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
04519
013
TBA N. Worman 0 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3998
LATN
3998
04109
006
TBA K. Milnor 1 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
05301
012
TBA N. Worman 0 [ More Info ]

LATN W4009x Selections from Latin Literature: Roman Comedy 3 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V3012 or the equivalent. Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN W4009
LATN
4009
15398
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
G. Williams 3 [ More Info ]

LATN W4010y Selections from Latin Literature 3 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V3012 or the equivalent. Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit. Topic for 2007-2007: Elegy

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: LATN W4010
LATN
4010
08709
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
237 MILBANK HALL
K. Milnor 7 [ More Info ]

LATN W4105x Latin Literature of the Republic 4 pts. Prerequisites: At least two terms of Latin at the 3000 level or higher. Latin literature from the beginning to early Augustan times.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN W4105
LATN
4105
17345
001
MW 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
K. Volk 3 [ More Info ]

LATN W4106y Latin Literature of the Empire 4 pts. Prerequisites: At least two terms of Latin at the 3000 level or higher. Latin literature from Augustus to 600 C.E.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: LATN W4106
LATN
4106
20630
001
MW 4:10p - 6:00p
607 HAMILTON HALL
J. Zetzel 16 [ More Info ]

LATN W4139x Elements of Prose Style 3 pts. Prerequisites: At least four semesters of Latin, or the equivalent. Intensive review of Latin syntax with translation of English sentences and paragraphs into Latin.

LATN W4140y Latin Stylistics 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: LATN W4139 or the equivalent The study of the development of Latin prose style through practice in composition.

LATN W4152y (Section 01) Medieval Latin Literature: The Fathers and The Bible 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. The Fathers and the Bible. A survey of early medieval biblical hermeneutics from the patristic age to Bede. The course will include both the theory of biblical interpretation (and especially its relation to classical grammar and rhetoric and to the debate about translation), as well as its literary practice. Readings from the works of Augustine, Jerome, Bede, Avitus, Proba, and others.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: LATN W4152
LATN
4152
11738
001
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
406 HAMILTON HALL
C. Franklin 6 [ More Info ]

LATN W4160y Latin Language, Culture, and Identity in Ancient Rome 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: LATN 3012 or equivalent. An introduction to the Latin language: linguistic analysis of morphology and phonology combined with exploration of its cultural significance as an artificial construct. Topics to be considered will include: the struggle over 'Latinity' in the first century BCE; the problem of 'vulgar Latin'; the role of the grammarian as guarantor of social order; archaism and linguistic innovation.

Modern Greek

GRKM V1101x Elementary Modern Greek I 4 pts. This is the first semester of a year-long course designed for students wishing to learn Greek as it is written and spoken in Greece today. As well as learning the skills necessary to read texts of moderate difficulty and converse on a wide range of topics, students explore Modern Greece's cultural landscape from "parea" to poetry to politics. Special attention will be paid to Greek New York. How do "our," "American," "Greek-American" definitions of language and culture differ from "their", "Greek" ones?

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GRKM V1101
GRKM
1101
24240
001
TuTh 9:00a - 10:50a
TBA
F 10:00a - 10:50a
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 2 [ More Info ]

GRKM V1102y Elementary Modern Greek 4 pts. Prerequisites: GRKM V1101 or the equivalent. Continuation of GRKM V1101. Introduction to modern Greek language and culture. Emphasis on speaking, writing, basic grammar, syntax and cross-cultural analysis.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: GRKM V1102
GRKM
1102
75326
001
TuTh 9:00a - 10:50a
617B HAMILTON HALL
F 10:00a - 10:50a
616 HAMILTON HALL
K. Van Dyck 4 / 20 [ More Info ]

GRKM V1201x Intermediate Modern Greek I 4 pts. Prerequisites: GRKM V1101-V1102 or the equivalent. Corequisites: Students are also required to take the conversation class, GRKM W1211. This course is designed for students who are already familiar with the basic grammar and syntax of modern Greek language and can communicate at an elementary level. Using films, newspapers, and popular songs, students engage the finer points of Greek grammar and syntax and enrich their vocabulary. Emphasis is given to writing, whether in the form of film and book reviews or essays on particular topics taken from a selection of second year textbooks.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GRKM V1201
GRKM
1201
25430
001
TuTh 12:10p - 2:00p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 1 [ More Info ]

GRKM V1202y Intermediate Modern Greek II 4 pts. Prerequisites: GRKM V1201 or the equivalent. Continuation of GRKM V1201. Students complete their knowledge of the fundamentals of Greek grammar and syntax while continuing to enrich their vocabulary.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: GRKM V1202
GRKM
1202
69154
001
TuTh 11:00a - 12:50p
616 HAMILTON HALL
T. Lee 5 / 20 [ More Info ]

GRKM W1211x Intermediate Modern Greek Conversation 1 pt. For students in GRKM V1201, but also open to students not enrolled in GRKM V1201, who wish to improve their spoken Modern Greek. For more information, contact Prof. Vangelis Calotychos at ec2268@columbia.edu.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GRKM W1211
GRKM
1211
76197
001
F 11:00a - 11:50a
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 1 [ More Info ]

GRKM V3135y Topics Through Greek Film 3 pts. This course addresses a wide range of fields from film theory and aesthetics to cultural studies and history, exploring questions of film style, transnational and cosmopolitan filmmaking practices, national industries and audience reception. We will begin by discussing recent debates in film studies about transnational and peripheral cinemas before proceeding to the case of films that are either produced in Greece or are about Greece. We will read films in terms of their narrative style, locate them in their wider socio-political and economic contexts of production and reception, and suggest other case studies based on your own background and interests. Films have English subtitles. There will be an optional 1-credit bilingual section for those students able to read and discuss materials in Greek.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: GRKM V3135
GRKM
3135
61210
001
Tu 7:30p - 9:30p
613 HAMILTON HALL
E. Basea 6 [ More Info ]

GRKM V3306x The Making of Modern Greek Poetry 3-4 pts. This course is given with a 1 pt. bilingual option (1 hr. per week) for those students who have the skills to discuss the material in Greek.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: GRKM V1201 or the equivalent. In this course, we read back and forth through Greek literary history from the 1980s to the 1930s, 1920s, 1880s and 1820s, mapping contemporary critical concerns and contemporary literary works onto earlier works, as well as examining how previous generations of writers influence contemporary writers. We will focus on questions of women's writing, gender and sexuality, as well as how translation conceals and reveals these questions. Texts include works by Anghelaki-Rooke, Cavafy, Dimoula, Elytes, Laina, Mastoraki, Ritsos, Sachtouris, Seferis, Sikelianos and Solomos. This method of reading back and forth not only highlights what is linguistically familiar about contemporary writing and more foreign about earlier writing, but makes questions of canon formation and literature as a national institution integral to the process of studying Modern Greek poetry. Students will create portfolios of their own translations of the poems we read and discuss them with poets and translators over the course of the semester. No knowledge of Greek is necessary, although an extra-credit tutorial will be offered for Greek speakers wishing to read the poetry in the original. Class discussion and texts will be in English. Works also available in Greek for those students wishing to read in Greek. Assignments may be completed in English or Greek.

GRKM V3308y Athens 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Introduces students to important discussions about culture and society in contemporary Greece. Examines the themes of gender, family, kinship, ethnicity, friendship, national identity and diaspora, individuality and community, class, and citizenship. Readings include essays by distinguished contemporary Greek scholars and are intended to offer students a comprehensive perspective of contemporary Greek cultural criticism.

GRKM V3400y Diaspora & Translation 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. This course introduces students to the rich tradition of literature about and by Greeks in America over the past century, exploring questions of ethnic identity, gender and language. Students examine how contemporary debates in diaspora studies and translation theory can inform each other and how both, in turn, can inform a discussion of the writing of the Greek American experience in histories, novels, poetry, travel literature, performance art and films. Authors include Kazan, Gage, Broumas, Spanidou, Galas, Selz, Papandreou, and Petrakis.

CLGM V3920y The World Responds to the Greeks: Greece Faces East 3 pts. This course is an antidote to Contemporary Civilization and Literature Humanities, considering the real, imagined, and forgotten ways that "Greece" was connected to the "East", from antiquity to the present, rather than the ways Greek culture and thought paved the way to "Western Civilization". Using a range of disciplinary lenses -- including but not limited to history, literary criticism, anthropology, and art history -- we will read and discuss primary source materials that connect Ancient/Byzantine/Modern Greek cultural, economic, and political actors with, for instance, Phoenician, Persian, Arab, Turkish, Ottoman civilizations as well as cultures and peoples of the "Modern Middle East". The course fulfills the Global Core requirement.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: CLGM V3920
CLGM
3920
76276
001
Tu 1:00p - 2:50p
307 UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
C. Philliou 18 [ More Info ]

CLGM W3937x The Culture of Democracy 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. The point is to examine democracy, not as political system, but as a historical phenomenon characterized by a specific culture: a body of ideas and values, stories and myths. This culture is not homogenous; it has a variety of historical manifestations through the ages but remains nonetheless cohesive. The objective is twofold: 1) to determine which elements in democratic culture remain current, no matter what form they take in various historical instances; 2) to understand that the culture of democracy is indeed not abstract and transcendental but historical, with its central impetus being the interrogation and transformation of society.

GRKM V3997x and y Directed Readings 1-4 pts. Designed for undergraduates who want to do directed reading in a period or on a topic not covered in the curriculum.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: GRKM V3997
GRKM
3997
11464
001
TBA S. Gourgouris 0 [ More Info ]
GRKM
3997
87647
002
TBA K. Van Dyck 1 [ More Info ]

GRKM V3998x and y Senior Research Seminar 1-4 pts. Designed for students writing a senior thesis or doing advanced research on Greek or Greek Diaspora topics.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2014 :: GRKM V3998
GRKM
3998
89538
001
Th 12:10p - 2:00p
617B HAMILTON HALL
E. Calotychos 4 [ More Info ]
GRKM
3998
81749
002
TBA S. Gourgouris 0 [ More Info ]
GRKM
3998
86252
003
TBA K. Van Dyck 0 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: GRKM V3998
GRKM
3998
10709
001
TBA S. Gourgouris 0 [ More Info ]

GRKM W4250y The Greek Islands 1600-present 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: GRKM V1201-GRKM V1202 or permission of the instructor Texts in Greek and English. Selective survey of key literary texts from Crete, the Ionian Isles, the Cyclades, and the Dodecannese as well as western texts about these topoi. Sometime island paradises and retreats; othertimes sites of political internment or occupation, texts will be read in historical specificity, in linguistic, cultural, political, utopic terms. Texts will include selections from Kornaros's Erotokritos, Jesuit Cycladic theater, folksongs, Solomos, Papadiamantis, Theotokis, Venezis, Elytis, Ritsos, Karapanou as well as some Greek and foreign contemporary films.

CLGM W4290 (Section 001) GREECE AT THE CROSSROADS 4 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. This course introduces students to key aspects of Modern Greek culture as well as to faculty at Columbia working on Greece in different departments. Readings focus on moments when Greece's position at the crossroads between East and West become comparatively relevant to particular disciplines. Students study works by poets, novelists, filmmakers, literary critics, historians, anthropologists and architects; Columbia faculty and invited guests then discuss their own scholarship in these fields. Texts are available in both English and Greek. The course can be taken with a one-credit extra hour tutorial for advanced students reading materials in Greek.

GRKM W4300x (Section 01) Worlding Cavafy: Desire & Media 4 pts. C. P. Cavafy, a poet of the Greek Diaspora in Alexandria, had a profound influence on writers such as E.M. Forster, Marguerite Yourcenar, and James Merrill as well as artists such David Hockney and Duane Michaels. By examining Cavafy's work in all its permutations (as criticism, translation, adaptation), this course introduces students to a wide range of critical approaches used in Comparative Literature, Gender Studies, and Translation Studies. The Cavafy case becomes an experimental ground for different kinds of critical methods, those that engage social-historical issues such as sexuality, diaspora, postcoloniality as well as linguistic issues such as multilingualism, translation and media. How does this poet "at a slight angle to the universe" challenge contemporary theories of gender and literature as national institution? How can studying a canonical author open up our theories and practices of translation? To what extent are translations and adaptations hermeneutic acts? What do they tell us about the receiving culture as well as the source culture? What will our own translation project be? Though this course presupposes no knowledge of Greek, students wanting to read Cavafy in the original are encouraged to take the 1-credit directed reading tutorial offered simultaneously.

CLGM W4390 (Section 001) THE POLITICS OF POIEIN: GREEK 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. This course stages an imaginary dialogue between certain Greek poets, whose work spans the 20th century, and poets of the same era from other parts of the world, for whom Greek motifs are crucial to their poetic sensibility. These motifs may pertain to both ancient and modern figures of Hellenism, but even when the figures are recognizably ancient the assumption is that they extend themselves to an outmaneuverable modernity. Indeed, by staging this dialogue, the course will engage in interrogations of modernity and, moreover, the specific ways in which figures of modernity and figures of Hellenism are entwined. At the same time, we will pay close attention to different articulations of poi?sis, especially as they pertain to a certain politics. The literary historical sphere spans the range of early modernism to postmodernism and postcolonialism, as well as specific poetic-political sensibilities, whether aestheticist or Marxist, feminist or queer.

GRKM G4420 Greece and Turkey: Literature and Politics 3-4 pts. The relationship between Greece and Turkey, as well as between Greeks and Turks (and Cypriots), has traditionally been considered one of animosity and mistrust. This perspective falls short of capturing the complexities of a long history of encounters -- literary, cultural, linguistic, political, musical, architectural -- in a variety of contexts -- Byzantine, Ottoman, colonial (e.g. Cyprus), national, transnational. This course will consider the nature of these contracts in their literary and cultural representation, their wider rhetorics and fundamental (meta)narratives in the modern period. All texts available in English translation. Though this course presupposes no knowledge of Greek, students wanting to read in the original are encouraged to take the 1-credit tutorial offered simultaneously through the Program in Hellenic Studies.


Of Related Interest

Art History and Archaeology

V3248 Greek Art and Architecture

H3320 Medieval Art and Architecture

Political Science

W4133 Political Thought - Classical and Medieval

Women's and Gender Studies

W4300 Advanced Topics in Women's and Gender Studies