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A discussion of "Radicalizing Her" with author Dr. Nimmi Gowrinathan

2016-05-04 12:00:00 2016-05-04 18:00:00 America/New_York Star Wars Day Party May the force be with you Tatooine Luke Skywalker luke@starwars.com
Apr 5
A discussion of 

Event Info

Event Date: 
Monday, April 5, 2021 - 4:15pm to 5:45pm
Online Event

Event Contact

IRWGS
<p><em>This event that was previously co-presented by Columbia University IRWGS and SAI has been moved off campus in solidarity with the striking members of&nbsp;<a href="https://columbiagradunion.org/" target="_blank">GWC-UAW Local 2110</a>. The event will now be hosted by the Colin Powell School of Civil and Global Leadership at the City College of New York.&nbsp;</em></p> <p><em>To access the webinar on Monday, April 5th, please use the following link that day at the 4:15pm ET event start time:&nbsp;<a href="https://ccny.zoom.us/j/88442997663" target="_blank">https://ccny.zoom.us/j/88442997663</a>.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>A discussion of&nbsp;<em>Radicalizing Her</em> with author Dr. Nimmi Gowrinathan (CUNY)</strong></p> <p><strong>Respondent: Dipali Mukhodpadhyay (University of Minnesota)</strong></p> <p><strong>Moderator: Lila Abu-Lughod (Anthropology)</strong></p> <p>Though the female fighter is often seen as an anomaly, women make up nearly 30% of militant movements worldwide. Historically, these women--viewed as victims, weak-willed wives, and prey to Stockholm Syndrome--have been deeply misunderstood.&nbsp;<em>Radicalizing Her</em>&nbsp;holds the female fighter up in all her complexity as a kind of mirror to contemporary conversations on gender, violence, and power. Dr. Gowrinathan spent nearly twenty years in conversation with female fighters in Sri Lanka, Eritrea, Pakistan, and Colombia. The intensity of these interactions consistently unsettled her assumptions about violence, re-positioning how these women were positioned in relation to power. Gowrinathan posits that the erasure of the female fighter from narratives on gender and power is not only dangerous but also, anti-feminist.&nbsp; She argues for a deeper, more nuanced understanding of women who choose violence.</p>