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Special Programs

Special Programs

Columbia offers a variety of special study abroad programs, exchange programs, and special courses of study for students interested in health and teaching, as well as several joint graduate and professional programs.

Study Abroad

Studying in a foreign country for a summer, semester, or year represents a significant enhancement to the Columbia College education. Study abroad expands the walls of the institution and offers students the opportunity to gain first-hand experience of the larger global community of which we all take part. Students engaged in international study discover insights into other cultures, develop new perspectives, and learn to reflect on how their own culture has shaped their understanding of the world. Students interested in studying abroad should visit the Office of Global Programs, 606 Kent, as early as possible to discuss their academic goals and to develop a plan for integrating international study into their curriculum.

The College maintains the authority over students' participation in study abroad programs and upholds standards for all potential candidates. To be eligible for participation in a Columbia-approved study abroad program, students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and be making progress toward finishing the Core Curriculum. The Core language requirement must be completed and advanced language prerequisites may apply. Study abroad candidates must complete at least one course pertaining to the country or region where they intend to study. A review of each student's academic and disciplinary records is conducted as a part of the required clearance process. Students on academic or disciplinary probation are not permitted to study abroad during the term of their probation.

It is generally possible to arrange for study in most foreign countries through programs sponsored by Columbia or by other American institutions, or through direct application to foreign universities. Such studies may be approved for one to two terms in the junior year or during any summer term.

Students on Columbia-sponsored programs at Reid Hall in Paris, the Berlin Consortium for German Studies, the Kyoto Center for Japanese Studies, the Columbia in Beijing Program at Tsinghua University, the Tropical Biology and Sustainability Program in Kenya, and the Consortium for Advanced Studies in Barcelona receive direct Columbia credit for their courses. Credit from outside approved programs is certified as transfer credit toward the degree when the student returns to the College and upon receipt of appropriate transcripts and other supporting materials. College transfer students should note that they are allowed no more than 60 points of outside credit. All students are reminded that the final 30 credits required for the degree must be taken while enrolled in the College for study on this campus or on one of the Columbia-sponsored programs abroad. Any exceptions require special permission from the Committee on Academic Standing. In addition, the following conditions apply for study abroad:

  1. No credit is granted for courses in business, education, journalism, or other subjects that at Columbia are taught only in professional schools.

  2. Transfer credit is not awarded for courses taken on a Pass/Fail basis on outside programs. The minimum grade necessary for transfer of credit is C-.

Students must be cleared to study on approved programs by the Office of Global Programs, 606 Kent, by October 15 for the spring semester and by March 15 for the fall semester/academic year. Students must register with this office before November 15 for the spring semester and April 15 for the fall semester/academic year.

While abroad, students remain enrolled at the College; tuition is paid to Columbia. Columbia in turn pays the academic costs of the overseas program. Students are financially responsible for room, board, and any other miscellaneous costs. Students receiving financial aid at Columbia remain eligible for aid when they study abroad with Columbia’s approval. Students may direct financial aid and study abroad inquiries to the Office of Financial Aid and Educational Financing, 618 Lerner.

Summer Study Abroad

Summer study abroad provides a meaningful complement to the College curriculum and can help students prepare for semester- or year-long overseas programs.

Students who participate in Columbia-sponsored programs earn direct credit for their courses. The Columbia-sponsored summer programs include: the Arabic Language Program in Amman, Jordan; the Chinese Language Program in Beijing; the Business Chinese and Internship Program in Shanghai; the Columbia-Bogazici Byzantine Studies and Urban Mapping in Istanbul; the Italian Cultural Studies Program in Venice; the Kyoto Consortium for Japanese Studies Program in Advanced and Classical Japanese; the Summer Portuguese Program in Rio de Janeiro; and the programs at Reid Hall (Summer French Studies and Paris Then and Now: Creative Writing in Paris).

Students seeking to study abroad must be cleared by the Office of Global Programs, 606 Kent. Transfer credit for summer classes taken abroad on outside programs is awarded only for foreign-language courses under these conditions:

  1. Credits for language study at the elementary and intermediate levels are awarded after the student takes a placement exam to determine his/her progress in the language. Advanced foreign-language instruction courses are accepted for academic credit upon review by the appropriate language department.
  2. The only non-language instruction courses eligible for credit are courses which will satisfy the major or concentration. The courses must be taken abroad in a foreign language and it must receive departmental approval to satisfy major or concentration requirements.
  3. Limited exceptions can be made for awarding credit for summer courses taught in English. College credit can be granted provided that the course offers a unique experience, such as a field-studies program or archaeological dig, where the study-abroad site functions as a constituent part of the course and the program must be approved by the Office of Global Programs. Departmental approval is required and the course must satisfy major or concentration requirements.

Students interested in non-credited internships and other experiential learning opportunities abroad should inquire with the Center for Career Education (East Campus Building, Lower Level).

The Berlin Consortium for German Studies

The Berlin Consortium for German Studies (BCGS) provides students with the opportunity to enroll in courses at the Freie Universität Berlin (FU Berlin) for the fall semester or a full academic year. The program begins with a six-week intensive language practicum which, in conjunction with a month-long homestay, prepares students for study at the FU Berlin. Upon completion of the practicum, students enroll in one course taught by the BCGS directors on a topic such as cultures, politics, history, literature, theater, or cinema; and for at least two, possibly more, FU Berlin courses for which they meet the prerequisites.

The FU Berlin offers a wide range of courses in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Students majoring in a variety of disciplines may choose from an array of appropriate courses.

Applicants must have the equivalent of two years of college-level German, although more is recommended.

The member institutions of the Berlin Consortium are Columbia University/ Barnard College, Cornell University, the Johns Hopkins University, Princeton University, the University of Chicago, and the University of Pennsylvania, in association with Vassar College and the University of Notre Dame.

Columbia College students attending this program have the same access to the financial aid they would have if they were enrolled in classes in New York. Students who plan to apply should consult with the Office of Global Programs and the Department of Germanic Languages.

For program information, students may consult http://www.bcgs.columbia.edu. For assistance, students may e-mail berlin@columbia.edu or call 212-854-2559.

Kyoto Consortium for Japanese Studies

The Kyoto Consortium for Japanese Studies (KCJS) offers an intensive, two-semester academic program primarily for undergraduates who wish to do advanced work in Japanese language and Japanese studies. The program is open to qualified students who have completed two or more years of college-level language at the time of enrollment. A limited number of students may be admitted for single semester study in the fall or spring.

The KCJS curriculum provides intensive Japanese language study and the opportunity to choose from a broad spectrum of social sciences and humanities courses on premodern and contemporary Japan. The program takes advantage of the numerous social and cultural resources of Kyoto by incorporating into the curriculum field trips, guest speakers, and research projects based on local field work.

Columbia College students attending this program have the same access to the financial aid they would have if they were enrolled in classes in New York. Students who plan to apply should consult with the Office of Global Programs, 606 Kent.

For program information, students may consult http://www.kcjs.columbia.edu. For assistance, students may e-mail kyoto@columbia.edu or call 212-854-2559.

The Oxford/Cambridge Scholars Program

Columbia students interested in spending their junior year at Oxford or Cambridge should apply for admission to the Oxford/Cambridge Scholars Program during the first term of their sophomore year. Application to the program is made through the Office of Global Programs where a preliminary selection of candidates is made. Designated candidates for admissions then apply to one of the participating colleges of Oxford or Cambridge. Criteria for admission include a very strong academic record at Columbia, as well as commitment to a chosen field of study. Application through the Columbia Oxford/Cambridge Scholars Program is the only way the College authorizes study at either university.

Students seeking further information about this program should contact the Office of Global Programs, 606 Kent, 212-854-2559.

Reid Hall in France

Established in 1966, the Columbia-Penn Program in Paris at Reid Hall offers semester, academic-year, and summer study-abroad options that challenge students to step outside the boundaries of a traditional French language program and use French as a means to further their understanding of their own area of study. Students with a good command of the French language refine their speaking and writing skills through intensive language training and by taking selected disciplinary courses taught in French specifically for the program at Reid Hall and in the French university system at partner institutions: Institut d'Etudes Politiques (Sciences Po), University of Paris I (Panthéon Sorbonne), University of Paris IV (Sorbonne), University of Paris VII (Denis Diderot), and the École Polytechnique. Opportunities for participating in joint honors seminars and directed research are also available.

The minimum prerequisite for the semester or academic-year program is two years of college-level French, although more is recommended.

Columbia College students attending this program have the same access to the financial aid they would have if they were enrolled in classes in New York. Students who plan to apply should consult with the Office of Global Programs, 606 Kent.

For program information, students may consult http://www.ogp.columbia.edu. For assistance, students may e-mail reidhall@columbia.edu or call 212-854-2559.

Semester or Academic Year in Beijing

This program is designed for students who demonstrate a high level of both written and spoken Mandarin Chinese and who would like to directly enroll in courses at Tsinghua University. The program offers access to a broad range of courses through the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and other schools where participants take classes with Chinese university students. A local faculty member advises students on their academic program and organizes co-curricular activities. Tsinghua University graduate students are available to tutor students and assist with the transition into the Chinese university system.

Applicants must have the equivalent of three years of college-level Chinese, although more is recommended.

Columbia College students attending this program have the same access to the financial aid they would have if they were enrolled in classes in New York. Students who plan to apply should consult with the Office of Global Programs, 606 Kent.

For program information, students may consult http://www.ogp.columbia.edu. For assistance, students may e-mail beijing@columbia.edu or call 212-854-2559.

Tropical Biology and Sustainability Program in Kenya

In partnership with Princeton University, Columbia has developed a field semester abroad program in Kenya on Tropical Biology and Sustainability. Operating during the spring semester, this global immersion experience gives students the opportunity to study ecology, evolutionary biology, conservation biology, environmental engineering, and sustainable development in the environmental hub of East Africa. Based at Princeton's Mpala Research Centre in central Kenya, and with support from Columbia's Global Center Africa in Nairobi, students also travel across Kenya to places such as the forested slopes of Mt. Kenya, the wildlife-rich savannas of Laikipia, and the coffee and tea plantations of western Kenya. Students take four three-week course modules taught by Princeton and Columbia faculty who work in Kenya and other parts of East Africa.

Applicants must have completed Environmental Biology I and II or the equivalent to be eligible to apply.

Columbia College students attending this program have the same access to the financial aid they would have if they were enrolled in classes in New York. Students who plan to apply should consult with the Office of Global Programs, 606 Kent.

For program information, students may consult http://www.ogp.columbia.edu. For assistance, students may e-mail ogp@columbia.edu or call 212-854-2559.

Consortium for Advanced Studies in Barcelona

The Consortium for Advanced Studies in Barcelona (CASB) offers a full-immersion program designed to accommodate students in any major with advanced Spanish or Catalan skills. Students are immersed in the local university environment and take their courses at one or more of the Consortium's four distinguished partner universities: the Universitat de Barcelona (UB), the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), the Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), and the Universitat Politechnica de Catalunya (UPC). The combined course offerings of the four universities offer students a vast array of opportunities in the humanities, social sciences, physical and natural sciences, and the arts. All students also attend a language and culture pro-seminar course during the first three weeks of the program which provided basic Catalan instruction, Spanish review, an overview of Spanish history and culture as well as a variety of excursions and activities. Comprehensive student services support the academic and social experience. The program runs the full academic year, although a semester option is also available.

Applicants must have the equivalent of five semesters of college-level Spanish or Catalan.

Columbia College students attending this program have the same access to the financial aid they would have if they were enrolled in classes in New York. Students who plan to apply should consult with the Office of Global Programs, 606 Kent.

For program information, students may consult http://www.ogp.columbia.edu. For assistance, students may e-mail ogp@columbia.edu or call 212-854-2559.

Exchange Programs

Columbia-Howard/Spelman Exchange Programs

Columbia College, in partnership with Barnard College, offers students the opportunity to participate in domestic exchange programs with prominent historically black colleges/universities—Howard University in Washington, D.C., and Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia. The program permits Columbia students to spend a semester or academic year at Howard or Spelman. In exchange, it allows Howard and Spelman students to spend a semester or academic year at Columbia.

Program participants pay tuition to Columbia College. However, students studying at Howard pay room and board expenses directly to Howard University, and students studying at Spelman College pay room and board expenses through Barnard College.

Courses taken at Howard and Spelman are treated as transfer credit. Transfer credit may be earned for approved courses in which students receive a letter grade of C- or higher. However, grades are not calculated into a student's grade point average. Courses taken to satisfy major requirements must be approved by the appropriate academic department.

To be eligible for participation, students should be juniors in good standing in the College and have a cumulative GPA of 2.8 or higher. Students interested in attending Howard should submit applications by the first week of March for the fall semester and by the first week of November for the spring semester. Students interested in attending Spelman during fall or spring semesters should submit applications by the first week of March. Applications and additional information may be obtained from the Center for Student Advising, 403 Lerner; 212-854-6378; csa@columbia.edu.

International Exchange Programs

In order to provide the richest and most immersive experience possible to its students, Columbia has established a network of exchange agreements with international institutions. With an exchange agreement, Columbia students may study at a partner institution; in exchange, students from the foreign institution may study at Columbia. Students take regular courses alongside local students, live in campus housing, have an academic adviser, and have access to all university facilities and resources.

As with other types of study abroad programs, all academic work completed abroad counts towards the Columbia degree, and students may take classes towards the major with the department's approval. Columbia College students pay their usual Columbia tuition and are responsible for non-academic costs abroad.

Currently, Columbia has undergraduate exchanges with:

University College London
London, England
York University York, England
Bogazici University Istanbul, Turkey
University of Paris I (Panthéon Sorbonne)
Paris, France
Institut d'Etudes Politiques (Sciences-Po) Paris, France
University of Hong Kong Hong Kong, China
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Hong Kong, China
Waseda University Tokyo, Japan
Bocconi University Milan, Italy
Universität der Künste Berlin, Germany

Columbia College students attending these programs have the same access to financial aid they would have if they were enrolled in classes in New York. Students who plan to apply should consult with the Office of Global Programs.

For program information, students may consult http://www.ogp.columbia.edu. For assistance, students may e-mail ogp@columbia.edu or call 212-854-2559.

Dual/Joint Degree Programs

Engineering

The Combined Plan (3-2) Program:

The Combined Plan (3-2) Program provides students with the opportunity to earn both the B.A. at Columbia College and the B.S. at The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science in five years. Students must apply in their junior year to The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science. In order to apply, students must have completed or be in the process of completing the pre-engineering courses including:

Mathematics: Calculus I-III at a minimum (Calculus IV is required for some programs) and MATH E1210
Chemistry: CHEM C1403-C1404 or C3045-C3046 or C1604
The lab requirement depends on the program.
Physics: PHYS C1401-C1402; or C1601-C1602; or C2801-C2802
Some programs require a third semester of physics.
The lab requirement depends on the program.

Computer Science: ENGI E1006, COMS W1003, COMS W1004, or COMS W1005 (depending on program);
Economics: ECON W1105

Students must also complete the requirements for a Columbia College concentration or major and any additional pre-curricular requirements for the specific engineering major (see specific requirements on the admissions website). In the fourth and fifth years of study, to be completed at The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, requirements for the major at The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science must be completed in consultation with the major adviser there. Students with more than 35 transfer credits are not eligible for the program. Housing and financial aid will be continued. Each fall the Admissions Office conducts information sessions in which students meet with the Combined Plan Program administrator. For more information, students should contact their advising dean or e-mail: combinedplan@columbia.edu.

The 4-1 Program at Columbia College:

The 4-1 Program provides students in The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science the opportunity to obtain a B.A. degree from the College with one additional year of study after completion of four years of study and fulfillment of all requirements for the B.S. degree in engineering. Students who are interested in the 4-1 Program must declare their interest in the spring of their sophomore year and plan their next three years of study with the program adviser. The program is selective, and admission is based on the following factors: granting of the B.S. at SEAS at the end of the fourth year; the fulfillment of the College Core requirements by the end of the fourth year at SEAS; maintaining a minimum GPA of 3.0 in College Core and other courses; the successful completion of any prerequisites for the College major or concentration; and creating a plan to complete a College major or concentration by the end of their fifth year that is approved by the appropriate director of Undergraduate Studies. For more information, students may contact their advising dean.

International Affairs Five-Year Program

The International Affairs Five-Year Program offers students the opportunity to earn both B.A. and M.I.A. degrees in five years. Students apply to the program during their junior year through the Admissions Office in the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA). Once admitted to the joint program, students complete their senior year at Columbia College, but the bulk of courses taken are graduate-level ones acceptable to SIPA. Admission to the joint program does not constitute admission to SIPA. To be eligible for the program, students must have been enrolled in Columbia College for at least four semesters by the end of the junior year, completed a minimum of 93 credits, taken a basic course in economics, achieved competence in a modern foreign language, and completed all College Core requirements and major/concentration requirements, with the exception of 6 to 8 credits. These two courses may be taken during the senior year while completing the 24 points required by SIPA. Three points of SIPA requirements may be taken in the junior year. Summer courses between the junior and senior year may be considered. Students must receive the B.A. with a satisfactory grade point average. Upon formal admission to SIPA after their senior year, students must apply for housing and financial aid. For more information, students may contact their advising dean.

The Juilliard School

Exceptionally talented Columbia College students have access to instrumental, composition and voice instruction at The Juilliard School through two distinct programs.

The Exchange Program

Students can be invited to cross-register for weekly instrumental (classical and jazz), composition and vocal instruction with the Juilliard faculty, but not participate in Juilliard ensembles or classes, after completing the formal application and successfully auditioning at Juilliard. Annual juries are held at the end of each academic year, which determine eligibility to continue in the program. Applicants to the exchange may be first-year applicants, or current students within Columbia College. Students may participate in the program for up to four years of study and have the option to apply for the joint program in their junior year. Columbia College students interested in this program must submit a Juilliard Application for Admission, including pre-screening materials, by the December 1 deadline.

The Joint Program

Students already in the exchange program can participate in the joint program that offers students the opportunity to earn a B.A. from Columbia, and an M.M. from Juilliard in five years (voice candidates may need six years of study to complete the program depending on preparation). It is recommended that students interested in the program complement their exchange instruction with music classes and participation in ensembles at Columbia. However, exchange participants do not have any specific course requirements at Columbia in order to qualify for admission to the M.M. at Juilliard. If admitted, students normally spend two subsequent years (three for voice majors) primarily at Juilliard, while finishing any remaining undergraduate requirements at Columbia College. Students receiving Columbia financial aid are subject to Juilliard’s financial aid policies during their time at Juilliard, and are not eligible for aid from Columbia.

Students who wish to pursue the joint program should consult with the Center for Student Advising to plan accordingly. To apply, Columbia College students must have completed 94 points of course work, including the Core Curriculum requirements and major or concentration requirements for the B.A. within three years, and have participated in the exchange (see above) for at least one year. Exchange participants interested in applying for the program must submit the Juilliard application by the December 1 deadline. The pre-screening (if applicable) is waived. Live auditions are held at The Juilliard School in early March.

Law—AILE (Accelerated Interdisciplinary Legal Education) Program

The AILE Program annually provides up to one or two College students with outstanding records the opportunity to earn both B.A. and J.D. degrees in six years. Selected students matriculate at the Law School after their junior year, having completed the required 93 points including the College Core requirements and a concentration. Interested students must submit an application in the spring of their junior year to the Office of Pre-Professional Advising in the Center for Student Advising. The College nominates one or two juniors each year; the final admission determination is made by the Law School Admissions Committee. Transfer students and students with fewer than six semesters of study as Columbia College students on this campus (not abroad) before entering the Law School are not eligible for the program. Prospective participants in this program must take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) no later than the February administration of the year of intended enrollment. After formal admission to the Law School, the students are withdrawn from the College. In the student’s second and third years at the Law School, 12 points of course work taken only at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences must be completed. The courses must be approved beforehand by the student’s preprofessional adviser. AILE candidates are required to apply for the B.A. degree the term before they expect to graduate. Students should inform their dean of their plans to graduate in order to be considered for honors and Phi Beta Kappa. AILE students receive College and Law School degrees at the same time. Once admitted to the Law School, students interested in financial aid and housing should apply through the Law School. For more information, students may contact the Office of Pre-Professional Advising, 403 Lerner.

Public Policy and Administration Five-Year Program

The Graduate Program in Public Policy and Administration provides students with the opportunity to earn both B.A. and M.P.A. degrees in five years. The application process is identical to that of the B.A.–M.I.A. program. Candidates need to have taken college math, preferably a year of calculus. An introductory microeconomics course is highly recommended. During the senior year, 24 credits must be taken in the School of International and Public Affairs. It is therefore imperative that all College Core and major/concentration requirements be completed by the end of the junior year, with the exception of one or possibly two courses. For more information, see International Affairs Five-Year Program.

Columbia-Sciences Po B.A./M.A. Program

Building on a strong partnership between Columbia and Sciences Po, the Columbia-Sciences Po five-year B.A./M.A. Program allows selected Columbia undergraduate students from Columbia College to follow an intensive joint program in Public and International Affairs.

Students from Columbia College apply to the B.A./M.A. program during the second semester of their sophomore year. Selected students spend their junior year at Columbia, carefully choosing their courses to meet their Core and major requirements at Columbia. During their senior year, students remain enrolled at Columbia, but study as Sciences Po graduate students. During their second year at Science Po, students are no longer enrolled at Columbia, but continue working towards their graduate degree at Sciences Po.

Upon completion of this joint program, students obtain both the B.A. awarded by Columbia University and the M.A. degree at Sciences Po. Some students may also opt for the Research Master's Degree at Sciences Po, which is the first step towards the doctorate.

The joint program is principally aimed at students specializing in public and international affairs who wish to develop their intellectual and professional capabilities from a cross-cultural and transatlantic perspective. It is also open to students interested in more academic and research-oriented careers. This dual training and double credential offers a unique access to Europe, the Francophone world, and to the field of international affairs in general.

For program information, students may consult http://www.ogp.columbia.edu. For assistance, students may e-mail ogp@columbia.edu or call 212-854-2559.

Health Professions

Medical, dental, and other health professional schools prefer that undergraduates complete a four-year program of study toward the bachelor's degree. All health professional schools require prerequisite coursework. This coursework can be completed during the undergraduate years along with the Core Curriculum and the major or concentration.

Major or Concentration

National statistics, as well as the experiences of Columbia College students, show that there is no major preferred by medical school admissions committees. Students are encouraged to major or concentrate in any field that appeals to them. Students concentrating in a non-science area may wish to take one or two extra science courses to demonstrate their interest and aptitude in the sciences. Students should work closely with their advising deans and their major adviser in planning a program that meets their interests.

Premedical Requirements

The required premedical science courses are as follows:

  1. General Chemistry
  2. Organic Chemistry
    • One of the following:
      • CHEM C3443-C3444 and W3543 (the second term of lab, CHEM W3546, is entirely optional)
      • CHEM C3045-C3046, and CHEM W2507 in the second term of the first year. This sequence is available only to prospective chemistry or biochemistry majors who have Advanced Placement credit in chemistry, and who achieve a high enough score on the Chemistry Department placement test.
      • Students who score well on the placement test have the option of taking CHEM C1604 in the first year and CHEM C3443-C3444, and W3543 in the sophomore year.
  3. Physics
    • One of the following:
      • PHYS V1201-V1202 and accompanying laboratories (PHYS W1291-W1292)
      • PHYS C1401 and either C1402 or C1602 or C1601 and C1602 and one of the following laboratories (C1493, C1494, C2699, W3081)
      • PHYS C2801-C2802 is an option for students with exceptionally strong backgrounds in both physics and mathematics; Advanced Placement in these subjects or the equivalent; and the instructor's permission. A special placement exam is held during new student orientation. This sequence covers the subject matter of PHYS C1601, C1602 and C2601 and is preparatory for advanced work in physics and related fields. There is no accompanying laboratory; however, students are encouraged to take the intermediate laboratory PHYS W3081 in the following year.
  4. Biology
    • BIOL C2005 or EEEB W2001 and BIOL C2006 or an advanced course chosen in consultation with a departmental adviser.
    • At least 2 points of laboratory work in biology. BIOL W2501 or W3002 is recommended for premedical students not majoring in biology. Other biology lecture and lab courses may be substituted for the preferred sequence. Please consult with a preprofessional adviser or advising dean.
  5. Mathematics
    • Although it is not required by all medical schools, calculus is required for Columbia chemistry sequences and therefore all premedical students should have at least the equivalent of one semester of Calculus. Some medical schools require a full year of calculus and others require statistics. Ideally, this should be taken during their first year along with chemistry. It is sometimes possible to use AP credit toward this requirement.

Some medical schools do not allow botany courses to be used to fulfill their biology requirements. There are medical schools that have begun to require a course in biochemistry, and many others strongly recommend it. Additionally, some schools have expanded requirements that include statistics and courses in the behavioral or social sciences. Students should consult the latest edition of Medical School Admission Requirements for details. Schools of osteopathy, dentistry, optometry, and podiatry have requirements similar to those of medical school. Reference copies of appropriate bulletins are available in the Center for Student Advising. General chemistry should be taken before biology and Organic chemistry. The rest of the premedical courses may be taken in any order. Questions should be directed to the Office of Pre-Professional Advising, Center for Student Advising, 403 Lerner.

Barnard Courses

While it is preferred that students complete their premedical requirements with Columbia College courses, students may take premedical requirements at Barnard. However, the Columbia Biology and Chemistry Departments may not accept Barnard courses toward the concentration or major. Students should consult their department adviser before registering for a Barnard course.

Students with Advanced Placement

Advanced Placement credit in chemistry, biology, and physics are not accepted by a number of medical schools. Therefore, all students with Advanced Placement credit are strongly advised to take further courses in the field in which they have received such credit.

Application to Health Profession Programs

Students must apply for admission to health profession schools more than one year in advance of the entry date. Students who are interested in going directly on to health profession schools following graduation should complete all prerequisite courses required for the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) by the summer following the junior year. It is entirely acceptable for students to take time between undergraduate and health profession school to apply and thus delay application to these schools for one or more years.

Students planning to apply to medical or dental school should be evaluated by the Premedical Advisory Committee prior to application. A Premedical Advisory Committee application is made available each year in December. Please consult with a preprofessional adviser in the Center for Student Advising for more information regarding this process.

Volunteer Program

Preprofessional Advising maintains an on-line listing of many different clinical volunteer programs across the city. Students may find placements in a variety of different settings including, but not limited to, emergency rooms; intensive care units; research laboratories; outpatient settings; and health clinics. Some clinical experience is strongly advised before application to medical school.

Teaching and Educational Studies

The Barnard Education Program is a certification program for students interested in combining elementary or secondary school teaching with their liberal arts major. First-years and sophomores interested in teaching are strongly encouraged to attend an Education Program Open House or Program Planning Meeting, held in the fall and spring of each year. Interested students should speak to a faculty member during the sophomore year to ensure they can fit the coursework into their schedule. Applications to the program are due in the spring of the sophomore year.

Students who are interested in education, but do not plan to teach, can take a special concentration in educational studies. Interested students should take Contemporary issues in education during the sophomore year to indicate their intention to pursue this special concentration.

For Open House and Program Planning Meeting dates, contact Myles Nugent at mnugent@barnard.edu. For additional information regarding the program, please consult the Barnard Education Program website: http://barnard.edu/education/.

Faculty members designated to answer questions are as follows:
Lee Anne Bell, Director, 335 Milbank, leebell@barnard.edu
Maria Rivera, Assistant Professor, 336 Milbank, mriveram@barnard.edu
Lisa Edstrom, Certification Officer, 301 Milbank, elisa@barnard.edu