Africana Studies


AFRS BC2004x (Section 01) Introduction to African Studies 3 pts. Interdisciplinary and thematic approach to the study of Africa, moving from pre-colonial through colonial and post-colonial periods to contemporary Africa. Focus will be on its history, societal relations, politics and the arts. The objective is to provide a critical survey of the history as well as the continuing debates in Africana studies.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AFRS BC2004
AFRS
2004
02457
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
A. George 0 [ More Info ]

AFRS BC2005x (Section 01) Caribbean Culture and Societies 3 pts. Multidisciplinary exploration of the Anglophone, Hispanic and Francophone Caribbean. Discusses theories about the development and character of Caribbean societies; profiles representative islands; and explores enduring and contemporary issues in Caribbean studies (race, color and class; politics and governance; political economy, the struggles for liberation; cultural and identity and migration.)

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AFRS BC2005
AFRS
2005
07078
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
M. Horn 0 [ More Info ]

AFRS BC3055x Slave Resistance in the United States from the Colonial Era to the Civil War 3 pts.

Analyzes the multifaceted nature of slave resistance, its portrayal and theorization by scholars. Critically examines the various pathways of resistance of enslaved Africans and African-Americans, both individually and collectively (e.g., running away, non-cooperation, theft, arson, as well as verbal and physical confrontation, revolts and insurrections). Considers how gender shaped acts of resistance.

AFRS BC3110x (Section 01) Africana Colloquium: Critical Race Theory 4 pts. Prerequisites: Students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then. Enrollment limited to 18 students. Priority will be given to Africana majors and CCIS students (Africana Studies, American Studies and Women's Studies majors; minors in Race and Ethnic Studies). General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC). Students will examine the origins and development of race-thinking in the Anglo‑American world with a particular focus on representation and reading practices. Our conversations will draw upon a number of articulations of race theory, including specific post-1980s Critical Race Theory. The course examines "race" narratives as well as critical readings on race from psychoanalytic, post‑colonial, feminist, and critical legal perspectives. These readings will be framed by several interlocking questions: how does representation both respond to and influence socioeconomic conditions? What is the relationship of race to color, ethnicity, and nation? How does race interact with other categories such as class, sexuality and gender? What cultural work is performed by racial definitions and categories such as hybridity and purity?

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AFRS BC3110
AFRS
3110
06842
001
Tu 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
K. Hall 6 / 50 [ More Info ]

AFRS BC3560x (Section 01) Human Rights and Social Change in Sub-Saharan Africa 4 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Examines the evolution of the ideas, institutions and practices associated with social justice in Africa and their relationship to contemporary international human rights movement and focuses on the role of human rights in social change. A number of themes will re-occur throughout the course, notably tensions between norms and reality, cultural diversity, economic and political asymmetries, the role of external actors, and women as rights providers. Countries of special interest include Liberia, Senegal, South African and Tanzania.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AFRS BC3560
AFRS
3560
08422
001
Tu 9:00a - 10:50a
TBA
J. Martin 2 [ More Info ]

AFRS BC3570x Africana Issues: Diasporas of the Indian Ocean 4 pts. The Indian Ocean has been called the cradle of globalization, a claim bolstered by seasonal monsoon winds and the trade that these enabled. We will consider the aesthetic histories of such trade by engaging literary and other cultural exchanges (including film, visual arts, music, and dance). What did the Zulu prophet Isaiah Shembe learn from Gujarati poets? Other than a major slaving center and source of spices, what did role did Zanzibar play in the development of music and literary forms that look to Oman as well as the East Coast of Africa? We focus on four sites: Durban (South Africa), Bombay (India), Zanzibar (Tanzania) and Port Louis (Mauritius). This course will be taught simultaneously between Barnard in New York and the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. Students from both campuses will be encouraged to interact electronically and to establish a blog and website. The course will also have live-streamed guest speakers from chosen sites around the Indian Ocean.

AFRS BC3998x (Section 01) Senior Seminar 4 pts. A program of interdisciplinary research leading to the writing of the senior essay. Senior Seminar is not an independent study, but a structured seminar on methodology and criticism, which first results in an approved and substantial thesis proposal and annotated bibliography, and next produces the final thesis.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AFRS BC3998
AFRS
3998
07828
001
Tu 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
C. Naylor 0 [ More Info ]

Art History


AHIS V3201 (Section 001) Arts of China 3 pts. An introduction to the arts of China, from the Neolithic period to the present, stressing materials and processes of bronze casting, the development of representational art, principles of text illustration, calligraphy, landscape painting, imperial patronage, and the role of the visual arts in elite culture. Global Core.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS V3201
AHIS
3201
17984
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
612 SCHERMERHORN HALL
R. Harrist 24 / 60 [ More Info ]

AHIS V3248x Greek Art and Architecture 3 pts. Introduction to the art and architecture of the Greek world during the archaic, classical, and Hellenistic periods (11th - 1st centuries B.C.E.). Discussion Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS V3248
AHIS
3248
67286
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
612 SCHERMERHORN HALL
I. Mylonopoulos 46 / 67 [ More Info ]

Asian Humanities


AHUM V3340y Art In China, Japan, and Korea 3 pts. Introduces distinctive aesthetic traditions of China, Japan, and Korea--their similarities and differences--through an examination of the visual significance of selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts in relation to the history, culture, and religions of East Asia. Discussion Section Required. Global Core.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHUM V3340
AHUM
3340
19457
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
832 SCHERMERHORN HALL
D. Delbanco 22 / 22 [ More Info ]

Art History


AHIS H3545x Paris, Cultural Capital in the Middle Ages [in English] 3 pts.

AHIS W3895x and y Majors' Colloquium: the Literature and Methods of Art History 4 pts. Prerequisites: the department's permission. Students must sign-up in 826 Schermerhorn. Introduction to different methodological approaches to the study of art and visual culture. Majors are encouraged to take the colloquium during their junior year.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS W3895
AHIS
3895
67053
001
M 11:00a - 12:50p
930 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Z. Strother 0 / 25 [ More Info ]

AHIS C3948x Nineteenth-Century Criticism 4 pts. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and the instructor's permission. Selected readings in 19th-century philosophy, literature and art criticism with emphasis on problems of modernity and aesthetic experience. Texts include work by Diderot, Kant, Coleridge, Hegel, Emerson, Flaubert, Ruskin, Baudelaire, and Nietzsche.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS C3948
AHIS
3948
28203
001
Tu 10:10a - 12:00p
930 SCHERMERHORN HALL
J. Crary 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

AHIS H3962x Gothic and the Kings [in English] 4 pts.

AHIS C3980x or y Supervised Independent Study 3 pts. Prerequisites: the permission of the departmental consultant or director of undergraduate studies and of the instructor. Independent research and the writing of an essay under supervision of a member of the Art History Department. Only one independent study may be counted toward the major.

AHIS BC3985y Introduction To Connoisseurship 4 pts. Prerequisites: Please see Barnard College Art History department Web site for instructions. Instructor permission required. Enrollment limited to 15. Factors involved in judging works of art, with emphasis on paintings; materials; technique, condition, attribution; identification of imitations and fakes; questions of relative quality.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS BC3985
AHIS
3985
05399
001
M 9:00a - 10:50a
TBA
M. Ainsworth 5 [ More Info ]

AHIS C3997 (Section 01) Senior Thesis 3 pts. Prerequisites: Must receive departmental approval. Required for all thesis writers.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS C3997
AHIS
3997
98442
001
W 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
K. Jones 0 / 0 [ More Info ]

AHIS W4089x Native American Art and Culture 3 pts. This introduction to Native North American art surveys traditions of painting, sculpture, ceramics, textiles, photography and architecture and traces the careers of contemporary Indian modernists and postmodernists. It emphasizes artistic developments as a means of preserving culture and resisting domination in response to intertribal contact, European colonization and American expansion.

AHIS G4102x Chinese Art Under the Mongols 3 pts. The Yuan dynasty (1279-1368), when China was ruled by the Mongols, was a period of intense creativity in the visual arts of all media. Long the focus of studies devoted to China's scholar-amateur or literati artists, the period of Mongol rule has more recently inspired new approaches that attempt to deal with a much wider range of materials and that place the arts of the Yuan dynasty within a pan-Asian context. Focusing on works of art in local collections, we will address topics such as the definition of Mongol identity as expressed in the visual arts produced in China, the continuation of workshop and professional painting traditions illuminated by recent archaeological discoveries, relationships among the arts of different media, including metalwork, ceramics, and textiles. The seminar also will require students to reexamine long accepted notions of "self-expression" and the social dimensions of literati painting and calligraphy. Interested undergraduates, please send an email to dj2382@columbia.edu for registration assistance.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS G4102
AHIS
4102
83397
001
Tu 2:10p - 4:00p
934 SCHERMERHORN HALL
R. Harrist 7 / 20 [ More Info ]

AHIS G4102x The Power of Ornament: Roman Imperial Imagery and Its Reception 3 pts. This lecture intends to answer questions about the nature of Roman monuments and their decoration: What was their function? And how did they actually fulfill that function? To what extent was the diffusion of Roman public imagery the outcome of a planned scheme, and to what extent should we instead see it as the unintended result of different factors? In addressing these questions, the lecture will focus particularly on the mechanisms that led to the entrenchment of imperial ideology in Roman society, moving beyond conventional narratives that frame this issue in terms of an 'acceptance vs resistance' dichotomy. Interested undergraduates, please send an email to dj2382@columbia.edu for registration assistance.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS G4102
AHIS
4102
83397
001
Tu 2:10p - 4:00p
934 SCHERMERHORN HALL
R. Harrist 7 / 20 [ More Info ]

AHIS W4155x Art & Archaeology of Mesopotamia 3 pts. Introduction to the art and architecture of Mesopotamia beginning with the establishment of the first cities in the fourth millennium B.C.E. through the fall of Babylon to Alexander of Macedon in the fourth century B.C.E. Focus on the distinctive concepts and uses of art in the Assyro-Babylonian tradition.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS W4155
AHIS
4155
25412
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
612 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Z. Bahrani 38 / 65 [ More Info ]

AHIS W4155x Minimalism & Postminimalism 3 pts. This course examines minimalism-one of the most significant aesthetic movements-during the sixties and seventies. More than visual art, the course considers minimal sculpture, music, dance, and "structural" film, their historical precedents, development, critical and political aspects. Artists include: Carl Andre, Tony Conrad, Dan Flavin, Eva Hesse, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, Anthony McCall, Yvonne Rainer, Richard Serra, Robert Smithson.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS W4155
AHIS
4155
25412
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
612 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Z. Bahrani 38 / 65 [ More Info ]

AHIS G4451x The Materiality of Painting, From Titian to Velazquez 3 pts. Venetian painting of the 16th century was famous for its painting process-colorito-that was entirely produced through colors without the use of drawn lines. Titian was the main representative of colorito and his work reflects the emergence of visible brushstrokes in painting. This seminar will focus on the emergence of the Venetian brushstroke and its transfer to Spain, particularly as it relates to the works of El Greco and Velázquez. Interested undergraduates, please send an email to dj2382@columbia.edu for registration assistance.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS G4451
AHIS
4451
82346
001
Th 2:10p - 4:00p
930 SCHERMERHORN HALL
D. Bodart 19 / 25 [ More Info ]

AHIS G4650x Post-War Critical Theory 3 pts. Is today a time of reinvention for the critical theory that took shape after the Second World War? In this course, taking 1989 as a new take-off date, we explore this hypothesis through a series of over-lapping questions including: what is contemporary as distinct from modern? What is an apparatus as distinct from a medium, a media, or a machine? Is there or can there be a global art history? Can participation be critical? Focusing of the role of visual art and art institutions, their expansions and transformations, we thus address the question of the fate and the function of critical theory in the new world of information economies, new urbanizations, biennials and art-fairs.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS G4650
AHIS
4650
23173
001
W 2:10p - 4:00p
934 SCHERMERHORN HALL
J. Rajchman 24 / 25 [ More Info ]

American Studies


AMST BC3401x (Section 001) Colloquium in American Studies: Cultural Approaches to the American Past 4 pts. Introduction to the theoretical approaches of American Studies, as well as the methods and materials used in the interdisciplinary study of American society. Through close reading of a variety of texts (e.g., novels, films, essays), we will analyze the creation, maintenance, and transmission of cultural meaning within American society.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AMST BC3401
AMST
3401
01003
001
W 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
J. Kassanoff 1 [ More Info ]

AMST BC3703x-BC3704y Senior Seminar 4 pts. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to senior majors. Individual research on topic related to major thematic concentration and preparation of senior thesis.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AMST BC3703
AMST
3703
02181
001
Tu 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
J. Kassanoff 0 [ More Info ]
AMST
3703
00373
002
Tu 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 [ More Info ]

AMST BC3999x and y Independent Research 3-4 pts.

AMST W3920x American Studies Senior Project Colloquium 1 pt. Required for American studies students who intend to do a senior research project in spring This course is for American studies majors planning to complete senior projects in the spring. The course is designed to help students clarify their research agenda, sharpen their questions, and locate their primary and secondary sources. Through class discussions and a "workshop" peer review process, each member of the course will enter spring semester with a completed 5-8 page prospectus and bibliography that will provide an excellent foundation for the work of actually writing the senior essay. The colloquium will meet every other week at a convenient time for the participants, and is required for everyone planning to do a senior research project.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AMST W3920
AMST
3920
15016
001
Tu 6:10p - 8:00p
317 HAMILTON HALL
C. Blake 15 / 15 [ More Info ]

AMST W3930x (Section 001) Topics in American Studies: Journalism, Democracy, and the Digital Revolution 4 pts. Attend first class for instructor permission The American news media occupy a complex role in the life of the nation: at once a constitutionally protected feature of democracy and a product of free enterprise. With an eye to the 2012 presidential election, this class will explore the transformation of the media from the heyday of the great 20th century news organizations to the triumph of Twitter. How have the disruption of the mainstream media and the rise of radically decentralized sources of information affected the political discourse and the decisions Americans make? We'll look back at the Grey Lady, Walter Cronkite and Watergate, and into the future, where favored news purveyors are raw rather than mediated, hot rather than cool, personal rather than formal, targeted rather than broad, passionate rather than neutral. We'll have visits from media players and prognosticators, examine where journalistic standards are going, and assess the impact of news sources from Fox News to the latest hashtag.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AMST W3930
AMST
3930
72832
001
W 2:10p - 4:00p
317 HAMILTON HALL
C. Miller 0 / 18 [ More Info ]

AMST W3930x (Section 002) Topics in American Studies: Equity in American Higher Education 4 pts. Interview required. Please see American Studies website. In this seminar we examine the roles colleges and universities play in American society; the differential access high school students have to college based on family background and income, ethnicity, and other characteristics; the causes and consequences of this differential access; and some attempts to make access more equitable. Readings and class meetings cover the following subjects historically and in the 21st century: the variety of American institutions of higher education; admission and financial aid policies at selective and less selective, private and public, colleges; affirmative action and race-conscious admissions; what "merit" means in college admissions; and the role of the high school in helping students attend college. Students in the seminar are required to spend at least four hours each week as volunteers at the Double Discovery Center (DDC) in addition to completing assigned reading, participating in seminar discussions, and completing written assignments. DDC is an on-campus program that helps New York City high school students who lack many of the resources needed to succeed in college and to be successful in gaining admission and finding financial aid. The seminar integrates students' first-hand experiences with readings and class discussions.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AMST W3930
AMST
3930
62487
002
M 2:10p - 4:00p
317 HAMILTON HALL
A. Delbanco
R. Lehecka
13 / 18 [ More Info ]

AMST W3930x (Section 003) The Supreme Court in American History 4 pts. Attend first class for instructor permission. As Tocqueville observed, "scarcely any political question arises in the United States that is not resolved, sooner or later, into a judicial question." As a consequence, the Supreme Court of the United States has been at the center of many of the most significant developments in American history. It has played significant roles in, for example, (1) the creation of the young republic and the achievement of a balance between states and the federal government, (2) race relations including the institution of slavery, (3) the rights of workers, (4) civil rights, and (5) elections. This seminar will explore the Supreme Court's role in American society by examining its decisions on key issues throughout its history.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AMST W3930
AMST
3930
24693
003
M 6:10p - 8:00p
317 HAMILTON HALL
B. Rosenberg 0 / 18 [ More Info ]

AMST W3930x (Section 004) Topics in American Studies: Freedom and Citizenship in the United States 4 pts. Application required. Please see American Studies website.Freedom and Citizenship in the United States will examine the historical development of ideas of freedom and citizenship in the American context. We will examine texts that treat of issues like the rights and responsibilities of membership in a political association, the nature and limits of the power of the collective over the individual, and the norms of exclusion and inclusion that define a body politic. The course will focus exclusively on primary texts, and the order of readings will be roughly chronological, emphasizing the historical development of the concepts of citizenship, nation, and American identity. The first weeks the course will be dedicated to reading and discussing major texts in Western political history that frame the 17th century founding of the American colonies. The rest of the course will situate the American case in this historical development, beginning with an examination of the Puritan migration to New England and the early communities they formed, and continuing with the study of major documents surrounding the Revolution, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the New Deal, the Civil Rights Movement, and contemporary debates about the meaning of American citizenship. In addition to the classroom requirements, students will be expected to volunteer a minimum of 4 hours a week with the Double Discovery Center (DDC), in connection to the Freedom and Citizenship Project which DDC conducts in partnership with the American Studies Program.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AMST W3930
AMST
3930
62200
004
Tu 4:10p - 6:00p
317 HAMILTON HALL
R. Montas 0 / 18 [ More Info ]

AMST W3930x (Section 5) Salinger, Lowell, McCullers: Freaks & Aesthetes in 1950s Families 4-4 pts. Attend first class for instructor permission We will read J. D. Salinger's Glass Family fiction, which features a group of hyper-articulate New York prodigies who experiment with Eastern religion, Robert Lowell's prose and poetry in Life Studies, a breakthrough in "confessional" subject matter, and Carson McCuller's novel A Member of the Wedding, about the coming of age of a Southern tomboy. We will also watch and discuss Nicholas Ray's film Rebel Without a Cause with James Dean, the most famous portrayal of teenage rage and angst. All these works narrate crises of conformity in postwar America--the much advertised sense of "alienation"--and dramatize the possibility of alternative values and improvised families.

AMST W3997x Supervised Individual Research 1-4 pts. For students who want to do independent study of topics not covered by normal program offerings, or for senior American Studies majors working on the Senior Honors Project independent of 3990y. The student must find a faculty sponsor and work out a plan of study; a copy of this plan should be submitted to the program director.


Ancient Studies


ANCS V3995x Senior Seminar in Ancient Studies 3 pts. Topic for 2006: Hellenistic and Roman Egypt

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANCS V3995
ANCS
3995
28764
001
TBA M. Folch 1 [ More Info ]

ANCS V3997x and y Directed Readings in Ancient Studies 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the departmental representative required. Program of readings in some aspect of Ancient Studies, supervised by an appropriate faculty member chosen from the departments offering Ancient Studies courses. Testing by a series of essays, one long paper, or oral or written examination(s).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANCS V3997
ANCS
3997
05460
012
TBA N. Worman 0 [ More Info ]

ANCS V3998x and y Directed Research in Ancient Studies 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the departmental representative required. Program of research in Ancient Studies. Research paper required. The topic must be submitted to the department representative and the appropriate adviser decided upon by April 1 of the semester preceding that in which the student will be enrolled in the course. The student and the departmental representative will request supervision of the research paper from an appropriate faculty member in a department offering Ancient Studies courses.

ANCS V3995x Senior Seminar In Ancient Studies 3 pts. Required for all Ancient Studies majors, but also open to advanced undergraduates in classics, history, art history and archaeology, and other related disciplines. Topic: The Greek Household. This seminar explores the composition of the classical Greek household and the relationships of its members, examining the different factors affecting the position of an individual within his or her family and the degree to which a household was defined by the status, role and profession of its members. Although concentrating on classical Athens, we will pay attention to other states, notably Sparta. Investigation of general trends will be complemented by analysis of particular circumstances, including certain historical puzzles such as the union of Pericles and Aspasia (harlot-concubine or legal wife?) and that of Stephanos of Neaira (did they really break Athenian family law?).

Readings will include a variety of primary sources in translation, from documents to Athenian drama, as well as a selection of important scholarly works on the subject. Archeological material will play an important part in our investigation, and some sessions will be held at the Metropolitan Museum of Arts.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANCS V3995
ANCS
3995
28764
001
TBA M. Folch 1 [ More Info ]

ANCS V3997x and y Directed Readings In Ancient Studies 3 pts. Prerequisites: the director of undergraduate studies' permission. Program of readings in some aspect of ancient studies, supervised by an appropriate faculty member chosen from the departments offering courses in the program in Ancient Studies. Evaluation by a series of essays, one long paper, or oral or written examination(s).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANCS V3997
ANCS
3997
05460
012
TBA N. Worman 0 [ More Info ]

ANCS V3998x and y Directed Research In Ancient Studies 3 pts. Program of research in ancient studies under the direction of an advisor associated with the program, resulting in a research paper. Required for all Ancient Studies majors. Outline and bibliography must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies before credit will be awarded for ANCS V3995.


Anthropology


ANTH V1002x and y The Interpretation of Culture 3 pts. The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Using case studies from ethnography, the course explores the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief system, art, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V1002
ANTH
1002
04478
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
P. West 48 / 120 [ More Info ]

ANTH V1007x The Origins of Human Society 3 pts. Examines the grand sweep of human development from our first bipedal steps some six million years ago, to the earliest evidence of art and symbolism, and on to the emergence of the first agricultural villages. Given the immensity of time under consideration, emphasis is placed on those heightened periods of change commonly described as "revolutions". Participants will become familiar with the fossil and/or archaeological records or those revolutions and the competing theories of why they occurred.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V1007
ANTH
1007
62549
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 5 [ More Info ]

ANTH V1009y (Section 01) Introduction to Language and Culture 3 pts. Prerequisites: TBD Introduction to the study of the production, interpretation, and reproduction of social meanings as expressed through language. In exploring language in relation to culture and society, the focus is on how communication informs and transforms the sociocultural environment.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V1009
ANTH
1009
09332
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
S. Scott 18 / 60 [ More Info ]

Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology


EEEB V1010x (Section 001) The Human Species: Its Place in Nature 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites, no enrollment cap Lab fee: $25. Designed to acquaint students with a variety of scientific disciplines through the investigation of human evolution, specifically Darwin's theory of evolution; Mendel's principles of inheritance, major patterns of evolution; primate behavioral morphology and evolution; and the fossil remains and evolutionary trends in human evolution. [Taught every fall.] Lab Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EEEB V1010
EEEB
1010
67980
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
J. Shapiro 21 [ More Info ]

Anthropology


ANTH V2004x Introduction to Social and Cultural Theory 3 pts. Introduces students to theoretical works and ideas that have formed the modern field of anthropology. These include classic 19th century social theories (e.g., those of Durkheim, Weber, Marx), 20th century interpretive approaches (for example, structuralism), and contemporary modes of sociocultural analysis.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V2004
ANTH
2004
62145
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
J. Pemberton 33 [ More Info ]

ANTH V2010x Major Debates in the Study of Africa 3 pts.

ANTH V2100x Muslim Societies 3 pts. Examination of religion and society not limited to the Middle East. A series of Muslim societies of various types and locations will be approached historically and contextually to understand their family resemblances and their differences, their distinctive mechanisms of coherence and their patterns of contestation.

ANTH V3014x East Asian Societies and Cultures 3 pts. Introduction to the contemporary societies of China, Japan, and Korea, with special attention to social institutions and cultural patterns that shape hierarchy, egalitarianism, and inequality as reflected in family patterns, community life, religion, and economic behavior of social change.


Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology


EEEB W3030x or y (Section 001) The Biology, Systematics, and Evolutionary History of the 'Apes' 3 pts. Prerequisites: Open to undergraduates who have had V1010, V1011 or the equivalent. Other students who are interested should speak with the instructor. This course focuses on our closest relatives, the extant apes of Africa and Asia. We will explore the nature and extent of the morphological, genetic, and behavioral variability within and among these forms. Using this framework, we will then analyze questions of systematics and trace the evolutionary development of the hominiods during the Miocene, the epoch that saw the last common ancestor of today's gibbons, orang utans, gorillas, chimpanzees and humans. Maximum enrollment 25. [Taught every other year.]

Timing note: The course meets for 2 hours twice a week. Films are screened during the last 30 minute of each class and students must be able to stay for the entire time if they want to take the class.

EEEB W3030x or y (Section 001) The Biology, Systematics, and Evolutionary History of the 'Apes' 3 pts. Prerequisites: Open to undergraduates who have taken EEEB V1010, EEEB V1011 or the
equivalent. Other students who are interested should speak with the
instructor. Enrollment limited to 25. This course focuses on our closest relatives, the extant apes of Africa and Asia. We will explore the nature and extent of the morphological, genetic, and behavioral variability within and among these forms. Using this framework, we will then analyze questions of systematics and trace the evolutionary development of the hominiods during the Miocene, the epoch that saw the last common ancestor of today's gibbons, orang utans, gorillas, chimpanzees and humans. Maximum enrollment 25. [Taught every other year.]


Anthropology


ANTH V3040x Anthropological Theory I 4 pts. Prerequisites: Required of all Barnard Anthropology majors; open to other students with instructor's permission only. Enrollment limited to 40 students. * To be taken in conjunction with ANTH V3041, preferably in sequence. First of a two semester sequence intended to introduce departmental majors to key readings in social theory that have been constitutive of the rise and contemporary practice of modern anthropology. The goal is to understand historical and current intellectual debates within the discipline.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3040
ANTH
3040
09257
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
N. Abu El-Haj 20 / 30 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3043x The Anthropology of Religion and Society 3 pts.

ANTH V3160x The Body and Society 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor is required. Enrollment limited to 40. Introduction to medical anthropology, whose purpose is to explore health, affliction, and healing cross-culturally. Theory and methods from other fields will be drawn on to address critiques of biomedical, epidemiological, and other models of disease; the roles of healers in different societies; and different conceptions of the body and health.

ANTH V3465x Women and Gender in the Muslim World 3 pts. Practices like veiling that are central to Western images of women and Islam are also contested issues throughout the Muslim world. Examines debates about Islam and gender and explores the interplay of cultural, political, and economic factors in shaping women's lives in the Muslim world, from the Middle East to Southeast Asia.

ANTH V3883x Cultural, Biological, and Linguistic Diversity 4 pts. Today localities with high incidences of genetic, species, and ecosystem diversity more often than not map directly onto localities with high incidences of human cultural and linguistic diversity. These localities are generally in parts of the world that have been, until quite recently, at the frontiers of resource extraction, human migration and resettlement, and capital expansion. Extraction, migration, and economic expansion tend to result in a decrease in both biological and cultural diversity. People living in these diverse areas often fall into the lowest categories of indicators for poverty and are often desirous of economic development. Equally often they are targeted for economic development interventions by expansionist states and resource-hungry businesses. Conservation organizations often target these localities for protection because of the various forms of diversity found in them and because they also often have high numbers of species with restricted ranges.

ANTH V3917x Social Theory and Radical Critique in Ethnic Studies 4 pts.

ANTH V3921x Anti-Colonialism 4 pts.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3921
ANTH
3921
61981
001
M 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
D. Scott 20 / 20 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3922x Colloquium: The Emergence of Human Society 4 pts.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3922
ANTH
3922
65562
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
T. D'Altroy 2 / 25 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3939y Millennial Futures: Mass Culture and Japan 4 pts. Addresses mass culture and its relationship with Japan at the end of the century, as it anticipates the continuation of millennial anxieties and fantasies into the 21st century. With one of the most developed, mass-mediated formations in the world, Japan becomes a compelling instance of late modernity, non-western, yet not. With ethnographic sensibilities, approaches such thematic domains as everyday orderliness, criminality and terror, gender and sexuality, and money and consumption through the media of print, video, film, sound recordings, and photography. Theoretical works in mass cultural criticism and Japan-specific readings are paired with weekly seminar discussions.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3939
ANTH
3939
87448
001
Tu 2:10p - 4:00p
963 SCHERMERHORN HALL
M. Ivy 3 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3954x Bodies and Machines 4 pts. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students. Examines how bodies become mechanized and machines embodied. Studies shifts in the status of the human under conditions of capitalist commodification and mass mediation. Readings consist of works on the fetish, repetition and automaticity, reification, and late modern techno prosthesis.

ANTH V3969x Specters of Culture 4 pts. Pursues the spectral effects of culture in the modern. Through a consideration of anthropologically significant, primarily non-western sites and various domains of social creation�performance, ritual practice, narrative production, technological invention�traces the ghostly remainders of cultural machineries, circuitries of voice, and representational forms crucial to modern discourse networks.

ANTH V3970x Biological Basis of Human Variation 4 pts. Prerequisites: ANTH V1010. Permission of instructor required. Examination of the biological data for modern human diversity at the molecular, phenotypical, and behavioral levels, as distributed geographically.

ANTH V3971x Environment and Cultural Behavior 4 pts. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students. Examines human understandings and transformations of nature, drawing on theories of the relationship between nature and culture and the social production and construction of nature. Analyzes contemporary environmental use, conservation projects, and environmentally focused ethnographic writing. Demonstrates the relationship between nature ideologies and productions, and the social, economic, and environmental politics they engender.

ANTH V3974x Lost Worlds, Secret Spaces: Modernity and the Child 4 pts.

ANTH V3976x Anthropology of Science 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required. Examines debates in the social studies of science, beginning with a focus on questions of epistemology and analyzing the significance of social interests, laboratory and social practices, and "culture(s)" in the making of scientific knowledge. The course then turns to consider the role of the sciences in fashioning larger social worlds.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3976
ANTH
3976
04873
001
Th 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
N. Abu El-Haj 0 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3979x Fluent Bodies 4 pts. The recent proliferation of writings on the social significations of the human body have brought to the fore the epistemological, disciplinary, and ideological structures that have participated in creating a dimension of the human body that goes beyond its physical consideration. The course, within the context of anthropology, has two considerations, a historical one and a contemporary one. If anthropology can be construed as the study of human society and culture, then, following Marcel Mauss, this study must be considered the actual, physical bodies that constitute the social and the cultural.

ANTH V3980x Nationalism: History and Theory 4 pts. Covers the basic readings in the contemporary debate over nationalism and different disciplinary approaches and looks at recent studies of nationalism in the formerly colonial world as well as in the industrial West. The readings offer a mix of both theoretical and empirical studies, including the following: Eric Hobsbawn: Nationalism since 1700; Ernest Gillner: Nations and Nationalism; Benedict Anderson: Imagined Communities; Antony Smith: The Ethic Origins of Nations; Linda Coley: Britons; Peter Sahlins: Boundaries; and Partha Chatterjee: The Nation and Its Fragments.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3980
ANTH
3980
64289
001
Tu 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
P. Chatterjee 8 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3989x Urban Anthropology 4 pts. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18 students.

ANTH W4042x or y Agent, Person, Subject, Self 3 pts. Treats the interrelated notions of agent, person, subject, and self from a semiotic and social perspective.

ANTH V1002x and y The Interpretation of Culture 3 pts. Registration for discussion sections will occur during the first week of class. The anthropological approach to the study of culture and human society. Case studies from ethnography are used in exploring the universality of cultural categories (social organization, economy, law, belief system, art, etc.) and the range of variation among human societies. Discussion Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V1002
ANTH
1002
04478
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
P. West 48 / 120 [ More Info ]

ANTH V1007x The Origins of Human Society 3 pts. Mandatory Recitations sections and $25.00 laboratory fee. An archaeological perspective on the evolution of human social life from the first bipedal step of our ape ancestors to the establishment of large sedentary villages. While traversing six million years and six continents, our explorations will lead us to consider such major issues as the development of human sexuality, the origin of language, the birth of "art" and religion, the domestication of plants and animals, and the foundations of social inequality. Designed for anyone who happens to be human.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V1007
ANTH
1007
62549
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 5 [ More Info ]

ANTH V1009x Introduction to Language and Culture 3 pts. This is an introduction to the study of the production, interpretation, and reproduction of social meanings as expressed through language. In exploring language in relation to culture and society, it focuses on how communication informs and transforms the sociocultural environment.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V1009
ANTH
1009
09332
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
S. Scott 18 / 60 [ More Info ]

ANTH V2004x Introduction to Social and Cultural Theory 3 pts. Introduces students to crucial theories of society, paying particular attention to classic social theory of the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Traces a trajectory through writings essential for an understanding of the social: from Saussure, Durkheim, Mauss, Marx, Freud, and Weber, on to the structuralist ethnographic elaboration of Claude Levi-Strauss, the historiographic reflections on modernity of Michel Foucault, and contemporary modes of socio-cultural analysis. Explored are questions of signification at the heart of anthropological inquiry, and to the historical contexts informing these questions. Discussion Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V2004
ANTH
2004
62145
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
J. Pemberton 33 [ More Info ]

ANTH V2008x Film and Culture 3 pts. The class explores the intersection of aesthetics and ethnography in contemporary nonfiction filmmaking. Course readings address the blurring of boundaries between filmic genres and the multiplicity of relationships they establish between the "pro-filmic" and the filmic; the ethics as well as the epistemology of visual and auditory representations and the relationships that are put into play between films' subjects, their makers, and their audiences in a variety of cultural contexts, the social life of images, and the relationship between anthropological knowledge and various documentary modalities.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V2008
ANTH
2008
18523
001
Tu 6:10p - 9:00p
TBA
M. McLagan 22 / 100 [ More Info ]

ANTH V2015x Chinese Society and Culture (formerly ANTH V3015) 3 pts. Social organization and social change in China from late imperial times to the present. Major topics include family, kinship, community, stratification, and the relationships between the state and local society.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V2015
ANTH
2015
14969
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
M. Cohen 5 [ More Info ]

ANTH V2400x Culture and Finance 3 pts. This class will construct a dual perspective on the intersection between culture and finance: On the one hand, we will be concerned with finance as a culturally constituted social field; on the other, we will examine the far-reaching sociocultural consequences of financial practices. Students will write four short papers, each corresponding to one of the four thematic sections of the class-Money and Exchange; Debt, Credit, and Value; The Production and Productivity of Risk; and Cultures of Crisis.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V2400
ANTH
2400
24711
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
S. Muir 12 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3040x Anthropological Theory I (formerly ANTH V3011 Social Relations: Living in Society) 4 pts. open to majors; all others with instructor's permission. Enrollment is 15. Prerequisite: an introductory course in anthropology. Institutions of social life. Kinship and locality in the structuring of society. Monographs dealing with both literate and nonliterate societies will be discussed in the context of anthropological fieldwork methods. (This course is open to anthropology majors; others require advanced permission of the instructor)

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3040
ANTH
3040
09257
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
N. Abu El-Haj 20 / 30 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3064x Death and the Body 3 pts. $25.00 mandatory laboratory fee This class explores the ways in which archaeologists use the dead body to explore past beliefs and social practices, critically assessing these approaches from the broader perspective of anthropological and sociological theories of the body's production and constitution. We'll look at the ways in which social status, gender and personhood are expressed through the dead body and through practices of body modification and display. In this context we'll also consider the social relations of archaeological exhumation, the conflict that can arise over the excavation of human remains, and their treatment as courtroom evidence in forensic archaeology.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3064
ANTH
3064
11355
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
Z. Crossland 26 / 70 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3120x Historical Rituals in Latin America 3 pts. Requirements: Undergraduate majors. Enrollment is 60 Anthropologists and historians of literacy and communication have emphasized the reliance on multivocal imagery in the organization of social and political life in Latin America. Historically, the salient role of image and of ritual in political ritual was fed by the chasm between literate and illiterate segments of the population. During the twentieth century, however, the rise of mass politics on one hand, and television and other visual media on the other, gave a new lease on the vibrant relevance of historical ritual and myth in local polticial life. This course explores the role of religious and secular ritual and myth in framing historical processes. It makes special emphasis on the use of Catholic ritual, imagery, and mythology in the European conquest and colonization of the continent, and in revolution, nationbuilding, civic life, and sexual politics, since the 19tr century.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3120
ANTH
3120
15375
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
C. Lomnitz 5 / 60 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3126x Imagining the City 3 pts. This course explores the various ways in which cities are planned, represented and navigated, and interrogates collectively imagined forms of social life and social order as they are reflected in urban design. By pairing fiction films and documentaries with readings from anthropology, sociology, history and literary criticim, we will discuss the role of planning, speculation, technology and nostalgia in defining and conceptualizing the city.

ANTH V3721x Spatial Analysis in Archaeology 4 pts. This is an advanced course in spatial modeling developed specifically for Anthropology students, particularly those pursuing a degree through the inter-departmental Archaeology program. This course will provide a foundation for understanding a variety of issues related to spatial analysis and modeling. Students will explore the concepts, tools, and techniques of GIS modeling and review and critique its application within archaeology. The course will also offer students the opportunity to design, build and evaluate their own spatial analyses. We will draw from a wide range of examples including trade and exchange networks in Greece, placement of shrines and homes in the pre-Hispanic American Southwest, and the imposition of power within sacred spaces at Angkor Wat in Cambodia. The course will consist of lectures, reading assignments, lab assignments, and a final project. Priority given to senior and juniors.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3721
ANTH
3721
60822
001
Th 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
M. Sanger 1 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3810x Madagascar 4 pts. Enrollment limit is 15. Prerequisites: Non-Anthropology majors require the instructor's permission. Critiques the many ways the great Red Island has been described and imagined by explorers, colonists, social scientists, and historians-as an Asian-African amalgamation, an ecological paradise, and a microcosm of the Indian Ocean. Religious diasporas, mercantilism, colonization, enslavement, and race and nation define key categories of comparative analysis.

ANTH V3821x Native America (formerly V3090) 4 pts. Enrollment limit is 40. This is an undergraduate seminar that takes up primary and secondary sources and reflections to a) provide students with an historical overview of Native American issues and representational practices b) provide students with an understanding of the ways in which land expropriation and concomitant military and legal struggle have formed the core of Native-State relations and are themselves central to American and Native American history and culture c) provide students with an understanding of Native representational practices, political subjectivity and aspiration. Global Core.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3821
ANTH
3821
68567
001
Tu 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
A. Simpson 0 / 40 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3826x Brain Science: A Social History 4 pts. Enrollment limit is 20 Corequisites: Open to Juniors and Seniors only In light of the current ascendance of neuroscience, including new federally funded initiatives to map the human brain, this course explores the social historyof brain science from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. This period saw the invention of an array of cerebral technologies designed to explain the brain's operations, measure its capacities, manipulate its contents, calm its agitations, and better its performance. In this course, we will examine the historical and political contexts in which suchtechnologies, including psychoanalysis, psychosurgery, brainwashing, and psychGpharmaceuticals, were created. At the same time, we will considerthe medical doctors, psychologists, and military personnel who endorsed and deployed them to achieve various social, political, and therapeutic ends. Through readings of period scientific texts, contemporary scientific research, personal memoirs and novels, we will analyze the connections between emergent cerebral technologies and dominant philosophies of consciousness, notions of mind and soul, and theories of intelligence. In addition, we will look at the constructon of the neurological patient through the lenses of culture, race and gender. Finally, we will consider recent cerebral technologies that produce mages of the brain. Throughout the course, we investigate persisting and urgent interests in knowing the mind, enhancing mental functioning, and managing problem brains.

ANTH V3861x Anthropology of the Anthropocene 4 pts. Enrollment limit is 20. Priority given to Majors in Anthropology This course focuses on the political ecology of the anthropocene. As multiple publics become increasingly aware of the extensive and accelerated rate of current global environmental change, and the presence of anthropogenesis in ever expanding circumstances, we need to critically analyze the categories of thought and action being developed in order to carefully approach this change. Our concern is thus not so much the Anthropocene as an immutable fact, inevitable event, or definitive period of time {significant though these are) but rather for the political, social, and intellectual consequences of this important idea. Thus we seek to understand the creativity of "The Anthropocene" as a political, rhetorical, and social category. We also aim to examine the networks of capital and power that have given rise to the current state of planetary change, the strategies for ameliorating those changes, and how these are simultaneously implicated in the rhetorical creation of "The Anthropocene"

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3861
ANTH
3861
08283
001
W 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
P. West 5 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3872x From Physics Labs to Oil Futures: Social Studies of Energy 4 pts. Enrollment limited is 15 How did whale oil become replaced by fossil fuels? What were the turning points in implementing electricity networks within urban centers? What is the role of markets and industries when producing such new energy infrastructures? This interdisciplinary course will trace ideas of energy in anthropology, science and technology studies, literary studies and
environmental history, and investigate how energy production and consumption affects social life.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3872
ANTH
3872
24816
001
Tu 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
G. Gunel 4 / 15 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3873x LANGUAGE AND POLITICS 4 pts. Language is central to political process. While all agree that language is used to symbolize or express political action, the main focus of this course is on how language and other communicative practices contribute to the creation of political stances, events, and forms of order. Topics addressed include political rhetoric and ritual, political communication and publics, discrimination and hierarchy, language and the legitimation of authority, as well as the role of language in nationalism, state formation, and in other sociopolitical movements like feminism and diasporic communities. Since this course has the good fortune of coinciding with the 2012 U.S. Presidential election, we will make significant use of campaign rhetorics as a means of illustrating and exploring various themes.

ANTH V3921x Anticolonialism 4 pts. Enrollment limit is 20. Through a careful exploration of the argument and style of three vivid anticolonial texts, C.L.R. James' The Black Jacobins, Aimé Césaire's Discourse on Colonialism, Albert Memmi's Colonizer and Colonized, and Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth, this course aims to inquire into the construction of the image of colonialism and its projected aftermaths established in anti-colonial discourse.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3921
ANTH
3921
61981
001
M 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
D. Scott 20 / 20 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3922x The Emergence of State 4 pts. The creation of the earliest states out of simpler societies was a momentous change in human history. This course examines major theories proposed to account for that process, including population pressure, warfare, urbanism, class conflict, technological innovation, resource management, political conflict and cooperation, economic specialization and exchange, religion/ideology, and information processing.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3922
ANTH
3922
65562
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
T. D'Altroy 2 / 25 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3926x Rewriting Modernity: Transculturation and the Postcolonial Intellectual 4 pts. This course is an examination of how postcolonial intellectuals have participated in the creation and contesting of alternative/multiple/'fugitive' modernities.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3926
ANTH
3926
22945
001
Th 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
H. Mokoena 8 / 20 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3933x Arabia Imagined 4 pts. This course explores Arabia as a global phenomenon. It is organized around primary texts read in English translation. The site of the revelation of the Quran and the location of the sacred precincts of Islam, Arabia is the destination of pilgrimage and the direction of prayer for Muslims worldwide. It also is the locus of cultural expression ranging from the literature of the 1001 Nights to the broadcasts of Al Jazeera. We begin with themes of contemporary youth culture and political movements associated with the Arab Spring. Seminar paper. Global Core.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3933
ANTH
3933
27735
001
Tu 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
B. Messick 25 / 30 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3939x The Anime Effect: Media and Technoculture in Japan 4 pts. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission Culture, technology, and media in contemporary Japan. Theoretical and ethnographic engagements with forms of mass mediation, including anime, manga, video, and cell-phone novels. Considers larger global economic and political contexts, including post-Fukushima transformations. Major Cultures Requirement: East Asian Civilization List Major Cultures Requirement: East Asian Civilization List B.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3939
ANTH
3939
87448
001
Tu 2:10p - 4:00p
963 SCHERMERHORN HALL
M. Ivy 3 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3949x Sorcery and Magic 4 pts. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Enrollment limit is 20. In considering philosophical, aesthetic, and political aspects of sorcery in contemporary and historical settings, also considers the implications of postmodernism for anthropological theorizing as itself a form of sorcery.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3949
ANTH
3949
72843
001
W 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
M. Taussig 16 / 30 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3970x Biological Basis of Human Variation 4 pts. Enrollment limited to 15 students and instructor's permission required Prerequisites: ANEB V1010 and permission of the instructor. Biological evidence for the modern human diversity at the molecular, phenotypical, and behavioral levels, as distributed geographically.

ANTH V3976x Anthropology and Science 4 pts.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3976
ANTH
3976
04873
001
Th 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
N. Abu El-Haj 0 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3980x Nationalism 4 pts. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. This course will cover the basic readings in the contemporary debate over nationalism. It will cover different disciplinary approaches and especially look at recent studies of nationalism in the formerly colonial world as well as in the industrial West. The readings will offer a mix of both theoretical and empirical studies. The readings include the following: 1) Eric Hobsbawn: Nationalism since 1700; 2) Ernest Gillner: Nations ans Nationalism; 3) Benedict Anderson: Imagined Communities; 4) Antony Smith: The Ethnic Origins of Nations; 5) Linda Coley: Britons; 6) Peter Sahlins: Boundaries and 7) Partha Chatterjee; The Nation and Its Fragments. Prerequisite: intended for seniors but not necessarily anthropology majors.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3980
ANTH
3980
64289
001
Tu 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
P. Chatterjee 8 [ More Info ]

ANTH W3997x Supervised Individual Research Course In Anthropology 2-6 pts. Prerequisite: the written permission of the staff member under whose supervision the research will be conducted.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH W3997
ANTH
3997
71119
001
TBA B. Boyd 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
22173
002
TBA M. Cohen 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
10014
003
TBA M. Combs-Schilling 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
77380
004
TBA Z. Crossland 1 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
10705
005
TBA T. D'Altroy 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
75703
006
TBA E. Daniel 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
69899
007
TBA Instructor To Be Announced 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
27236
008
TBA C. Fennell 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
17195
010
TBA M. Ivy 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
11506
011
TBA Z. Wool 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
25100
014
TBA E. Marakowitz 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
20569
015
TBA H. Mokoena 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
29529
016
TBA R. Morris 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
73141
017
TBA J. Pemberton 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
14935
018
TBA E. Povinelli 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
15455
019
TBA N. Rothschild 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
73218
021
TBA P. Chatterjee 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
76589
022
TBA K. Seeley 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
68663
023
TBA A. Simpson 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
70129
024
TBA M. Taussig 1 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
60803
026
TBA L. Abu-Lughod 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
12203
029
TBA R. Holloway 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
67449
031
TBA S. Gregory 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
21840
032
TBA B. Messick 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
65735
033
TBA M. Mamdani 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
62655
034
TBA D. Scott 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
71430
036
TBA C. Lomnitz 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
29609
037
TBA M. McLagan 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
74238
038
TBA N. Rothschild 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
13769
039
TBA S. Muir 0 [ More Info ]
ANTH
3997
27227
044
TBA G. Gunel 0 [ More Info ]

ANTH V3999x and y The Senior Thesis Seminar in Anthropology 4 pts. Prerequisites: The instructor's permission via email at mec3@columbia.edu Students interested in the two semester senior thesis course in anthropology should attend the first session of the seminar to discuss the possibility of joining the course. Students must have at least a 3.6 GPA in the major and a preliminary project concept in order to become a part of the seminar. Professor Elaine Combs-Schilling and Teaching Associate, Manuel Schwab jointly teach this advanced seminar. Each student's 2 semester project takes place over the fall and spring and is intended to result in a project that will culminate in a 40-50 page thesis in consultation with professors and advisors. An "in progress mark" will be allocated at the end of the fall semester for those students remaining in the senior thesis course. The final grade for the fall-spring academic year must be completed before a qualitative grade is assigned. The grade allocated at the end of the second term will become the grade for the entire course.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH V3999
ANTH
3999
24208
001
F 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
M. Combs-Schilling 4 / 17 [ More Info ]

ANTH G4147x (Section 001) Human Skeletal Biology I 3 pts. Enrollment limited to 15 students and instructor's permission required Recommended for archaeology and physical anthropology students, pre-meds, and biology majors interested in the human skeletal system. Intensive study of human skeletal materials using anatomical and anthropological landmarks to assess sex, age, and ethnicity of bones. Other primate skeletal materials and fossil casts used for comparative study (Enrollment limit 12 and Instructor's Permission required)

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANTH G4147
ANTH
4147
22615
001
W 12:10p - 2:00p
TBA
R. Holloway 7 / 12 [ More Info ]

Applied Physics


APPH E4200x Physics of fluids 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisite: APMA E3102 or equivalent; PHYS 1401 or 1601 or equivalent. An introduction to the physical behavior of fluids for science and engineering students. Derivation of basic equations of fluid dynamics: conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. Dimensional analysis. Vorticity. Laminar boundary layers. Potential flow. Effects of compressibility, stratification, and rotation. Waves on a free surface; shallow water equations. Turbulence.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: APPH E4200
APPH
4200
12200
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
M. Mauel 4 / 35 [ More Info ]

Applied Physics & Applied Math


APAM E4901x Seminar: problems in applied mathematics 0 pts. Lect: 1. This course is required for, and can be taken only by, all applied mathematics majors in the junior year. Prerequisites or corequisites: APMA E4200 and E4204 or their equivalents. Introductory seminars on problems and techniques in applied mathematics. Typical topics are nonlinear dynamics, scientific computation, economics, operations research, etc.


Applied Physics


APPH E4901x Seminar: problems in applied physics 1 pt. Lect: 1. This course is required for, and can be taken only by, all applied physics majors and minors in the junior year. Discussion of specific and self-contained problems in areas such as applied electrodynamics, physics of solids, and plasma physics. Topics change yearly.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: APPH E4901
APPH
4901
21854
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 9 / 50 [ More Info ]

Applied Mathematics


APMA E4903x Seminar: problems in applied mathematics 3-4 pts. Lect: 1. Tutorial: 2. This course is required for all applied mathematics majors in the senior year. Prerequisites or corequisites: APMA E4200 and E4204 or their equivalents. For 4 pts. credit, term paper required. Examples of problem areas are nonlinear dynamics, asymptotics, approximation theory, numerical methods, etc. Approximately three problem areas are studied per term.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: APMA E4903
APMA
4903
11831
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
C. Wiggins 20 / 50 [ More Info ]

Applied Physics


APPH E4903x Seminar: problems in applied physics 2 pts. Lect: 1. Tutorial:1. This course is required for, and can be taken only by, all applied physics majors in the senior year. Discussion of specific and self-contained problems in areas such as applied electrodynamics, physics of solids, and plasma physics. Formal presentation of a term paper required. Topics change yearly.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: APPH E4903
APPH
4903
18339
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 10 / 50 [ More Info ]

African American Studies


AFAS C1001x (Section 001) Introduction to African-A,merican Studies 3 pts. Global Core Course From the arrival of enslaved Africans to the recent election of President Barack Obama, black people have been central the story of the United States, and the Americas, more broadly. African Americans have been both contributors to, and victims of, this "New World" democratic experiment. To capture the complexities of this ongoing saga, this course offers an inter-disciplinary exploration of the development of African American cultural and political life in the U.S., but also in relationship to the different African diasporic outposts of the Atlantic world. The course will be organized both chronologically and thematically, moving from the "middle passage" to the present so-called "post-racial" moment-drawing on a range of classical texts, primary sources, and more recent secondary literature-to grapple with key questions, concerns and problems (i.e. agency, resistance, culture, structure, etc.) that have preoccupied scholars of African American history, culture and politics. Students will be introduced to range of disciplinary methods and theoretical approaches (spanning the humanities and social sciences), while also attending to the critical tension between intellectual work and everyday life, which are central to the formation of African-American Studies as an academic field. This course will engage specific social formations (i.e. migration, urbanization, globalization, diaspora, etc), significant cultural/political developments (i.e. uplift ideologies, nationalism, feminism, pan-Africanism, religion/spirituality, etc), and hallmark moments/movements (i.e. Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights movement, Black Power, etc). By the end of the semester students will be expected to possess a working knowledge of major themes/figures/traditions, alongside a range of cultural/political practices and institutional arrangements, in African American Studies. Discussion Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AFAS C1001
AFAS
1001
24084
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
J. Sorett 28 / 62 [ More Info ]

AFAS W3030x (Section 0001) African American Music 3 pts. This course focuses on a central question: how do we define "African American music"? In attempting to answer this question, we will be thinking through concepts such as authenticity, representation, recognition, cultural ownership, appropriation, and origin(s). These concepts have structured the ways in which critics, musicians and audiences have addressed the various social, political and aesthetic contexts in which African American music has been composed (produced), performed (re-produced) and heard (consumed).

AFAS C3930x (Section 001) Topics in the Black Experience: Honey is my Knife-African Spirituality in the Americas 4 pts. This seminar will investigate the cultural contributions of Africans in the formation of the contemporary Americas. There will be a particular focus on the African religious traditions that have continued and developed in spite of hostile social and political pressures. Because of their important roles in the continuations of African aesthetics, the areas of visual art, music and dance will be emphasized in the exploration of the topic. This seminar will also discuss two important African ethnic groups: the Yoruba of Southwestern Nigeria, and the Bakongo of Central Africa. It will highlight the American religious traditions of these cultures, e.g., Candomblé Nago/Ketu, Santeria/Lucumi, Shango, Xangô, etc., for the Yoruba, and Palo Mayombe, Umbanda, Macumba, Kumina, African-American Christianity, etc., for the Bakongo and other Central Africans. In the course discussions, the Americas are to include Brazil, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, the United States and numerous other appropriate locations. There will also be a focus on visual artists like Charles Abramson, Jose Bedia, Juan Boza, Lourdes Lopez, Manuel Mendive, etc., whose works are grounded in African based religions. In addition, we will explore how African religious philosophy has impacted on every-day life in the Americas, for example in the areas of international athletics, procedures of greeting and degreeting, culinary practices, etc. Honey is My Knife: African Spirituality in the Americas will include presentations by three innovative guest scholars: The seminar will include an extensive use of audio-visual materials including slides, videos and audio recordings.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AFAS C3930
AFAS
3930
74977
001
Tu 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
C. Dawson 5 / 12 [ More Info ]

AFAS C3930x (Section 002) Topics in the Black Experience: Hip Hop & Social Inequality 4 pts. Sophmore , Junior , Senior Only This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to understanding contemporary social ills through the lens of Hip-Hop culture. Issues like race, class, gender, poverty and sexuality are common concerns in the wider social world, but Hip-Hop has provided unique articulations of and responses to these issues. Hip-Hop often "gives voice" to the voiceless, at the same time, Hip-Hop has been a site for inequality. We will explore the degree to which Hip-Hop is or can be a social change agent. This course will expose students to the field of Hip-Hop Studies, issues in urban America, and international perspectives on Hip-Hop culture.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AFAS C3930
AFAS
3930
16604
002
W 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
R. Lewis 15 / 15 [ More Info ]

AFAS G4080x (Section 002) Topics in the Black Experience: Beyond Civil Rights:Martin Luther King &the Case for Radical Democracy 4 pts. open to 3rd & 4th year undergrads ONLY; Graduate Students When Martin Luther King, Jr., proclaimed, "America, you must be born again," he was speaking in much more than religious or even racial terms. Clearly he had in mind something long sought for but not yet achieved: a truly democratic America ruled by the demos, the people, rather than by the entrenched forces of capital. For King, a "reborn" America meant a radical reconfiguration of the priorities of market-driven capitalism, which he believed distorted the human personality and moral values; a serious consideration of key aspects of democratic socialism, which he felt was crucial for a truly just political economy; a more comprehensive economic safety net that would allow every American to live with dignity and without want; and a body politic and policy-making process based on uncompromising moral principles rather than political expediency. Using King's writings, sermons, speeches and historical accounts of his deeds and strategies, as well as key readings in political economy, religion, and basic political theory, we will explore the implications of King's vision for today and the kinds of policies and social actions implicit in his vision that could make today's America more politically, socially and economically just - in other words, a more fair and democratic democracy for all Americans. Course Requirements Apart from the usual requirements of being prepared to fully participate in seminar discussions, at least three times during the semester each student must post a "commentary" on the Columbia CourseWorks website. The "commentary" should be at least 150 words in length. It may contain your thoughts about issues discussed in a previous class meeting, reflections on particular assigned readings, or a continuation of an exchange of opinions generated by another student's commentary. Attendance, class participation and three "commentaries" will comprise 25 percent of your final grade. Each student will be required to introduce one week's topic and readings. The presentation can be a creative as you choose, but in some way it must: 1) summarize the main points of the week's readings; 2) articulate three significant questions inspired by the readings or 3) present an argument against some aspect of the readings with which you disagree. 25 percent of final grade. A final paper or project of 15-20 pages on a topic of your choosing, with the approval of the professor. 50 percent of final grade.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AFAS G4080
AFAS
4080
61074
002
Tu 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
O. Hendricks 0 / 14 [ More Info ]

Architecture


ARCH V1010x (Section 01) Design Futures: New York City 3 pts. How does design operate in our lives? What is our design culture? In this course, we explore the many scales of design in contemporary culture -- from graphic design to architecture to urban design to global, interactive, and digital design. The format of this course moves between lectures, discussions, collaborative design work and field trips in order to engage in the topic through texts and experiences.

ARCH V1020x and y Introduction To Architectural Design and Visual Culture 3 pts. Corequisites: Intended for the non-major, sophomore year and above. Enrollment limited to 18 students. Introductory design studio to introduce students to architectural design through readings and studio design projects. Intended to develop analytic skills to critique existing media and spaces. Process of analysis used as a generative tool for the students' own design work. Attendance is mandatory at the first class meeting in order to form class registration lists.

ARCH V3101x or y Architectural Representation: Abstraction 4 pts. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students per section. Recommended for the sophomore year. Students work in a studio environment. Introduction to design through analysis of abstract architectural space and form. Emphasis on the design process and principles of representations through architectural drawing and model making. Attendance is mandatory at the first class meeting in order to form class registration lists.

ARCH V3103x or y Architectural Representation: Perception 4 pts. Prerequisites: Students work in a studio environment. Recommended for the sophomore year. Enrollment limited to 16 students per section. Introduction to design through studies in the perception of architectural space and form. Emphasis on exploratory, inventive processes for the generation, development, and representation of ideas in a variety of media. Attendance is mandatory at the first class meeting in order to form class registration lists.

ARCH V3114y Making the Metropolis: Urban Design and Theories of the City since 1850 3 pts. Introduces the project of understanding modern cities, focusing on theories, practices and examples in Europe and North America since 1850. The global reach of Euro-American ideas will also be examined. There are two primary goals: to investigate diverse strategies of urban development and to evaluate the social implications of built form. Course material includes built projects as well as unbuilt and theoretical work, all of which shaped how architects and planners interpreted the city.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ARCH V3114
ARCH
3114
03520
001
TBA Instructor To Be Announced 12 [ More Info ]

ARCH V3201x Architectural Design, I 4.5 pts. Prerequisites: ARCH V3101 and ARCH V3103. Open to architecture majors or with permission of instructor. Introduction to architectural design taught in a studio environment, through a series of design projects requiring drawings and models. Field trips, lectures, and discussions are organized in relation to studio exercises. Portfolio of design work from Architectural Representation: Abstraction and Perception will be reviewed the first week of classes.

ARCH V3211x Architectural Design, III 4.5 pts. Prerequisites: ARCH V3202 and permission of the department chair. Enrollment limited as space permits. Further exploration of the design process through studio work. Programs of considerable functional, contextual, and conceptual complexity are undertaken. Portfolio required for review first day of fall semester or earlier, as requested by the department. Class list based on portfolio review will be formed by first class meeting.

ARCH V3290x Curating Architecture 3 pts. This class will examine curating practices in relation to architectural exhibitions and publications. We will look at exhibitions, pavilions, installations, magazines, journals, boogazines, websites, and blogs (among other platforms) not only as mechanisms for presenting and distributing information but also as sites that serve as an integral part of architectural theory and practice.

ARCH V3312x and y Special Topics In Architecture 3 pts. Topics vary yearly. Course may be repeated for credit. Attendance is mandatory at the first class meeting in order to form class registration lists.

ARCH V3901x or y Senior Seminar 4 pts. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students per section. Open to architecture majors only unless space permits. Readings, individual class presentations, and written reports. Attendance is mandatory at the first class meeting in order to form class registration lists.

ARCH V3997x Independent Study 2-4 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the program director in term prior to that of independent study. Independent study form available at departmental office.


Art History


AHIS BC1001x Introduction to Art History I 4 pts. Attempting to offer an introduction to artistic creation on a global scale, this course is team-taught by specialists in a number of different cultural and historical traditions. In the fall semester we will discuss the art of Europe, the Middle East, India, Japan, and China, in periods ranging from the Paleolithic to the Renaissance. Museum trips are an integral part of the course. Note: weekly discussion groups to be arranged.Discussion Section Required. General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL). General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS). General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART). Discussion Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS BC1001
AHIS
1001
01791
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
M. O'Neil 12 [ More Info ]

AHIS BC2001x Drawing Studio: Empirical Studies 3 pts. Note course is limited to 15 students with instructor's permission on the first day of class. Drawing is a foundation for all other forms of visual art. This studio course is primarily a workshop augmented by home assignments, visiting artist lectures and museum/gallery visits. This class is open to all students from introductory to more advanced levels. The semester is divided into two sections: (1) Perspective and (2) The Body. Starting with perspective, the goal is to explore the history and contemporary importance of this form; then shift to the body, where the goal is to build a visual language that records the human form in space and in time. This course uses the practice of drawings as a tool to interrogate the meaning of observation in the practice of art.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS BC2001
AHIS
2001
04250
001
Tu 9:00a - 12:50p
TBA
L. Hewitt 0 [ More Info ]

AHIS BC2005x-BC2007x Painting I and III 3 pts. Course Limited to 15 Students. Permission of Instructor. Attend the first Class. This course will focus on individual and collaborative projects designed to explore the fundamental principles of image making. Students acquire a working knowledge of concepts in contemporary art through class critiques, discussion, and individual meetings with the professor. Reading materials will provide historical and philosophical background to the class assignments. Class projects will range from traditional to experimental and multi-media. Image collections will be discussed in class with an awareness of contemporary image production.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS BC2005
AHIS
2005
05809
001
W 2:10p - 6:00p
TBA
J. Snitzer 0 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS BC2007
AHIS
2007
04593
001
W 2:10p - 6:00p
TBA
J. Snitzer 0 [ More Info ]

AHIS BC3003x and y Supervised Projects in Photography 3 pts. Enrollment limited to 15 students. Instructor's permission required. Attend the first day of class. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students. Designed for students to conduct independent projects in photography. Priority for enrollment to the class will be Barnard College students who are enrolling in classes at ICP (International Center of Photography). The cost of ICP will be covered by Barnard College. All of the other students enrolling in the course (CC, GS SOA) will be responsible for their own ICP course expenses.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS BC3003
AHIS
3003
07389
001
M 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
N. Guagnini 0 [ More Info ]

AHIS V3203x Arts of Japan 3 pts. Survey of Japanese art from the Neolithic through the Edo period, with emphasis on Buddhist art, scroll painting, decorative screens, and wood-block prints.

AHIS BC3530x Advanced Studio 3 pts. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students. Permission of the instructor.

An interpretive study of the theoretical and critical issues in visual art. Projects that are modeled after major movements in contemporary art will be executed in the studio. Each student develops an original body of artwork and participates in group discussions of the assigned readings.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS BC3530
AHIS
3530
01726
001
M 2:10p - 6:00p
TBA
J. Snitzer 0 [ More Info ]

AHIS W3600x 19th Century Art 3 pts. The course examines selected topics in the history of European painting from the 1780s to 1900. It will explore a range of aesthetic, cultural and social issues through the work of major figures from David, Goya, and Turner to Manet, Seurat and Cezanne. This is a no laptop, no e-device course. Discussion Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS W3600
AHIS
3600
09977
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
A. Higonnet 13 / 100 [ More Info ]

AHIS BC3658x History and Theory of the Avant Garde 3 pts. Prerequisites: Courses in nineteenth- and/or twentieth-century art are recommended as prerequisites for this course. This course examines the idea and practice of artistic avant-gardism in Europe and the United States from the mid-nineteenth to the late-twentieth century. It explores the changing relationship of avant-gardism to bourgeois society, concepts of democracy, art institutions, political radicalism, and non-art forms of culture, such as mass culture and third-world cultures. It studies theories of the modernist, historical, and neo-avant-gardes.

AHIS BC3682y Early Modernism and the Crisis of Representation 3 pts. Prerequisites: 20th Century Art recommended. This course studies the emergence and development of Modernism in all of its complexity. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which Modern artists responded to the dramatically changing notions of space, time and dimension in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. What impact did these dramatic changes have on existing concepts of representation? What challenges did they pose for artists? To what extent did Modernism contribute to an understanding of the full consequences of these new ideas of time and space? These concerns will lead us to examine some of the major critical and historical accounts of modernism in the arts as they were developed between the 1860s and the 1920s.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS BC3682
AHIS
3682
05167
001
TuTh 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
A. Alberro 23 [ More Info ]

AHIS BC3926x Scared Landscapes of the Ancient Americas 4 pts. Course limited to 15 students with instrutor's permission. Seminar Application due April 10 2014. Please see BC AH website for further info. www.barnard.edu/arthist Course Description to Come

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS BC3926
AHIS
3926
01004
001
W 10:10a - 12:00p
TBA
M. O'Neil 0 [ More Info ]

AHIS BC3939x Contemporary Photography 4 pts. Undergraduate seminar course. Course limited to 15 Students with instructor's permission. Application process required. Applications are due in the Barnard Art History office April 7th. This undergraduate seminar will explore key texts that have informed the current condition and possibilities of the medium of photography.The course readings will consist of writings by critics and historians which reflect the unstable status of the photographic object between: technology and culture, mass culture and avant-garde art, discourse and documentation, analogue and digital.

AHIS BC3950y Photography and Video in Asia 4 pts. Course limited to 15 students with instrutor's permission. Seminar Application due April 10 2014. Please see BC AH website for further info. www.barnard.edu/arthist East Asia is now perhaps the world's most dynamic region, and its dramatic social and economic transformation has been mirrored in the work of a host of startlingly original and innovative visual artists. The class will explore the ideas and visual idioms that inform the leading contemporary photo artists in China, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. We will begin with a historical survey of the development of photography in East Asia since the mid-19th century, but we will concentrate on the period from 1960 to the present. Figures whose work will be explored include such Japanese artists and photographers as Eikoh Hosoe, Daido Moriyama, Tomatsu Shomei, Miyako Ishiuchi, Nobuyoshi Araki, Yasumasa Morimura, Moriko Mori, Naoya Hatakeyema, and Tomoko Sawada. From China, we will examine the work of artists like Zhang Huan, Hong Hao, Yang Fudong, Lin Tianmiao, and Xing Danwen, while Korean artists to be covered include Atta Kim andYeondoo Jung. Since many of these artists work regularly in video as well as photography, there will be regular video screenings throughout the semester.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS BC3950
AHIS
3950
04024
001
W 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
C. Phillips 1 [ More Info ]

AHIS BC3959x Senior Research Seminar 3 pts. Prerequisites: Course open to Barnard Art History majors only. Independent research for the senior thesis. Students develop and write their senior thesis in consultation with an individual faculty adviser in art history and participate in group meetings scheduled throughout the senior year.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS BC3959
AHIS
3959
07493
001
Tu 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
R. Deutsche 0 [ More Info ]

AHIS BC3968x Art/Criticism I 4 pts. course limited to 15 students with instrutor's permission. Seminar Application due April 10 2014. Please see BC AH website for further info. www.barnard.edu/arthist This course is a seminar on contemporary art criticism written by artists in the post war period. Such criticism differs from academic criticism because it construes art production less as a discrete object of study than as a point of engagement. It also differs from journalistic criticism because it is less obliged to report art market activity and more concerned with polemics. Art /Criticism I will trace the course of these developments by examining the art and writing of one artist each week. These will include Brian O'Doherty/Patrick Ireland, Allan Kaprow, Robert Morris, Yvonne Rainer, Robert Smithson, Art & Language, Dan Graham, Adrian Piper, Mary Kelly, Martha Rosler, Judith Barry and Andrea Fraser. We will consider theoretical and practical implications of each artist's oeuvre.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS BC3968
AHIS
3968
07232
001
Tu 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
N. Guagnini 2 [ More Info ]

AHIS BC3985x Introduction to Connoisseurship 4 pts. Course limited to 15 students with instrutor's permission. Seminar Application due April 10 2014. Please see BC AH website for further info. www.barnard.edu/arthist Factors involved in judging works of art, with emphasis on paintings; materials, technique, condition, attribution; identification of imitations and fakes; questions of relative quality.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: AHIS BC3985
AHIS
3985
05399
001
M 9:00a - 10:50a
TBA
M. Ainsworth 5 [ More Info ]

AHIS W4089x Native American Art and Culture 3 pts. This introduction to Native North American art surveys traditions of painting, sculpture, ceramics, textiles, photography and architecture and traces the careers of contemporary Indian modernists and postmodernists. It emphasizes artistic developments as a means of preserving culture and resisting domination in response to intertribal contact, European colonization and American expansion.


Astronomy


ASTR C1403x Earth, Moon and Planets (Lecture) 3 pts. Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: a working knowledge of high school algebra. The overall architecture of the solar system. Motions of the celestial sphere. Time and the calendar. Major planets, the earth-moon system, minor planets, comets. Life in the solar system and beyond. This course is similar to ASTR BC 1753. You cannot enroll in both courses and receive credit for both. Science Requirement: Partial Fulfillment.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ASTR C1403
ASTR
1403
66239
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
J. Applegate 34 [ More Info ]

ASTR C1610x Theories of the Universe: From Babylon to the Big Bang 3 pts. Milestones in the science of cosmology over the past 6000 years. Skylore and observation in ancient cultures. The twin revolutions of the Greeks: Pythagoras and Ptolemy. Aristotle, Aquinas, and the Great Chain of Being. The "scientific revolution": the impersonal and deterministic world-order of Newton, Laplace, and Kelvin. The erosion of that world-order by mathematics and experiment in the 20th century (relativity, quantum physics, dark matter, and the expanding universe). Today's searches for a new grand order in the Universe, which can cope-or maybe not-with these blows to yesterday's comfortable wisdom. Science Requirement: Partial Fulfillment.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ASTR C1610
ASTR
1610
72785
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
J. Patterson 43 [ More Info ]

ASTR BC1753x Life in the Universe 3 pts. Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: a working knowledge of high school algebra. Introduction to astronomy intended primarily for nonscience majors. Includes the history of astronomy; the apparent motions of the moon, sun, stars, and planets; gravitation and planetary orbits; the physics of the earth and its atmosphere; and the exploration of the solar system. This course is similar to ASTR C1403. You cannot enroll in both courses and receive credit for both. Science Requirement: Partial Fulfillment.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ASTR BC1753
ASTR
1753
05927
001
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
L. Kay 14 [ More Info ]

ASTR C1903x Astronomy Lab 1 1 pt. Laboratory for ASTR C1403. Projects include observations with the department's telescopes, computer simulation, laboratory experiments in spectroscopy, and the analysis of astronomical data. Lab 1 ASTR C1903 - goes with ASTR BC1753, ASTR C1403 or ASTR C1453.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ASTR C1903
ASTR
1903
05225
001
M 6:00p - 9:00p
TBA
L. Kay 0 / 14 [ More Info ]
ASTR
1903
04009
002
M 7:00p - 10:00p
TBA
L. Kay 0 / 14 [ More Info ]
ASTR
1903
02793
003
Tu 6:00p - 9:00p
TBA
L. Kay 0 / 14 [ More Info ]
ASTR
1903
01577
004
Tu 7:00p - 10:00p
TBA
L. Kay 0 / 14 [ More Info ]
ASTR
1903
09273
005
W 6:00p - 9:00p
TBA
L. Kay 0 / 14 [ More Info ]
ASTR
1903
00361
006
W 7:00p - 10:00p
TBA
L. Kay 0 / 14 [ More Info ]
ASTR
1903
09217
007
Th 6:00p - 9:00p
TBA
L. Kay 1 / 14 [ More Info ]

ASTR C1904y Astronomy Lab 2 1 pt. Laboratory for ASTR C1404. Projects include use of telescopes, laboratory experiments in the nature of light, spectroscopy, and the analysis of astronomical data. Lab 2 ASTR C1904 - goes with ASTR BC1754 or ASTR C1404 (or ASTR C1836).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ASTR C1904
ASTR
1904
03007
001
M 7:00p - 10:00p
TBA
L. Kay 0 / 12 [ More Info ]

ASTR C2001x Introduction To Astrophysics, I 3 pts. Prerequisites: A working knowledge of calculus. Corequisites: A course in calculus-based general physics. First term of a two-term calculus-based introduction to astronomy and astrophysics. Topics include the physics of stellar interiors, stellar atmospheres and spectral classifications, stellar energy generation and nucleosynthesis, supernovae, neutron stars, white dwarfs, and interacting binary stars. Science Requirement: Partial Fulfillment.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ASTR C2001
ASTR
2001
64283
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
F. Paerels 12 [ More Info ]

ASTR C2900x Frontiers of Astrophysics 1 pt. Several members of the faculty each offer a brief series of talks providing context for a current research topic in the field and then present results of their ongoing research. Opportunities for future student research collaboration are offered. Grading is Pass/Fail.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ASTR C2900
ASTR
2900
16967
001
F 10:10a - 11:25a
1332 PUPIN LABORATORIES
G. Bryan 9 [ More Info ]

ASTR C3101x Modern Stellar Astrophysics 3 pts. Prerequisites: one year of calculus-based general physics. Topics include the physics of stellar, structure, stellar atmospheres, nucleosynthesis, stellar evolution, interacting binary stars, white dwarfs, and neutron stars. Offered in alternate years.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ASTR C3101
ASTR
3101
20227
001
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
M. Agueros 2 [ More Info ]

ASTR C3105x Extrasolar Planets and Astrobiology (Lecture) 3 pts. Prerequisites: one year of calculus based physics. This class will cover the physics and observations of extrasolar planets at a quantitative level, including: detection methods, theories of planet formation and migration, orbital dynamics, rocky vs. gaseous planets, extrasolar planet atmospheres, and habitability, including possibly observable life signatures and some aspects of astrobiology. We will also cover several recent experimental results.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ASTR C3105
ASTR
3105
27657
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
Z. Haiman 7 [ More Info ]

ASTR C3996x Current Research in Astrophysics 1 pt. Prerequisites: Two semesters of Astronomy classes and two semesters of Physics classes. The goal of this course is to introduce Astronomy and Astrophysics majors to the methods and topics of current astronomical research. The course will also help with the development of critical thinking skills. Each week the topic of the course will be centered on the subject of the Astronomy department colloquium; this may include research on planets, stars, galaxies or cosmology. There will be two required meetings per week: the first to discuss papers related to the colloquium (time TBD), and the second the colloquium itself (at 4:15 pm each Wednesday). Grading is Pass/Fail.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ASTR C3996
ASTR
3996
66081
001
TBA G. Bryan 6 [ More Info ]

ASTR C3997x-C3998y Independent Research 3 pts. Prerequisites: This class requires the Instructor's permission to register. For an independent research project or independent study, a brief description of the proposed project or reading, with the supervising faculty member's endorsement, is required for registration. A variety of research projects conducted under the supervision of members of the faculty. Observational, theoretical, and experimental work in galactic and extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. The topic and scope of the work must be arranged with a faculty member in advance; a written paper describing the results of the project is required at its completion (note that a two-term project can be designed such that the grade YC is given after the first term). Senior majors in astronomy or astrophysics wishing to do a senior thesis should make arrangements in May of their junior year and sign up for a total of 6 points over their final two terms. Both a substantial written document and an oral presentation of thesis results are required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ASTR C3997
ASTR
3997
76878
001
TBA F. Paerels 1 [ More Info ]

Biochemistry


BCHM G4021x General Biochemistry 3 pts. Primarily for students in departments other than biochemistry. Prerequisite: general and organic chemistry. An integration, from a dynamic point of view, of cellular constituents with the chemical processes of living systems: chemistry and function, mode of synthesis and degradation by the cell, the characterization and role of particular enzymes and coenzymes in these reactions, and the mechanisms of oxidation and energy production. Nucleic acids, replication, and the genetic code are also discussed. (Given at the Morningside campus.)


Biology


BIOL BC1001x Revolutionary Concepts in Biology 4.5 pts. Prerequisites: Course does not fulfill Biology major requirements or premedical requirements. Enrollment in laboratory limited to 16 students per section. Exploration of the major discoveries and ideas that have revolutionized the way we view organisms and understand life. The basic concepts of cell biology, anatomy and physiology, genetics, evolution, and ecology will be traced from seminal discoveries to the modern era. The laboratory will develop these concepts and analyze biological diversity through a combined experimental and observational approach. Lab Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC1001
BIOL
1001
01719
001
MWF 9:00a - 9:50a
TBA
D. Heller 1 [ More Info ]
BIOL
1001
06014
002
MWF 9:00a - 9:50a
TBA
D. Heller 1 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC1500x Introduction to Organismal and Evolutionary Biology 3 pts. Prerequisites: BC1001 or equivalent preparation. Course suitable for fulfillment of premedical requirements. Detailed introduction to biological phenomena above the cellular level; development, anatomy, and physiology of plants and animals; physiological, population, behavioral, and community ecology; evolutionary theory; analysis of micro-evolutionary events; systematics.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC1500
BIOL
1500
06536
001
MWF 9:00a - 9:50a
TBA
P. Hertz 20 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC1501x Introductory Lab in Organismal and Evolutionary Biology 2 pts. Prerequisites: BIOL BC1001 or equivalent preparation. Enrollment limited to 16 students per section. Course suitable for fulfillment of premedical requirements. BIOL BC1500 as prerequisite or corequisite. A laboratory-based introduction to the major groups of living organisms; anatomy, physiology, evolution, and systematics; laboratory techniques for studying and comparing functional adaptations. Recitation Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC1501
BIOL
1501
02041
001
M 10:00a - 10:50a
TBA
J. Goldstein 0 [ More Info ]
BIOL
1501
08043
002
F 1:00p - 1:50p
TBA
J. Goldstein 2 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC2100x and y Molecular and Mendelian Genetics 3 pts. Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BC1501, BC1502, BC1503 or the equivalent. Mendelian and molecular genetics of both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, with an emphasis on human genetics. Topics include segregation, recombination and linkage maps, cytogenetics, gene structure and function, mutation, molecular aspects of gene expression and regulation, genetic components of cancer, and genome studies.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC2100
BIOL
2100
07322
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
B. Morton 6 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC2280x Animal Behavior 3 pts. Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BC1501, BC1502, BC1503 or equivalent. Introduction to animal behavior; physiological bases of behavior (sensory systems, neurophysiology of behavior, appetitive and reproductive behavior), ethological approaches to behavior (communication, territoriality, dominance, and aggression) and evolution of behavior (behavior genetics, behavioral ecology, sociobiology).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC2280
BIOL
2280
04248
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 9 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC2801x Laboratory in Genetics 3 pts. Prerequisites: BIOL BC1502, BC1503; and pre or corequisite, BC2100 or BC3310. Enrollment limited to 16 students per section. Exercises in genetics at both the Mendelian and molecular levels. Basic principles of genetic analysis will be studied using Drosophila and bacteria. A project in molecular genetics, involving such techniques as PCR, gel electrophoresis, and cloning, will be undertaken using plant genes.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC2801
BIOL
2801
06352
001
W 1:10p - 6:00p
TBA
B. Morton 4 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC3310x Cell Biology 3 pts. Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BC1501 BC1502, BC1503, or equivalent, and BC2100. This course explores the components, systems, and regulatory mechanisms involved in eukaryotic cellular function. Topics include: signal transduction, translational and protein quality control, organellar and cytoskeletal dynamics, and some coordinated responses such as proliferation and programmed cell death. Throughout the course we will see how general cell biology can be specialized to achieve specific cellular functions through regulation of the basic machinery. We will also explore the cellular and molecular bases for a variety of human pathologies, with an emphasis on cancer. In addition to lecture, we will spend some time discussing the material, including selected articles from the primary literature, and learning through group presentations.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC3310
BIOL
3310
06027
001
MW 8:40a - 9:55a
TBA
J. Snow 2 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC3311x Laboratory in Cell Biology 3 pts. Prerequisites: BIOL BC2100 OR BC3310 (which can be taken as corequisites) or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 16. Introduction to cell biological techniques used to investigate structural, molecular, and physiological aspects of eukaryotic cells and their organization into tissues. Techniques include light and electron microscopy, cell culture, isolation of cellular organelles, protein electrophoresis and Western Blot analysis.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC3311
BIOL
3311
05773
001
Tu 1:10p - 6:00p
TBA
J. Snow 2 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC3320x Microbiology 3 pts. Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BC1501, BC1502, BC1503 or the equivalent, and BC2100. Survey of the diversity, cellular organization, physiology, and genetics of the major microbial groups. Also includes aspects of applied microbiology and biotechnology, the function of microorganisms in the environment, and the role of microbes in human diseases.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC3320
BIOL
3320
08047
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 8 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC3352x Development 3 pts. Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BC1501, BC1502, BC1503, and BC2100 or equivalent. Introduction to developmental biology. Topics will include: fertilization, cleavage and gastrulation, establishment of body axes, neural development, organ formation, regeneration, stem cells and cell potency, evolution of developmental programs.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC3352
BIOL
3352
07283
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
J. Mansfield 1 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC3362y Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience 3 pts. Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BC1501, BC1502, BC1503 or the equivalent and one term of organic chemistry. Structure and function of neural membranes; ionic basis of membrane potential and action potential; synaptic transmission and neurochemistry; sensory transduction and processing; reflexes and spinal cord physiology; muscle structure and function; neuronal circuitry; nervous system development.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC3362
BIOL
3362
07300
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
E. Bauer 1 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC3380x Applied Ecology and Evolution 3 pts. Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BC1501, BC1502, BC1503 or equivalent. Ecological and evolutionary models of populations (exponential and density-dependent growth; species interactions; genetic differentiation resulting from mating, random drift, and selection) applied to problems resulting from human-induced environmental change (endangered species; use of pesticides and antibiotics; escaping transgenic organisms; global climate change; emerging pathogens; other invaders; etc.)

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC3380
BIOL
3380
04988
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
H. Callahan 0 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC3388y Tropical Ecology 3 pts. Prerequisites: BIOL BC1500, BC1501, BC1502, BC1503 or the equivalent. Focusing on tropical rain forests, the course explores the contemporary and historical ecological processes that generate and maintain species diversity in the tropics. Topics include biogeography and the latitudinal gradient of diversity, tropical climate and soils, origins of tropical ecosystems, causes and consequences of tropical deforestation, as well as unique ecological patterns and processes in specific tropical regions (Neotropics, African, and Asian tropics).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC3388
BIOL
3388
07748
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
K. McGuire 2 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC3590x or y Senior Seminar 4 pts. Prerequisites: BC1500, BC1501, BC1502, BC1503, and BC2100. Required of all majors who do not select Senior Thesis (BIOL BC3593 / BC3594) to fulfill the senior requirement, these seminars allow students to explore the primary literature in the Biological Sciences in greater depth than can be achieved in a lecture course. Attention will be focused on both theoretical and empirical work. Seminar periods are devoted to oral reports and discussion of assigned readings and student reports. Students will write one extensive literature review of a topic related to the central theme of the seminar section. Topics vary per semester and include:1. Plant Development 2. Animal Development and Evolution 3. Molecular Evolution 4. Microbiology and Global Change 5. Genomics 6. Stress in Primates.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC3590
BIOL
3590
09282
010
M 12:00p - 1:50p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC3591x-BC3592y Guided Research and Seminar 3 pts. Per Semester Prerequisites: Permission of a faculty sponsor and the department. Cannot be taken concurrently with BIOL BC3593 or BIOL BC3594. An independent research project in Biology under the guidance of a faculty member and suiting the needs of the individual student. Projects conducted outside of the Barnard Biology Department must have a member of the Department acting as a sponsor. Attendance at a weekly seminar is required. By the end of the year, students write a scientific paper and orally present their results to the Barnard Biology Department. Completion of both BIO BC3591 and BIOL BC3592 fulfills one upper-level laboratory requirement in the major. Must be taken in sequence, beginning in the fall.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC3591
BIOL
3591
01445
001
M 1:10p - 2:00p
TBA
K. McGuire 0 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC3593x-BC3594y Senior Thesis Research 3 pts. Per Semester Prerequisites: Permission of a faculty sponsor and the department. Cannot be taken concurrently with BIOL BC3591 or BIOL BC3592. Same as BIOL BC3591-BC3592, including the weekly seminar. Completion of both BIOL BC3593 and BC3594 fulfills the senior requirement in the major. Must be taken in sequence, beginning in the fall.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC3593
BIOL
3593
01777
001
M 1:10p - 2:00p
TBA
K. McGuire 0 [ More Info ]

BIOL BC3597xy Guided Research 1-4 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of a faculty sponsor. Similar to BIOL BC3591/ BC3592 but a variable point course without seminar or an oral presentation. Does not fulfill Biology major requirements.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL BC3597
BIOL
3597
02657
001
TBA J. Glendinning 0 [ More Info ]

BIOL C2005x Introductory Biology I: Biochemistry, Genetics & Molecular Biology 4 pts. Prerequisites: One year of college chemistry, or a strong high school chemistry background. Lecture and recitation. Recommended as the introductory biology course for biology and related majors, and for premedical students. Fundamental principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics. Website: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/courses/c2005/index.html

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL C2005
BIOL
2005
22358
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
D. Mowshowitz
L. Chasin
98 [ More Info ]
BIOL
2005
16844
002
TuTh 5:40p - 6:55p
TBA
D. Mowshowitz
L. Chasin
47 [ More Info ]

BIOL W2501x or y Contemporary Biology Laboratory 3 pts. Corequisites: Strongly recommended prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL C2005 or F2401. Experiments focus on genetics and molecular biology, with an emphasis on data analysis and experimental techniques. The class also includes a study of mammalian anatomy and histology. Each section is limited to 28 students. Lab Fee $150.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL W2501
BIOL
2501
26536
001
M 1:10p - 5:00p
TBA
C. Hazen 28 / 28 [ More Info ]
BIOL
2501
14250
002
Tu 1:10p - 5:00p
TBA
C. Hazen 18 / 28 [ More Info ]
BIOL
2501
66844
003
W 1:10p - 5:00p
TBA
C. Hazen 28 / 28 [ More Info ]
BIOL
2501
71930
004
Th 1:10p - 5:00p
TBA
C. Hazen 5 / 28 [ More Info ]
BIOL
2501
98046
005
Th 7:30p - 11:30p
TBA
C. Hazen 22 / 28 [ More Info ]
BIOL
2501
18981
006
F 1:10p - 5:00p
TBA
C. Hazen 28 / 28 [ More Info ]

BIOL C2908x First-Year Seminar in Modern Biology 1 pt. If you are interested in doing biology-related research at Columbia University this is the course for you. Each week a different Columbia University professor's discusses their biology-related research giving you an idea of what kind of research is happening at Columbia. Come ask questions and find out how the body works, the latest therapies for disease and maybe even find a lab to do research in. http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/courses/c2908/index.html

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL C2908
BIOL
2908
72371
001
W 2:40p - 3:40p
TBA
A. Heicklen 1 / 45 [ More Info ]

BIOL W3004 Neurobiology I: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology 4 pts. Prerequisites: one year of biology; a course in physics is highly recommended. Lecture and recitation. This is an advanced course intended for majors providing an in depth survey of the cellular and molecular aspects of nerve cell function. Topics include the cell biology and biochemistry of neurons, ionic and molecular basis of electrical signals, synaptic transmission and its modulation, function of sensory receptors. Although not required, it is intended to be followed by Neurobiology II (see below). The recitation meets once per week in smaller groups and emphasizes readings from the primary literature. Discussion Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL W3004
BIOL
3004
69155
001
TuTh 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
S. Firestein 80 [ More Info ]

BIOL W3022 Developmental Biology 3 pts. Prerequisites: BIOL C2005-C2006 or equivalent Come discover how the union of egg and sperm triggers the complex cellular interactions that specify the diverse variety of cells present in multicellular organisms. Cellular and molecular aspects of sex determination, gametogenesis, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, telomerase as the biological clock, stem cells, cloning, the pill and cell interactions will be explored, with an emphasis on humans. Original research articles will be discussed to further examine current research in developmental biology. BIOL W3022_001_2007_1">

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL W3022
BIOL
3022
71085
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
A. Heicklen 47 [ More Info ]

BIOL W3034 Biotechnology 3 pts. Prerequisites: genetics or molecular biology. For upper-level undergraduates. The course covers techniques currently used to explore and manipulate gene function and their applications in medicine and the environment. Part I covers key laboratory manipulations, including DNA cloning, gene characterization, association of genes with disease, and methods for studying gene regulation and activities of gene products. Part II also covers commercial applications, and includes animal cell culture, production of recombinant proteins, novel diagnostics, high throughput screening, and environmental biosensors.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL W3034
BIOL
3034
14582
001
MW 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
D. Kalderon
L. Chasin
6 [ More Info ]

BIOL W3041 Cell Biology 3 pts. Prerequisites: one year of biology, normally BIOL C2005-C2006, or the equivalent. Corequisites: Biochemistry. Introduction to cell biology stressing the architecture of the cell as it relates to cellular function, physiology, biochemistry, and disease, as well as some detailed discussions of the experiments that have informed our current views of the cell.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL W3041
BIOL
3041
28105
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
E. Miller 51 [ More Info ]

BIOL C3052 Project Laboratory in Molecular Genetics 5 pts. Prerequisites: one year of introductory biology and the instructor's permission. Enrollment limited to approximately 12. Fee: $150. Project laboratory on the manipulation of nucleic acids in prokaryotes, including DNA isolation, restriction mapping, and transformation. The first part of the laboratory involves learning of techniques to be used subsequently in independent research projects suggested by the professor.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL C3052
BIOL
3052
13705
001
TuTh 1:10p - 5:00p
743 SEELEY W. MUDD BUILDING
A. Tzagoloff 17 / 12 [ More Info ]

BIOL W3073 Cellular and Molecular Immunology 3 pts. Prerequisites: Two semesters of a rigorous, molecularly-oriented introductory biology course (such as C2005 and C2006), or the instructor's permission. This course will cover the basic concepts underlying the mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity, as well as key experimental methods currently used in the field. To keep it real, the course will include clinical correlates in such areas as infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer and transplantation. Taking this course won't turn you into an immunologist, but it may make you want to become one, as was the case for several students last year. After taking the course, you should be able to read the literature intelligently in this rapidly advancing field.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL W3073
BIOL
3073
27334
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
S. Mowshowitz 49 [ More Info ]

History & Philosophy of Science


HPSC W3201 Philosophy and History of Evolutionary Biology 3 pts. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. This course does not carry credit as a biology course. Explores the philosophical basis and historical development of evolutionary biology as a means of inquiry into causation, explanation, and testing in biology, and the implications for human understanding. Topics include Darwinian evolutionary theory, problems of creationism, theories of inheritance, Mendelism and natural selection, species concepts, adaptation and macroevolution, and the rise of the synthetic theory of evolution, both nomological and historical.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: HPSC W3201
HPSC
3201
16414
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
W. Bock 3 [ More Info ]

Biology


BIOL W3208 Introduction to Evolutionary Biology 3 pts. Recommended preparation: an introductory course in college biology. Introduction to principles of general evolutionary theory, both nomological and historical; causes and processes of evolution; phylogenetic evolution; species concept and speciation; adaptation and macroevolution; concepts of phylogeny and classification.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL W3208
BIOL
3208
69407
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
W. Bock 5 [ More Info ]

BIOL W3500 Independent Research 3-4 pts. Prerequisites: Concurrent with registering for this course, a student must register with the department, provide a written invitation from a mentor and submit a research proposal; details of this procedure are available on the Internet at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/courses/w3500/index.htm Corequisites: BIOL W3600 required in the spring for students who have not previously taken W3500. Up to 4 points of letter-grade credit may be used toward the major. Fee: $150. Independent study, faculty-supervised laboratory projects in contemporary biology. A paper summarizing results of the work is required by the last day of finals for a letter grade; no late papers will be accepted. NEW for SPRING 2014: There are two recitations times for the course, Wednesdays at 5 PM and Thursdays at 5 PM, each for 60-90 minutes. You must sign up for one of these times and be present at most sessions (details will be announced during the course). These sessions will be used primarily for student presentations. They will not meet every week but as announced during the course. (If you have a conflict with both of these times, you must write to Dr. Prywes with detailed reasoning to ask for an exemption. Exemptions will only be granted for required course conflicts.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL W3500
BIOL
3500
26187
001
TBA R. Prywes 36 [ More Info ]

Biology - Chemistry


BIOC C3501 Biochemistry: Structure and Metabolism 4 pts. Prerequisites: BIOL W2001 or C2005 and one year of organic chemistry. Lecture and recitation. Students wishing to cover the full range of modern biochemistry should take both BIOC C3501 and C3512. C3501 covers subject matters in modern biochemistry, including chemical biology and structural biology, discussing the structure and function of both proteins and small molecules in biological systems.Proteins are the primary class of biological macromolecules and serve to carry out most cellular functions. Small organic molecules function in energy production and creating building blocks for the components of cells and can also be used to perturb the functions of proteins directly. The first half of the course covers protein structure, enzyme kinetics and enzyme mechanism. The second half of the course explores how small molecules are used endogenously by living systems in metabolic and catabolic pathways; this part of the course focuses on mechanistic organic chemistry involved in metabolic pathways.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOC C3501
BIOC
3501
15963
001
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
B. Stockwell 136 [ More Info ]

Biology


BIOL W3700 Independent Clinical Research 2-4 pts. Prerequisites: Concurrent with registering for this course, a student must register with the department, provide a written invitation from a mentor and submit a research proposal. BIOL 3700 will provide an opportunity for students interested in independent research work in a hospital or hospice setting. In these settings, where patients and their needs Are paramount, and where IRB rules and basic medical ethics make "Wet-lab biology research" inappropriate, undergraduate may well find a way nevertheless, to assist and participate in ongoing clinical research. Such students, once they have identified a mentor willing to provide support, participation, and advising, may apply to the faculty member in charge of the course for 2-4 points/semester in BIOL W3700. This course will closely follow procedures already in place for BIOL 3500, but will ask potential mentors to provide evidence that students will gain hands-on experience in a clinical setting, while participating in a hospital- or hospice-based research agenda. A paper summarizing results of the work is required by the last day of finals for a letter grade; no late papers will be accepted.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL W3700
BIOL
3700
72683
001
TBA R. Pollack 1 [ More Info ]

BIOL W3995 (Section 1) Topics in Biology: Crossroads in Bioethics 2 pts. Prerequisites: At least one introductory course in biology or chemistry. This two credit multidisciplinary and interactive course will focus on contemporary issues in bioethics. Each topic will cover both the underlying science of new biotechnologies and the subsequent bioethical issues that emerge from these technologies. Classroom time will be devoted to student discussions, case presentations, and role playing. Topics include human trafficking, stem cell research, human reproductive cloning, neuroethics, genetic screening, human-animal chimeras, synthetic biology, bioterrorism, and neuroimaging.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL W3995
BIOL
3995
14189
001
W 12:00p - 1:00p
TBA
J. Meszaros 5 / 30 [ More Info ]

BIOL W3995 (Section 2) Topics In Biology- Neuroscience and The Law 1 pt. Prerequisites: At least one advanced course in neurophysiology. No background in law is needed. This course discusses the human behaviors that are subject to the law, and examines the neurobiological understanding of those behaviors. Closeness of fit between legal notions of human behavior will be compared with knowledge of neurobiology -- especially in the understanding of anxiety, drug addiction, and adolescence. Each week, a different type of behavior or class of individuals will be discussed. Readings will be split between primary literature in neuroscience and scholarly articles in law.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL W3995
BIOL
3995
61762
002
Tu 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
D. Newman 10 / 30 [ More Info ]

BIOL W4001x Advanced Genetic Analysis 3 pts. Prerequisites: For undergrads:Introductory Genetics (W3031)and permission of the instructor. This seminar course provides a detailed presentation of areas in classical and molecular genetics for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students. Topics include transmission genetics, gain and loss of function mutations, genetic redundancy, suppressors, enhancers, epistasis, expression patterns, using transposons, and genome analysis. The course is a mixture of lectures, student presentations, seminar discussions, and readings from the original literature. Undergraduates wishing to take the course need to have taken Genetics W3031 or its equivalent and received the instructor's permission. Enrollment is limited to 25 students.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL W4001
BIOL
4001
24251
001
Tu 1:10p - 3:55p
TBA
M. Chalfie 7 / 28 [ More Info ]

Biotechnology


BIOT W4200 Biopharmaceutical Development & Regulation 3 pts. The program aims to provide current life sciences students with an understanding of what drives the regulatory strategies that surround the development decision making process, and how the regulatory professional may best contribute to the goals of product development and approval. To effect this we will examine operational, strategic and commercial aspects of the regulatory approval process for new drug, biologic and biotechnology products both in the United States and worldwide. The topics are designed to provide a chronological review of the requirements needed to obtain marketing approval. Regulatory strategic, operational, and marketing considerations will be addressed throughout the course. We will examine and analyze the regulatory process as a product candidates are advanced from Research and Development, through pre-clinical and clinical testing, to marketing approval, product launch and the post-marketing phase. The goal of this course is to introduce and familiarize students with the terminology, timelines and actual steps followed by Regulatory Affairs professionals employed in the pharmaceutical or biotechnology industry. Worked examples will be explored to illustrate complex topics and illustrate interpretation of regulations.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOT W4200
BIOT
4200
23314
001
Th 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
R. Guido 12 [ More Info ]

Biology


BIOL G4260 Proteomics Laboratory 3 pts. Prerequisites: Instructor's permission Starting with fall 2009, this course will now be offered only in the fall semester.

Open to students in M.A. in Biotechnology Program (points can be counted against laboratory requirement for that program), Ph.D. and advanced undergraduate students with background in genetics or molecular biology. Students should be comfortable with basic biotechnology laboratory techniques as well as being interested in doing computational work in a Windows environment. This course deals with the proteome: the expressed protein complement of a cell, matrix, tissue, organ or organism. The study of the proteome (proteomics) is broadly applicable to life sciences research, and is increasing important in academic, government and industrial research through extension of the impact of advances in genomics. These techniques are being applied to basic research, exploratory studies of cancer and other diseases, drug discovery and many other topics. Techniques of protein extraction, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry will be covered. Emphasis will be on mastery of practical techniques of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and database searching for identification of proteins separated by gel electrophoresis as well as background tutorials and exercises covering other techniques used in descriptive and comparative proteomics. Lab Fee: $150.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL G4260
BIOL
4260
73549
001
Tu 9:00a - 12:15p
1000 FAIRCHILD LIFE SCIENCES BLDG
L. Brown 0 / 8 [ More Info ]

BIOL W4300 Drugs and Disease 3 pts. Prerequisites: Four semesters of biology with a firm foundation in molecular and cellular biology. Introduces students to the current understanding of human diseases, novel therapeutic approaches and drug development process. Selected topics will be covered in order to give students a feeling of the field of biotechnology in health science. This course also aims to strengthen students' skills in literature comprehension and critical thinking. Website: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/biology/courses/w4300/

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOL W4300
BIOL
4300
63145
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 8 [ More Info ]

BIOL G6002x (Section 2) Grad Core II: Protein Thermodynamics 2 pts. This course presents a rigorous introduction to solution thermodynamics and applies it to understanding the structural and functional features of proteins. After exploring the conceptual origins of thermodynamic theory, the standard equations describing solution equilibria are derived and applied to analyzing biochemical reactions, with a focus on those involved in protein folding and allosteric communication. The semester culminates with exploration of the energetic factors controlling the formation of protein secondary structures and the role of entropy-enthalpy compensation in determining the complex temperature-dependent thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions. The course emphasizes both qualitative understanding of the thermodynamic forces controlling the evolution and function of living organisms as well as practical application of thermodynamic methods and structural insight in laboratory research. Tutorials cover the use of curve-fitting techniques to analyze biochemical equilibria as well as the use of molecular visualization software to understand protein structure and function. Open to PhD candidates in the biomedical and chemical sciences and to other qualified graduate, undergraduate, and continuing education students with permission of the instructor. Course start date: Monday October 26, 2011. This is a half semester, 2 point course.


Business


BUSI W3013x and y Financial Accounting 3 pts. Enables students to become informed users of financial information by understanding the language of accounting and financial reporting. Focuses on the three major financial statements that companies prepare for use of management and external parties-the balance sheet, the income statement and the statement of cash flows. Examines the underlying concepts that go into the preparation of these financial statements as well as specific accounting rules that apply when preparing financial statements. Also looks at approaches to analyze the financial strength and operations of an entity. Uses actual financial statements to understand how financial information is presented and to apply analysis techniques.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BUSI W3013
BUSI
3013
87192
001
TuTh 5:40p - 6:55p
TBA
M. Deng 85 / 85 [ More Info ]

BUSI W3021x and y Marketing Management 3 pts. Designed to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental marketing concepts and their application by business and non-business organizations. The goal is to expose students to these concepts as they are used in a wide variety of settings, including consumer goods firms, manufacturing and service industries, and small and large businesses. The course gives an overview of marketing strategy issues, elements of a market (company, customers, and competition), as well as the fundamental elements of the marketing mix (product, price, placement/distribution, and promotion).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BUSI W3021
BUSI
3021
11297
001
W 4:10p - 7:00p
TBA
H. Estelami
K. Jedidi
60 / 60 [ More Info ]

BUSI W3703x Leadership in Organizations 3 pts. Initially the emphasis is on understanding the challenges confronting leaders and developing skills to effectively deal with these obstacles. Beyond intelligence and technical know-how, what separates effective leaders from other team members is a set of social skills (e.g. impression management, self-awareness). This course identifies these critical leadership skills and provides ideas and tools for improving them. Then the course considers how social intelligence skills fit the needs of managers at different stages of their careers. In early stages, managers need to achieve a good person-job fit, find mentors and build an effective social network. At the mid-career stage, managers need to lead an effective unit with increasing complexity and responsibilities. Finally, the course examines challenges managers face at later career stages as they become partners, CFOs, CEOs, etc.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BUSI W3703
BUSI
3703
16848
001
M 4:10p - 7:00p
TBA
A. Wallen 60 / 60 [ More Info ]

Biomedical Engineering


BMEN E1001x Engineering in medicine 3 pts. Lect: 3. The present and historical role of engineering in medicine and health care delivery. Engineering approaches to understanding organismic and cellular function in living systems. Engineering in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Medical imaging, medical devices: diagnostic and surgical instruments, drug delivery systems, prostheses, artificial organs. Medical informatics and organization of the health care system. Current trends in biomedical engineering research.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BMEN E1001
BMEN
1001
65542
001
M 4:10p - 6:40p
TBA
C. Hung
V. Mow
0 / 0 [ More Info ]

BMEN E4000x Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering: Reproductive Bioengineering 3 pts. Lect: 3.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BMEN E4000
BMEN
4000
17754
001
Tu 1:10p - 3:40p
TBA
B. Morrison 4 [ More Info ]

Biomedical Engineering - Electrical Engineering


BMEE E4030x Neural control engineering 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: ELEN E3801 Topics include: basic cell biophysics, active conductance and the Hodgkin-Huxley model, simple neuron models, ion channel models and synaptic models, statistical models of spike generation, Wilson-Cowan model of cortex, large-scale electrophysiological recording methods, sensorimotor integration and optimal state estimation, operant conditioning of neural activity, nonlinear modeling of neural systems, sensory systems: visual pathway and somatosensory pathway, neural encoding model: spike triggered average (STA) and spike triggered covariance (STC) analysis, neuronal response to electrical micro-stimulation, DBS for Parkinson's disease treatment, motor neural prostheses, and sensory neural prostheses.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BMEE E4030
BMEE
4030
73236
001
Th 1:10p - 3:40p
TBA
Q. Wang 2 [ More Info ]

Biomedical Engineering


BMEN E4150x The cell as a machine 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: MATH V1101 or equivalent Corequisites: One semester of BIOL C2005 or BIOC C3501, and one semester of PHYS C1401 or equivalent Cells as complex micron-sized machines, basic physical aspects of cell components (diffusion, mechanics, electrostatics, hydrophobicity), energy transduction (motors, transporters, chaperones, synthesis complexes), basic cell functions. Biophysical principles, feedback controls for robust cell function, adaptation to environmental perturbations.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BMEN E4150
BMEN
4150
72362
001
Tu 5:40p - 8:25p
TBA
L. Kam
M. Sheetz
4 [ More Info ]

BMEN E4590x BioMems: cellular and molecular applications 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: Chemistry CHEM C3443 or CHEN C3545 or equivalent and MATH V1201 Corequisites: BIOL W2005 or equivalent Topics include biomicroelectromechanical, microfluidic, and lab-on-a-chip systems in biomedical engineering, with a focus on cellular and molecular applications. Microfabrication techniques, biocompatibility, miniaturization of analytical and diagnostic devices, high-throughput cellular studies, microfabrication for tissue engineering, and in vivo devices.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BMEN E4590
BMEN
4590
70656
001
Tu 4:10p - 6:40p
TBA
S. Sia 9 [ More Info ]

Mechanical & Biomedical Engineering


MEBM E4703x Molecular mechanics in biology 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: ENME E3105, APMA E2101, or instructor's permission. Mechanical understanding of biological structures including proteins, DNA and RNA in cells and tissues. Force response of proteins and DNA, mechanics of membranes, biophysics of molecular motors, mechanics of protein-protein interactions. Introduction to modeling and simulation techniques, and modern biophysical techniques such as single molecule FRET, optical traps, AFM, and superresolution imaging,for understanding molecular mechanics and dynamics.


Electrical Engineering - Biomedical Engineering


EEBM E6090x or y-E6099y (Section 1) Topics in computational neuroscience and neuroengineering: Brian/Computer Interfaces 3 pts. Lect: 2. Prerequisites: The instructor's permission. Selected advanced topics in computational neuroscience and neuroengineering. Content varies from year to year, and different topics rotate through the course numbers 6090-6099.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EEBM E6090
EEBM
6090
83096
001
Tu 1:10p - 3:40p
TBA
P. Sajda 1 [ More Info ]

EEBM E9070x or y Massively Neural Computation 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: Open to doctoral candidates, and qualified M.S. candidates with the instructor's permission. Drosophila connectomics. Detailed description of the fruit fly's olfactory and vision systems. Parallel Processing on GPUs.


Chemical Engineering


CHEN E4620y Introduction to polymers and soft materials 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: An elementary course in physical chemistry or thermodynamics. Organic chemistry, statistics, calculus and mechanics are helpful, but not essential. An introduction to the chemistry and physics of soft material systems (polymers, colloids, organized surfactant systems and others), emphasizing the connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic physical properties. To develop an understanding of each system, illustrative experimental studies are discussed along with basic theoretical treatments. High molecular weight organic polymers are discussed first (basic notions, synthesis, properties of single polymer molecules, polymer solution and blend thermodynamics, rubber and gels). Colloidal systems are treated next (dominant forces in colloidal systems, flocculation, preparation and manipulation of colloidal systems) followed by a discussion of self-organizing surfactant systems (architecture of surfactants, miceles and surfactant membranes, phase behavior).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEN E4620
CHEN
4620
60787
001
TuTh 11:35a - 12:55p
TBA
C. Durning 1 [ More Info ]

Graphics


GRAP E1115x and y Engineering graphics 3 pts. Lect: 1. Lab: 3. Open to all students. Visualization and simulation in virtual environments; computer graphics methods for presentation of data. 3-D modeling; animation; rendering; image editing; technical drawing. Lab fee: $300.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GRAP E1115
GRAP
1115
27253
001
M 4:10p - 6:40p
TBA
J. Sanchez 50 / 50 [ More Info ]

Engineering Mechanics


ENME E3161x Fluid mechanics 4 pts. Lect: 3. Lab: 3. Prerequisites: ENME E3105 and ordinary differential equations. Fluid statics. Fundamental principles and concepts of flow analysis. Differential and finite control volume approach to flow analysis. Dimensional analysis. Application of flow analysis: flow in pipes, external flow, flow in open channels.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ENME E3161
ENME
3161
14366
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
H. Waisman 18 [ More Info ]
ENME
3161
20599
B01
Th 1:00p - 4:00p
TBA
H. Waisman 0 / 0 [ More Info ]

ENME E3332x A First Course in Finite Elements 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: Senior standing or by instructor permission
(Students taking ENME E3332 cannot take ENME E4332) Corequisites: (Recommended): differential equations Focus on formulation and application of the finite element to engineering problems such as stress analysis, heat transfer, fluid flow and electromagnetics. Topics include: finite element formulation for one-dimensional problems, such as trusses, electrical and hydraulic systems, scalar field problems in two dimensions, such as heat transfer, and vector field problems such as elasticity and finally usage of the commercial finite element program. Detailed course description: Focus on formulation and application of the finite element method to engineering problems such as stress analysis, heat transfer, fluid flow and electromagnetics. The course material is organized in three chronological units one month each: (1) the finite element formulation for one-dimensional problems, such as trusses, electrical and hydraulic systems, (2) the finite element formulation for scalar field problems in two dimensions, such as heat transfer and (3) the finite element formulation for vector field problems such as elasticity, and (4) finite element programming and usage of commercial finite element program.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ENME E3332
ENME
3332
16680
001
Th 1:10p - 3:40p
TBA
J. Fish 24 [ More Info ]

ENME E4113x Advanced mechanics of solids 3 pts. Lect: 3. Stress and deformation formulation in two-and three-dimensional solids; viscoelastic and plastic material in one and two dimensions energy methods.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ENME E4113
ENME
4113
11115
001
Tu 7:00p - 9:30p
TBA
H. Yin 4 [ More Info ]

Civil Engineering


CIEN E4163x Environmental engineering: wastewater 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: Introductory chemistry (with laboratory) and fluid mechanics. Fundamentals of water pollution and wastewater characteristics. Chemistry, microbiology, and reaction kinetics. Design of primary, secondary, and advanced treatment systems. Small community and residential systems.


Civil Engineering and Earth and Environmental Engineering


CIEE E4252x Environmental engineering 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: CHEM C1403 or the equivalent; ENME E3161 or the equivalent. Engineering aspects of problems involving human interaction with the natural environment. Review of fundamentals principles that underlie the discipline of environmental engineering, i.e., constituent transport and transformation processes in environmental media such as water, air and ecosystems. Engineering applications for addressing environmental problems such as water quality and treatment, air pollutant emissions, and hazardous waster remediation. Presented in the context of current issues facing practicing engineers and government agencies, including legal and regulatory framework, environmental impact assessments, and natural resource management.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CIEE E4252
CIEE
4252
15639
001
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
K. Chandran 11 [ More Info ]

Chemistry


CHEM W0001x Preparation for College Chemistry Prerequisites: High school algebra or the instructor's permission. Recommended Preparation: high school physics and chemistry. Not for credit toward the bachelor's degree. Given on a Pass/Fail basis only. This course is preparation for Chemistry W1403 or the equivalent, as well as for other science courses. It is intended for students who have not attended school for sometime or who do not have a firm grasp of high school chemistry. Topics include atomic and nuclear structure, nomenclature, chemical bonding and its relation to molecular structure, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, periodic properties of elements, equilibria, gas laws, acids and bases, and kinetics. Recitation Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM W0001
CHEM
0001
13299
001
TuTh 6:10p - 7:25p
TBA
L. Avila 2 / 50 [ More Info ]

CHEM C1403x-C1404y General Chemistry (Lecture) 3.5 pts. Prerequisites: concurrent registration in MATH V1101; for C1404: CHEM C1403 or W1403. Preparation equivalent to one year of high school chemistry is assumed and concurrent registration in Calculus I. Students lacking such preparation should plan independent study of chemistry over the summer or take CHEM W0001 before taking C1403. Topics include stoichiometry, states of matter, chemical equilibria, acids and bases, chemical thermodynamics, nuclear properties, electronic structures of atoms, periodic properties, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, introduction to organic and biological chemistry, solid state and materials science, polymer science and macromolecular structures, chemical kinetics, coordination chemistry, and electrochemistry. Although C1403 and C1404 are separate courses, students are expected to take both terms sequentially. the order of presentation of topics may differ from the order presented here, and from year to year. Recitation Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM C1403
CHEM
1403
22685
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
G. Parkin 16 / 210 [ More Info ]
CHEM
1403
69789
002
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
A. Cacciuto 6 / 190 [ More Info ]
CHEM
1403
62634
003
TuTh 6:10p - 7:25p
TBA
M. Pagnotta 4 / 190 [ More Info ]

CHEM W1403x or y-W1404y General Chemistry ( Lecture) 3.5 pts. Prerequisites: concurrent registration in MATH V1101; for C1404: CHEM C1403 or W1403. Topics include kinetic theory of gases, solutions, equilibria, oxidation-reduction, reactions, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, the electronic structure of atoms, chemical bonding and its relationship to the geometries of molecules, periodic properties of the elements, transition metal complexes, and an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. Recitation Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM W1403
CHEM
1403
20936
001
MW 6:10p - 7:25p
TBA
R. Beer 5 / 132 [ More Info ]

CHEM W1403y General Chemistry I 3.5 pts. Corequisites: MATH V1101 Topics include stoichiometry, states of matter, chemical equilibria, acids and bases, chemical thermodynamics, nuclear properties, electronic structures of atoms, periodic properties, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, introduction to organic and biological chemistry, solid state and materials science, polymer science and macromolecular structures, chemical kinetics, coordination chemistry, and electrochemistry. Recitation Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM W1403
CHEM
1403
20936
001
MW 6:10p - 7:25p
TBA
R. Beer 5 / 132 [ More Info ]

CHEM W1500x or y General Chemistry Laboratory. 3 pts. Corequisites: CHEM C1403 or W1403. Laboratory Fee: $140. An introduction to basic techniques of modern experimental chemistry, including quantitative procedures and chemical analysis. A Lab Lecture section is also required for this course (W1501).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM W1500
CHEM
1500
10801
001
Tu 1:10p - 4:55p
TBA
J. Ulichny
S. Hansen
8 / 46 [ More Info ]
CHEM
1500
10974
002
Tu 6:10p - 9:55p
TBA
J. Ulichny
S. Hansen
8 / 46 [ More Info ]
CHEM
1500
18625
003
W 1:10p - 4:55p
TBA
J. Ulichny
S. Hansen
4 / 46 [ More Info ]
CHEM
1500
19903
004
Th 1:10p - 4:55p
TBA
J. Ulichny
S. Hansen
3 / 46 [ More Info ]

CHEM C1604x Second Semester General Chemistry (Intensive) 3.5 pts. Prerequisites: A grade of "B" or better in CHEM C1403 or W1403 or acceptable performance on the Department placement exam. Corequisites: Calculus II. Topics include: Gases (Kinetic Theory of Gases); Binary Collision Model for Chemical Reactions; Chemical Kinetics; Acid-base Equilibria; Thermochemistry (Thermodynamics I); Thermodynamics II Spontaneous Processes; Chemical Bonding in Polyatomic Molecules. Recitation Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM C1604
CHEM
1604
71819
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
L. Brus 1 / 110 [ More Info ]

CHEM W2507x or y Intensive General Chemistry Laboratory 3 pts. Prerequisites: CHEM C1604 or C3045. Laboratory Fee: $140. An introduction to basic techniques and practices of modern experimental chemistry, including qualitative procedures and chemical analysis. This course differs from CHEM W1500 in its emphasis on instrumentation and methods. Students must also attend the compulsory Mentoring Session. Please check the Directory of Classes for details.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM W2507
CHEM
2507
23451
001
F 1:00p - 6:00p
TBA
L. Avila 1 / 18 [ More Info ]
CHEM
2507
26376
002
M 1:00p - 6:00p
TBA
L. Avila 1 / 18 [ More Info ]

CHEM C3045x-C3046y Intensive Organic Chemistry for First-Year Students (Lecture) 3.5 pts. Prerequisites: A grade of 5 on the Chemistry Advanced Placement exam and an acceptable grade on the Department placement exam. Not open to students who have taken other courses in college-level chemistry. Premedical students may take CHEM C3045, C3046, and W3545 to meet the minimum requirements for admission to medical school. This course covers the same material as CHEM C3443-C3444, but is intended for students who have learned the principles of general chemistry in high school. The level of instruction is appropriate for those who have not had a college course in general chemistry. Students enrolled in CHEM C3045-C3046 are expected to enroll concurrently in CHEM W2507. Recitation Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM C3045
CHEM
3045
15071
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
R. Breslow 0 / 35 [ More Info ]

CHEM C3079x-C3080y Physical Chemistry, I and II 4 pts. Prerequisites: CHEM C1403 and C1404, or C1604, or C3045 and C3046; PHYS V1201-V1202 is acceptable, PHYS C1401-C1402 is recommended, or the equivalent; and MATH V1101-V1102 or V1207-V1208. Recommended corequisite: CHEM C3085-C3086. Elementary but comprehensive treatment of the fundamental laws governing the behavior of individual atoms and molecules and collections of them. C3079: The thermodynamics of chemical systems at equilibrium and the chemical kinetics of nonequilibrium systems. C3080: The quantum mechanics of atoms and molecules, the quantum statistical mechanics of chemical systems, and the connection of statistical mechanics to thermodynamics. Recitation Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM C3079
CHEM
3079
10366
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
B. Berne 31 / 60 [ More Info ]

CHEM C3085x-C3086y Physical and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory 4 pts. Prerequisites: CHEM C3085 is prerequisite for C3086. Corequisites: CHEM C3079 for CHEM C3085 and C3080 for C3080. Laboratory Fee: $125 per term. Techniques of experimental physical chemistry and instrumental analysis, including infrared and ultraviolet spectrophotometry, magnetic resonance, electroanalytical methods, calorimetry, reaction kinetics, hydrodynamic methods, and applications of digital computers to the analysis of experimental data.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM C3085
CHEM
3085
69558
001
Tu 12:00p - 6:00p
TBA
L. Avila 15 / 15 [ More Info ]

CHEM C3098x or y Supervised Independent Research 4 pts. Prerequisites: The permission of the professor in charge for entrance, and the permission of the departmental representative for aggregate points in excess of 12 or less than 4. Laboratory Fee: $105 per term. This course may be repeated for credit (see major and concentration requirements). Individual research under the supervision of a member of the staff. Research areas include organic, physical, inorganic, analytical, and biological chemistry.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM C3098
CHEM
3098
21309
001
TBA V. Gasperov 8 / 25 [ More Info ]

CHEM BC3357x Biochemistry Laboratory Techniques 3 pts. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: four terms of chemistry and biology laboratory. Corequisite: BIOC C3501 or BCHM G4021. Fee: $45. Same course as BC3355, but only one section of lab hours required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC3357
CHEM
3357
02033
001
Tu 12:10p - 1:00p
TBA
TuTh 1:10p - 5:00p
TBA
M. Sever
S. Liu
0 [ More Info ]

CHEM C3443x-C3444y Organic Chemistry (Lecture) 3.5 pts. Prerequisites: CHEM C1404 or W1404 or C1604, and W1500. The principles of organic chemistry. The structure and reactivity of organic molecules are examined from the standpoint of modern theories of chemistry. Topics include stereochemistry, reactions of organic molecules, mechanisms of organic reactions, syntheses and degradations of organic molecules, and spectroscopic techniques of structure determination. Recitation Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM C3443
CHEM
3443
70446
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
V. Cornish 53 / 198 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3443
21704
002
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
L. Campos 198 / 198 [ More Info ]

CHEM W3443x-W3444y Organic Chemistry (Lecture) 3.5 pts. Prerequisites: CHEM C1404 or W1404 or C1604, and W1500. The principles of organic chemistry. The structure and reactivity of organic molecules are examined from the standpoint of modern theories of chemistry. Topics include stereochemistry, reactions of organic molecules, mechanisms of organic reactions, syntheses and degradations of organic molecules, and spectroscopic techniques of structure determination. Recitation Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM W3443
CHEM
3443
21815
001
MW 6:10p - 7:25p
TBA
C. Doubleday 69 / 132 [ More Info ]

Biology - Chemistry


BIOC C3501x Biochemistry, I: Structure and Metabolism 4 pts. Prerequisites: ENVB W2001 or BIOL C2005 and one year of organic chemistry. Lecture and recitation. Students wishing to cover the full range of modern biochemistry should take both BIOC C3501 and C3512. Protein structure, protein folding, enzyme kinetics, allostery, membrane transport, biological membranes, and protein targeting. Chemistry and metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, purines, and pyrimidines. Recitation Section Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BIOC C3501
BIOC
3501
15963
001
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
B. Stockwell 136 [ More Info ]

Chemistry


CHEM W3543x or y Organic Chemistry Laboratory 3 pts. Prerequisites: CHEM W1500 Corequisites: CHEM C3443 or W3443. Laboratory Fee: $125. Students planning to take a full year of laboratory should enroll in CHEM W3543 and W3546. Techniques of experimental organic chemistry, with emphasis on understanding fundamental principles underlying the experiments in methodology of solving laboratory problems involving organic molecules.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM W3543
CHEM
3543
16700
001
M 1:00p - 6:00p
TBA
D. Sedbrook 24 / 24 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3543
18492
002
Tu 1:00p - 6:00p
TBA
D. Sedbrook 24 / 24 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3543
25336
003
W 1:00p - 6:00p
TBA
A. Ghurbanyan 34 / 34 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3543
11674
004
Th 1:00p - 6:00p
TBA
A. Ghurbanyan 15 / 34 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3543
10313
005
F 1:00p - 6:00p
TBA
A. Ghurbanyan 34 / 34 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3543
29287
006
TBA D. Sedbrook 7 / 34 [ More Info ]

CHEM W3545x Intensive Organic Chemistry Laboratory 3 pts. Prerequisites: CHEM C3045 and C3046 and W2507. Laboratory Fee: $125. The course covers the same material as CHEM W3543, but is intended for those students who have taken Intensive Organic Chemistry for First-Year Students, CHEM C3045-C3046 and for students who are intending to major in Chemistry, Biochemistry, Chemical Physics or Environmental Chemistry.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM W3545
CHEM
3545
20146
001
M 1:00p - 6:00p
TBA
F. Ng 5 / 10 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3545
22147
002
Tu 1:00p - 6:00p
TBA
F. Ng 0 / 10 [ More Info ]

CHEM C3920x Senior Seminar in Chemical Research 2 pts. Open to senior chemistry, biochemistry, environmental chemistry, and chemical physics majors, senior chemistry concentrators, and students who have taken or are currently enrolled in CHEM C3098. Pass/Fail credit only. Senior seminar provides direct access to modern chemical research through selected studies by the students from active fields of chemical research. Topics to be presented and discussed draw from the current scientific literature and/or C3098 research.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM C3920
CHEM
3920
27605
001
F 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
L. Kaufman 11 / 40 [ More Info ]

CHEM G4071x Inorganic Chemistry 4.5 pts. Prerequisites: C3443-C3444 or C3045-C3046 Corequisites: N/A Principles governing the structure and reactivity of inorganic compounds surveyed from experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Topics include inorganic solids, aqueous and nonaqueous solutions, the chemistry of selected main group elements, transition metal chemistry, metal clusters, metal carbonyls, and organometallic chemistry.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM G4071
CHEM
4071
70788
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
J. Owen 14 [ More Info ]

CHEM G4147x Advanced Organic Chemistry 4.5 pts. Prerequisites: Elementary organic and physical chemistry. The mechanisms of organic reactions, structure of organic molecules, and theories of reactivity. How reactive intermediates are recognized and mechanisms are deduced using kinetics, stereochemistry, isotopes, and physical measurements.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM G4147
CHEM
4147
67726
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
D. Sames
T. Lambert
2 [ More Info ]

CHEM G4148x Synthetic Methods in Organic Chemistry I 4.5 pts. Construction, analysis and strategies for the synthesis of complex natutal products.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM G4148
CHEM
4148
19775
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
S. Danishefsky
T. Lambert
3 [ More Info ]

CHEM G4221x Quantum Chemistry 4.5 pts. Prerequisites: Elementary physical chemistry. Basic quantum mechanics: the Schrodinger equation and its interpretation, exact solutions in simple cases, methods or approximation, angular Mementum and electronic spin, and an introduction to atomic and molecular structure.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM G4221
CHEM
4221
67336
001
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
R. Friesner 1 [ More Info ]

CHEM G4230x Statistical Thermodynamics. 4.5 pts. Prerequisites: Elementary physical chemistry. Corequisites: CHEM G4221 Topics include the classical and quantum statistical mechanics of gases, liquids, and solids.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM G4230
CHEM
4230
76750
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
D. Reichman 1 [ More Info ]

Biology - Chemistry


BIOC W4312x Chemical Biology 4 pts. Prerequisites: Elementary organic chemistry CHEM C3443, CHEM C3444. Recommended preparation elementary physical chemistry and biochemistry CHEM C3079 CHEM C3080. Development and application of chemical methods for understanding the molecular mechanisms of cellular processes. Review of the biosynthesis, chemical synthesis, and structure and function of proteins and nucleic acids. Application of chemical methods--including structural biology, enzymology, chemical genetics, and the synthesis of modified biological molecules--to the study of cellular processes--including transcription, translation, and signal transduction.


Chemistry


CHEM BC1010x Pumpkin Pie to CSI: Chemistry in Everyday Life 1 pt. Corequisites: None, but CHEM BC2001 is encouraged Survey and discussion of applications of chemistry in everyday life. Topics include art restoration, forensics, food chemistry, evolution of poisons, and personal-care chemistry. First-year students only. Enrollment limited to 14 students. There are two sections of this course. The Tuesday section is only for first-year students, and the Thursday section is for upperclass students.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC1010
CHEM
1010
04026
001
Th 11:00a - 12:00p
TBA
M. Rao 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
1010
08436
002
Tu 11:00a - 12:00p
TBA
M. Rao 0 [ More Info ]

CHEM BC2001x General Chemistry I 5 pts. Prerequisites: Algebra (Math SAT I score of 600 or permission of the instructor for first-year students). Corequisites: Lecture and laboratory must be taken together unless permission of the instructor is given. Lecture: MWF 11:00-11:50; Lab lecture and laboratory one afternoon: MTWRF: 1:10-5:00; sign up is located on the 8th floor of Altschul for lab sections. Counts towards Lab Science requirement. Atoms; elements and compounds; gases; solutions; equilibrium; acid-base, precipitation, and oxidation-reduction reactions; thermochemistry. Laboratory experience with both qualitative and quantitative techniques.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC2001
CHEM
2001
06144
001
MWF 11:00a - 11:50a
TBA
J. Alexander
J. Magyar
0 [ More Info ]

CHEM BC3231x Organic Chemistry II 3 pts. Prerequisites: CHEM BC3230. Lecture: MWF 10:00-10:50. Extension of concepts from Organic Chemistry I to conjugated systems; chemistry of the carbonyl group; NMR and IR spectroscopy; bioorganic chemistry.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC3231
CHEM
3231
07716
001
MWF 10:00a - 10:50a
TBA
C. Rojas 14 [ More Info ]

CHEM BC3253x Quantum Chemistry 3 pts. Prerequisites: Physics and Calculus II or III or permission of instructor. Lecture: MWF 11:00-11:50. Exact and approximate solutions to the Schrodinger equation. The structure of atoms and molecules. Chemical bonding and spectroscopy. Computer-based molecular modeling.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC3253
CHEM
3253
01266
001
MWF 11:00a - 11:50a
TBA
A. Crowther 0 [ More Info ]

CHEM BC3254x Methods and Applications in Physical Chemistry 3 pts. Prerequisites: One semester of physical chemistry (CHEM BC3252, CHEM BC3253, or the equivalent). Lecture: MWF 10:00-10:50. Advanced topics in physical chemistry, including statistical mechanics, reaction dynamics, surface science, spectroscopy, microscopy, and nanotechnology. Particular emphasis will be placed on current applications in related fields such as biomedicine, engineering, and environmental science.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC3254
CHEM
3254
06259
001
MWF 10:00a - 10:50a
TBA
M. Buzzeo 0 [ More Info ]

CHEM BC3333x Modern Techniques of Organic Chemistry Laboratory 3 pts. Prerequisites: CHEM BC3328 with a grade of C- or better and CHEM BC3230. Corequisites: CHEM BC3231. Lecture: Tu 12:00-12:50; Laboratory one afternoon: M, Tu, or Th 1:10-5:30. Advanced experimental organic techniques and introduction to qualitative and quantitative organic analysis. Emphasis on instrumental and chromatographic methods. Selected reactions.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC3333
CHEM
3333
03013
001
M 1:10p - 5:30p
TBA
Tu 12:00p - 12:50p
TBA
J. Vadakkan 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3333
00945
002
Tu 12:00p - 12:50p
TBA
Tu 1:10p - 5:30p
TBA
M. Rao 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3333
03742
003
Tu 12:00p - 12:50p
TBA
Th 1:10p - 5:30p
TBA
M. Rao 0 [ More Info ]

CHEM BC3337x Modern Techniques of Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2 pts. CHEM BC3333x + CHEM BC3337x = BC3335x Prerequisites: CHEM BC3333. Lecture: Tu 12:00-12:50; Laboratory one afternoon: Tu 1:10-5:30.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC3337
CHEM
3337
02076
001
Tu 12:00p - 12:50p
TBA
Tu 1:10p - 5:30p
TBA
M. Rao 0 [ More Info ]

CHEM BC3355x Biochemistry Laboratory Techniques 5 pts. Prerequisites: Organic II lab (CHEM BC3333, BC3335, or equivalent); Quantitative analysis lab (BC3338, BC3340, or equivalent); Biochemistry (CHEM BC3282, CHEM C3501, or equivalent). Lecture: Tu 12:00-12:50; Laboratory two afternoons: Tu Th 1:10-5:00. Theory and application of fundamental techniques for the isolation, synthesis and characterization of biological macromolecules including proteins, lipids, nucleotides and carbohydrates. Techniques include spectroscopic analysis, gel electrophoresis, chromatography, enzyme kinetics, immunoblotting, PCR, molecular cloning and cell culture, as well as modern laboratory instrumentation, such as UV-Vis, GC-MS and HPLC.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC3355
CHEM
3355
08439
001
Tu 12:10p - 1:00p
TBA
TuTh 1:10p - 5:00p
TBA
M. Sever
S. Liu
0 [ More Info ]

CHEM BC3357x Biochemistry Laboratory Techniques 3 pts. Prerequisites: Same as CHEM BC3355. Corequisites: Lecture: Tu 12:00-12:50; Laboratory: Tu or Th 1:10-5:00 Similar to CHEM BC3355, with experiments modified to be accomplished in one laboratory period per week.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC3357
CHEM
3357
02033
001
Tu 12:10p - 1:00p
TBA
TuTh 1:10p - 5:00p
TBA
M. Sever
S. Liu
0 [ More Info ]

CHEM BC3365x Integrated Chemistry Laboratory 3 pts. Prerequisites: CHEM BC3252 and CHEM BC3338 or equivalent. Corequisites: Lecture: W 1:10-2:00; Laboratory: M 1:10-5:30 and W 2:10-6:30. Experiments in kinetics, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry using instrumental methods; preparation and characterization of inorganic compounds; solids; some computer applications.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC3365
CHEM
3365
02826
001
M 1:10p - 5:30p
TBA
W 1:10p - 2:00p
TBA
W 2:10p - 6:30p
TBA
A. Crowther
S. Liu
0 [ More Info ]

CHEM BC3597x and y Problems in Chemistry 2 pts. Prerequisites: CHEM BC3333 or CHEM BC3338 and permission of instructor. 4 hours of laboratory work by arrangement. Individual research projects at Barnard or Columbia, culminating in a comprehensive written report.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC3597
CHEM
3597
03664
001
TBA C. Rojas 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3597
01537
002
TBA M. Buzzeo 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3597
05823
003
TBA D. Merrer 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3597
07294
004
TBA A. Crowther 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3597
01343
005
TBA J. Magyar 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3597
02865
006
TBA M. Sever 0 [ More Info ]

CHEM BC3598x and y External Problems in Chemistry 4 pts. Prerequisites: CHEM BC3333 and CHEM BC3338. Mandatory pass/fail grading. Permission of instructor (a Barnard professor who will act as liaison) is required. 8 hours of laboratory work by arrangement. Individual research projects at institutions other than Barnard and Columbia, culminating in a comprehensive written report and oral presentation.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC3598
CHEM
3598
09971
001
TBA D. Merrer 0 [ More Info ]

CHEM BC3599x and y Problems in Chemistry 4 pts. Prerequisites: CHEM BC3333 and CHEM BC3338. Permission of instructor. 8 hours of laboratory work by arrangement. Individual research projects at Barnard or Columbia, culminating in a comprehensive written report.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC3599
CHEM
3599
02182
001
TBA C. Rojas 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3599
05095
002
TBA M. Buzzeo 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3599
01197
003
TBA D. Merrer 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3599
00639
004
TBA A. Crowther 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3599
03432
005
TBA J. Magyar 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3599
03858
006
TBA M. Sever 0 [ More Info ]

CHEM BC3901x-BC3902y Senior Honors Thesis 4 pts. Enrollment restricted by invitation of the department. Guided research in Chemistry or Biochemistry, under the sponsorship of a faculty member, leading to the senior thesis. Weekly seminar F 2:10-4:00 and 8 hours research to be arranged.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CHEM BC3901
CHEM
3901
00140
001
F 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
M. Buzzeo 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3901
07231
002
TBA C. Rojas 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3901
05640
003
TBA D. Merrer 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3901
07402
004
TBA A. Crowther 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3901
09791
005
TBA J. Magyar 0 [ More Info ]
CHEM
3901
02487
006
TBA M. Sever 0 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK V1101x Elementary Greek I 4 pts. For students who have never studied Greek. An intensive study of grammar with reading and writing of simple Attic prose.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1101
GREK
1101
65467
001
MWF 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
E. Rudoni 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
1101
24276
002
MW 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
S. Oppen 6 [ More Info ]

Modern Greek


GRKM V1101x Elementary Modern Greek I 4 pts. This is the first semester of a year-long course designed for students wishing to learn Greek as it is written and spoken in Greece today. As well as learning the skills necessary to read texts of moderate difficulty and converse on a wide range of topics, students explore Modern Greece's cultural landscape from "parea" to poetry to politics. Special attention will be paid to Greek New York. How do "our," "American," "Greek-American" definitions of language and culture differ from "their", "Greek" ones?

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GRKM V1101
GRKM
1101
24240
001
TuTh 9:00a - 10:50a
TBA
F 10:00a - 10:50a
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 1 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V1101x and y Elementary Latin I 4 pts. For students who have never studied Latin. An intensive study of grammar with reading of simple prose and poetry.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1101
LATN
1101
63988
001
TuThF 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 2 [ More Info ]
LATN
1101
16318
002
MW 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
A. Conser 2 [ More Info ]
LATN
1101
27544
003
MW 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 5 / 20 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK V1102y Elementary Greek II 4 pts. Prerequisites: GREK V1101 or the equivalent, or the permission of the instructor or the director of undergraduate studies. Continuation of grammar study begun in GREK V1101; selections from Attic prose.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1102
GREK
1102
17200
001
TuTh 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
S. McVane 0 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V1102x and y Elementary Latin II 4 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V1101 A continuation of LATN V1101, including a review of grammar and syntax for students whose study of Latin has been interrupted.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1102
LATN
1102
65450
001
TBA C. Catenaccio 4 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK V1121x and y Intensive Elementary Greek 4 pts. Covers all of Greek grammar and syntax in one term. Prepares the student to enter second-year Greek (GREK V1201 or V1202).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1121
GREK
1121
74226
001
MWF 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V1121x and y Intensive Elementary Latin 4 pts. Designed to cover all of Latin grammar and syntax in one semester in order to prepare the student to enter LATN V1201 or V1202.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1121
LATN
1121
70513
001
MWF 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 2 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK V1201x Intermediate Greek I 4 pts. Prerequisites: GREK V1101-1102 or the equivalent. Selections form Attic prose.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1201
GREK
1201
08819
001
MW 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
N. Worman 8 / 25 [ More Info ]

Modern Greek


GRKM V1201x Intermediate Modern Greek I 4 pts. Prerequisites: GRKM V1101-V1102 or the equivalent. Corequisites: Students are also required to take the conversation class, GRKM W1211. This course is designed for students who are already familiar with the basic grammar and syntax of modern Greek language and can communicate at an elementary level. Using films, newspapers, and popular songs, students engage the finer points of Greek grammar and syntax and enrich their vocabulary. Emphasis is given to writing, whether in the form of film and book reviews or essays on particular topics taken from a selection of second year textbooks.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GRKM V1201
GRKM
1201
25430
001
TuTh 12:10p - 2:00p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V1201x and y Intermediate Latin I 4 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V1101-V1102, or LATN V1121, or the equivalent. Selections from Catullus and from Cicero or Caesar.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1201
LATN
1201
11376
001
MWF 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
E. Jewell 2 [ More Info ]
LATN
1201
62697
002
MW 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
U. Poole 6 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK V1202y Selections from Homer 4 pts. Prerequisites: GREK V1101-V1102 or GREK V1121 or the equivalent. Detailed grammatical and literary study of several books of the Iliad and introduction to the techniques or oral poetry, to the Homeric hexameter, and to the historical background of Homer.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1202
GREK
1202
12196
001
TuThF 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
D. Steiner 2 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V1202x and y Intermediate Latin II 4 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V1201 or the equivalent. Selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses and from Sallust, Livy, Seneca, or Pliny.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1202
LATN
1202
17833
001
TuTh 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
Z. Herz 5 [ More Info ]

Modern Greek


GRKM W1211x Intermediate Modern Greek Conversation 1 pt. For students in GRKM V1201, but also open to students not enrolled in GRKM V1201, who wish to improve their spoken Modern Greek. For more information, contact Prof. Vangelis Calotychos at ec2268@columbia.edu.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GRKM W1211
GRKM
1211
76197
001
F 11:00a - 11:50a
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V3012x Augustan Poetry 3 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V1202 or the equivalent. Selections from Vergil and Horace. Combines literary analysis with work in grammar and metrics.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3012
LATN
3012
26170
001
MW 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
G. Williams 11 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK V3015x Philo of Alexandria: Historical Essays and the Contemplative Life We will read in the original language selections from three treatises -- In Flaccum, Legatio ad Gaium, and De Vita Contemplativa -- of Philo of Alexandria; aside from their importance as Imperial Greek texts, these essays provide essential and very rare evidence for the environment (early Imperial Alexandria) and thought of their author.


Classical Civilization


CLCV V3101x The Archaeology of Ancient Egypt and Nubia 3 pts. Thanks to the pyramids of Giza, the treasure of Tutankhamun, and other remains of royal activity, pharaonic Egypt is justly famous for its monuments and material culture. Equally fascinating, if less well known, however, are the towns, fortresses, cultic centers, domestic spaces, and non-elite cemeteries that have been excavated over the past 200 years or so. The archaeology of Nubia is also little known but fascinating on many levels. This course will focus on what archaeology can reveal about life as it was experienced by individuals of all social classes. Through a combination of broad surveys and case studies of some of Egypt and Nubia's most culturally indicative and intriguing sites, we will explore issues such as the origins of inequality, state formation and its effects, the uneasy mix of state-planned settlements and village life, urbanism, domestic and community worship, gendered spaces, ethnicity and colonialism, religious revolution and evolution, bureaucracy, private enterprise, and the effects of governmental collapse on life and death in ancient Egypt and Nubia.

CLCV V3158x Women in Antiquity 3 pts. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None. Examines the role of women in ancient Greek and Latin literature; the portrayal of women in literature as opposed to their actual social status; male and female in ancient Mediterranean cosmologies; readings from ancient epics, lyric drama, history, historical documents, medical texts, oratory, and philosophy, as well as from contemporary sociological and anthropological works that help to analyze the origins of the Western attitude toward women.


Greek


GREK V3309x Selections from Greek Lit: Herodotus 3 pts. Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V3309
GREK
3309
02073
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
H. Foley 4 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V3309x Latin Literature Selections: The Roman Novel 3 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V3012 or the equivalent. Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3309
LATN
3309
10999
001
TBA Instructor To Be Announced 2 [ More Info ]

Open only to students enrolled in the post-baccalaureate certificate program in Classics.

LATN W3908x The Post-Baccalaureate Seminar 3 pts. This seminar aims to provide students in the post-baccalaureate certificate program with opportunities 1) to (re-)familiarize themselves with a selection of major texts from classical antiquity, which will be read in English, 2) to become acquainted with scholarship on these texts and with scholarly writing in general, 3) to write analytically about these texts and the interpretations posed about them in contemporary scholarship, and 4) to read in the original language selected passages of one of the texts in small tutorial groups, which will meet every week for an additional hour with members of the faculty.


Greek


Open only to students enrolled in the post-baccalaureate certificate program in Classics.

GREK W3980x The Post-Baccalaureate Seminar 3 pts. This seminar aims to provide students in the post-baccalaureate certificate program with opportunities 1) to (re-)familiarize themselves with a selection of major texts from classical antiquity, which will be read in English, 2) to become acquainted with scholarship on these texts and with scholarly writing in general, 3) to write analytically about these texts and the interpretations posed about them in contemporary scholarship, and 4) to read in the original language selected passages of one of the texts in small tutorial groups, which will meet every week for an additional hour with members of the faculty.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK W3980
GREK
3980
27499
001
F 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
E. Scharffenberger 1 [ More Info ]

Ancient Studies


ANCS V3995x The Major Seminar 3 pts. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Required for the Ancient Studies major. The topic changes from year to year but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major. Past topics include: love, dining, slavery, space, power.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANCS V3995
ANCS
3995
28764
001
TBA M. Folch 1 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK V3996x The Major Seminar 3 pts. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Required for all majors in classics and classical studies. The topic changes from year to year but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major. Past topics include: love, dining, slavery, space, power.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V3996
GREK
3996
75041
001
Th 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
M. Folch 2 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V3996x The Major Seminar 3 pts. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Required for all majors in Classics and Classical Studies. The topic changes from year to year but is always broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major. Past topics include: love, dining, slavery, space, power.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3996
LATN
3996
12543
001
TBA M. Folch 7 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK V3997x and y Directed Readings 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the director of undergraduate studies. A program of reading in Greek literature, to be tested by a series of short papers, one long paper, or an oral or written examination.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V3997
GREK
3997
07842
006
TBA K. Milnor 0 [ More Info ]

Modern Greek


GRKM V3997x and y Directed Readings 1-4 pts. Designed for undergraduates who want to do directed reading in a period or on a topic not covered in the curriculum.


Latin


LATN V3997x and y Directed Readings in Latin Literature 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the director of undergraduate studies. A program of reading in Latin literature, to be tested by a series of short papers, one long paper, or an oral or written examination.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3997
LATN
3997
08335
012
TBA N. Worman 0 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK V3998x and y Supervised Research 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the director of undergraduate studies. A program of research in Greek literature. Research paper required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V3998
GREK
3998
03482
012
TBA N. Worman 0 [ More Info ]

Modern Greek


GRKM V3998x and y Senior Research Seminar 1-4 pts. Designed for students writing a senior thesis or doing advanced research on Greek or Greek Diaspora topics.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GRKM V3998
GRKM
3998
10709
001
TBA S. Gourgouris 0 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V3998x and y Supervised Research in Latin Literature 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the director of undergraduate studies. A program of research in Latin literature. Research paper required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3998
LATN
3998
04109
006
TBA K. Milnor 1 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
05301
012
TBA N. Worman 0 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK W4009x Sophocles 3 pts. Prerequisites: GREK V1201 and V1202 or their equivalent. Since the content of the course changes from year to year, it may be taken in consecutive years.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK W4009
GREK
4009
28477
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
M. Folch 2 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN W4009x Selections from Latin Literature: Roman Comedy 3 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V3012 or the equivalent. Since the content of this course changes from year to year, it may be repeated for credit.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN W4009
LATN
4009
15398
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
G. Williams 2 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK W4105x History of Greek Literature I 4 pts. Prerequisites: At least two terms of Greek at the 3000 level or higher. Readings in Greek literature from Homer to the 4th century B.C.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK W4105
GREK
4105
23384
001
TuTh 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
D. Steiner 0 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN W4105x Latin Literature of the Republic 4 pts. Prerequisites: At least two terms of Latin at the 3000 level or higher. Latin literature from the beginning to early Augustan times.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN W4105
LATN
4105
17345
001
MW 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
K. Volk 2 [ More Info ]

LATN W4139x Elements of Prose Style 3 pts. Prerequisites: At least four semesters of Latin, or the equivalent. Intensive review of Latin syntax with translation of English sentences and paragraphs into Latin.


Classical Literature


CLLT W4300x The Classical Tradition 3 pts. Overview of Greek and Roman literature. Close analysis of selected texts from the major genres accompanied by lectures on literary history. Topics include the context out of which the genres arose, the suitability of various modern critical approaches to the ancient texts, the problem of translation, and the transmission of the classical authors and their influence on modern literature.


Modern Greek


GRKM W4300x (Section 01) Worlding Cavafy: Desire & Media 4 pts. C. P. Cavafy, a poet of the Greek Diaspora in Alexandria, had a profound influence on writers such as E.M. Forster, Marguerite Yourcenar, and James Merrill as well as artists such David Hockney and Duane Michaels. By examining Cavafy's work in all its permutations (as criticism, translation, adaptation), this course introduces students to a wide range of critical approaches used in Comparative Literature, Gender Studies, and Translation Studies. The Cavafy case becomes an experimental ground for different kinds of critical methods, those that engage social-historical issues such as sexuality, diaspora, postcoloniality as well as linguistic issues such as multilingualism, translation and media. How does this poet "at a slight angle to the universe" challenge contemporary theories of gender and literature as national institution? How can studying a canonical author open up our theories and practices of translation? To what extent are translations and adaptations hermeneutic acts? What do they tell us about the receiving culture as well as the source culture? What will our own translation project be? Though this course presupposes no knowledge of Greek, students wanting to read Cavafy in the original are encouraged to take the 1-credit directed reading tutorial offered simultaneously.


Classical Civilization


CLCV G6066x (Section 01) Ancient Cities: Urbanism in the Near Eastern and Mediterranean World 3 pts. In this seminar we will explore a wide variety of ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean cities, as well as the theoretical frameworks that inform their development, growth, and contraction over time. Cities thrive for different reasons; some are grounded on trade and markets, others on sacred centers or military bases, while others are fashioned as if from scratch to fit a particular political ideology. In addition to reading texts focussing on specific cities and on overarching issues, each of you will develop an expertise on one particular city and will examine issues of broad interest as they are manifest in that city. Such issues include city-planning vs. organic growth, the position of the city within a general settlement pattern, its relationship to its hinterland, its political status, neighborhoods, ethnic enclaves, slums, topography, landscape, markets, industry, temples, palaces, memorials, and arenas to showcase political, sacred, and spectacular performance.


Greek


GREK V1101x-V1102y Elementary Full-Year Course 4 pts. Prerequisites: GREK V1101 is prerequisite to GREK V1102. No credit is given for GERK V1101 unless GREK V1102 is completed. Grammar, composition, and reading.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1101
GREK
1101
65467
001
MWF 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
E. Rudoni 0 [ More Info ]
GREK
1101
24276
002
MW 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
S. Oppen 6 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1102
GREK
1102
17200
001
TuTh 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
S. McVane 0 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V1101x or y-V1102 Elementary Full-Year Course 4 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V1101 is normally prerequisite to LATN V1102. LATN V1102 may be taken without LATN V1101 by permission of the instructor. No credit is given for LATN V1101 until LATN V1102 is completed. V 1101: Grammar, composition and reading.

V 1102: Complete review of grammar and syntax; emphasis on representative readings.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1101
LATN
1101
63988
001
TuThF 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 2 [ More Info ]
LATN
1101
16318
002
MW 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
A. Conser 2 [ More Info ]
LATN
1101
27544
003
MW 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 5 / 20 [ More Info ]
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1102
LATN
1102
65450
001
TBA C. Catenaccio 4 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK V1121x or y Intensive Elementary Course 4 pts. Designed to cover all of Greek grammar and syntax in one semester in order to prepare a student to enter third-semester Greek.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1121
GREK
1121
74226
001
MWF 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V1121 Intensive Elementary Latin 4 pts. Designed to cover all of Latin grammar and syntax in one semester in order to prepare student to enter third-semester Latin.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1121
LATN
1121
70513
001
MWF 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 2 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK V1201x or y Intermediate Greek: Prose and Poetry 4 pts. Prerequisites: GREK V1101 - V1102 or V1121. Selections from Plato.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1201
GREK
1201
08819
001
MW 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
N. Worman 8 / 25 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V1201y Intermediate Latin I 4 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V1101 - V1102 or 2 - 3 years of high school Latin. Selections from Catullus and from Cicero or Caesar.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1201
LATN
1201
11376
001
MWF 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
E. Jewell 2 [ More Info ]
LATN
1201
62697
002
MW 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
U. Poole 6 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK V1202x or y Selections from Homer 4 pts. Prerequisites: GREK V1101-V1102 or V1121, or permission of the instructor. Detailed grammatical and literary study of several books of the Iliad and introduction to the techniques of oral poetry, to the Homeric hexameter, and to the historical background of Homer.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V1202
GREK
1202
12196
001
TuThF 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
D. Steiner 2 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V1202y Intermediate Latin II 4 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V1201 or 3 - 4 years of high school Latin. Selections from Ovid, Metamorphoses, and Sallust, Livy, Seneca, or Phiny.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V1202
LATN
1202
17833
001
TuTh 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
Z. Herz 5 [ More Info ]

LATN V3012x Augustan Poetry 3 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V1202 or four years of high school Latin. Selections from Virgil and Horace. Combines literary analysis with work in grammar and metrics.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3012
LATN
3012
26170
001
MW 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
G. Williams 11 [ More Info ]

Classical Civilization


CLCV V3101x or y Archaeology and Egypt and Nubia 3 pts. Examines ancient Egyptian and Nubian towns, temples, cemeteries, fortresses, and other material remains. Subjects of interest include the origins of inequality, state formation, urbanism, state and private religion, gendered spaces, ethnicity, colonialism, religious revolution bureaucracy, private enterprise, and governmental collapse.


Classical Literature


CLLT V3132x and y Classical Myth 3 pts. Survey of major myths from the ancient Near East to the advent of Christianity, with emphasis upon the content and treatment of myths in classical authors (Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Euripides, Sophocles, Vergil, Livy, Ovid).


Greek


GREK V3309y Selections from Greek Literature: Rhetoric 3 pts. Prerequisites: Greek V1201-1202, or their equivalents. Content of this course changes year to year; it may be taken in consecutive years.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V3309
GREK
3309
02073
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
H. Foley 4 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V3309y Selections from Latin Literature: Poetry 3 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V3012 or the equivalent. Content of course changes from year to year, it may be taken for credit in consecutive years.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3309
LATN
3309
10999
001
TBA Instructor To Be Announced 2 [ More Info ]

LATN V3310x Selections from Latin Literature: Poetry 3 pts. Prerequisites: Prerequisite: LATN V3012 or the equivalent. Content of course changes from year to year; it may be taken for credit in consecutive years.


Ancient Studies


ANCS V3995x Senior Seminar in Ancient Studies 3 pts.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANCS V3995
ANCS
3995
28764
001
TBA M. Folch 1 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V3996 The Major Seminar 3 pts. Required for all majors in classics and classical studies. The topic will change from year to year, but will always be broad enough to accommodate students in the languages as well as those in the interdisciplinary major.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3996
LATN
3996
12543
001
TBA M. Folch 7 [ More Info ]

Ancient Studies


ANCS V3997x and y Directed Readings in Ancient Studies 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the departmental representative required. Program of readings in some aspect of Ancient Studies, supervised by an appropriate faculty member chosen from the departments offering Ancient Studies courses. Testing by a series of essays, one long paper, or oral or written examination(s).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ANCS V3997
ANCS
3997
05460
012
TBA N. Worman 0 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V3997 Directed Readings in Latin Literature 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the department chair required. To be tested by a series of short papers, one long paper, or an oral or written examination.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3997
LATN
3997
08335
012
TBA N. Worman 0 [ More Info ]

Ancient Studies


ANCS V3998x Directed Research in Ancient Studies 3 pts. Prerequisites: Permission of the departmental representative required. Program of research in Ancient Studies. Research paper required. The topic must be submitted to the department representative and the appropriate adviser decided upon by April 1 of the semester preceding that in which the student will be enrolled in the course. The student and the departmental representative will request supervision of the research paper from an appropriate faculty member in a department offering Ancient Studies courses.


Greek


GREK V3998 Supervised Research in Greek Literature 3 pts. Requires direct approval from instructor and department. Program of research in Greek literature, with the composition of a paper embodying results.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK V3998
GREK
3998
03482
012
TBA N. Worman 0 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN V3998 Supervised Research in Latin Literature 3 pts. Prerequisites: Requires direct approval from instructor and department. A program of research in Latin literature with the composition of a paper embodying results.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN V3998
LATN
3998
04109
006
TBA K. Milnor 1 [ More Info ]
LATN
3998
05301
012
TBA N. Worman 0 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK W4009y Selections from Greek Literature: Prose 3 pts. Content of course changes from year to year; it may be taken in consecutive years. Fall 2010: Aeschylus

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK W4009
GREK
4009
28477
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
M. Folch 2 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN W4009x Selections from Latin Literature: Prose 3 pts. Prerequisites: LATN V3012 or the equivalent. Content of course changes year to year; it may be taken in consecutive years.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN W4009
LATN
4009
15398
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
G. Williams 2 [ More Info ]

Greek


GREK W4010x Selections from Greek Literature: Poetry 3 pts. Prerequisites: GREK V 1201 - 1202; or their equivalents. Content of course changes from year to year; it may be taken in consecutive years.

GREK W4105x History of Greek Literature I 4 pts. Prerequisites: At least two terms of Greek beyond GREK V1201, V1202. Lectures based on extensive readings in Greek literature from Homer to the 4th century C.E.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: GREK W4105
GREK
4105
23384
001
TuTh 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
D. Steiner 0 [ More Info ]

Latin


LATN W4105x Latin Literature of the Republic 4 pts. Prerequisites: At least two terms of Latin beyond LATN V3012. Lectures based on extensive readings in Latin literature from the beginning to the fourth century.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: LATN W4105
LATN
4105
17345
001
MW 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
K. Volk 2 [ More Info ]

Classical Literature


CLLT W4300x or y Classical Tradition 3 pts. Overview of Greek and Roman literature. Close analysis of selected texts from the major genres accompanied by lectures on literary history. Topics include the context of which the genres rose. the suitability of various modern critical approaches to the ancient texts, the problem of translation, and the transmission of the classical authors and their influence on modern literature.


Classical Civilization


CLCV W4411x or y Egypt in the Classical World 4 pts. This class traces Egypt's evolving integration into the Classical World from the Saite Dynasty (c. 685 BCE) to the suppression of paganism by the Coptic church. We'll pay close attention to the flashpoints that created conflicts between pagan Egyptians, Greeks, Jews, and Christians and also to integrative aspects of society.


Humanities


HUMA C1001x-C1002y Masterpieces of Western Literature and Philosophy 4 pts. Taught by members of the Departments of Classics, English and Comparative Literature, French, German, Italian, Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religion, Slavic Languages, and Spanish; and members of the Society of Fellows. Major works by over twenty authors, ranging in time, theme, and genre from Homer to Virginia Woolf. Students are expected to write at least two papers, to complete two examinations each semester, and to participate actively in class discussions.


Contemporary Civilization


COCI C1101x-C1102y Introduction To Contemporary Civilization 4 pts.Taught by members of the Departments of Anthropology, Classics, English and Comparative Literature, French, German, History, Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Political Science, Religion, Slavic Languages, and Sociology; and members of the Society of Fellows. A study in their historical context of major contributions to the intellectual traditions that underpin contemporary civilization. Emphasis is on the history of political, social, and philosophical thought. Students are expected to write at least three papers to complete two examinations, and to participate actively in class discussions.


Humanities


HUMA W1121x or y Masterpieces of Western Art 3 pts. Discussion and analysis of the artistic qualities and significance of selected works of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Parthenon in Athens to works of the 20th century.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor
Autumn 2014 :: HUMA W1121
HUMA
1121
21994
001
MW 8:40a - 9:55a
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
10916
002
MW 8:40a - 9:55a
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
77080
003
MW 8:40a - 9:55a
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
17176
004
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
25659
005
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
20156
006
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
75667
007
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
61583
008
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
23331
009
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
20641
010
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
74040
011
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
69914
012
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
12024
013
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
19353
014
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
62985
015
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
29536
016
MW 4:10p - 5:25p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
16002
017
MW 4:10p - 5:25p
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
60186
018
MW 4:10p - 5:25p
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
14518
019
TuTh 8:40a - 9:55a
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
75008
020
TuTh 8:40a - 9:55a
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
20109
021
TuTh 8:40a - 9:55a
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
27725
022
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
77416
023
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
26370
024
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
73932
025
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
72661
026
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
68328
027
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
12081
028
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
10222
029
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
22513
030
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
72877
031
TuTh 4:10p - 5:25p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
29128
032
TuTh 4:10p - 5:25p
607 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
64588
033
TuTh 4:10p - 5:25p
608 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]
HUMA
1121
73803
034
TuTh 5:40p - 6:55p
604 SCHERMERHORN HALL
Instructor To Be Announced [ More Info ]

Comparative Literature


CPLT BC3001x Introduction to Comparative Literature 3 pts. Introduction to the study of literature from a comparative and cross-disciplinary perspective. Readings will be selected to promote reflection on such topics as the relation of literature to the other arts; nationalism and literature; international literary movements; post-colonial literature; gender and literature; and issues of authorship, influence, originality, and intertextuality.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CPLT BC3001
CPLT
3001
02326
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
B. O'Keeffe 1 [ More Info ]

CPLT BC3110x Introduction to Translation Studies 3 pts. Prerequisites: Completion of the Language Requirement or equivalent. Introduction to the major theories and methods of translation in the Western tradition, along with practical work in translating. Topics include translation in the context of postcolonialism, globalization and immigration, the role of translators in war and zones of conflict, gender and translation, the importance of translation to contemporary writers.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CPLT BC3110
CPLT
3110
09674
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
P. Connor 6 [ More Info ]

Comparative Literature and Society


CPLS BC3162x The Novella from Cervantes to Kafka 3 pts. The novella, older than the novel, painstakingly crafted, links the worlds of ideas and fiction. The readings present the novella as a genre, tracing its progress from the 17th century to the 20th. Each text read in the comparative milieu, grants the reader access to the intellectual concerns of an era.

CPLS BC3200x The Visual and Verbal Arts 3 pts. Analysis and discussion of the relation of literature to painting, photography, and film. Emphasis on artistic and literary concepts concerning the visual dimension of narrative and poetic texts from Homer to Burroughs. Explores the role of description, illustration, and montage in realist and modern literature.

CPLS V3675x Mad Love 3 pts. The history of irrational love as embodied in literary and non-literary texts throughout the Western tradition. Readings include the Bible, Greek, Roman, Medieval, and modern texts.


Interdepartmental Seminars


INSM W3920x Nobility and Civility 4 pts. Prerequisites: One semester of Contemporary Civilization or Literature Humanities, or an equivalent course, and the instructor's permission. A team-taught multicultural, interdisciplinary course examining traditions of leadership and citizenship as they appear in the key texts of early Indian, Islamic, Far Eastern, and Western civilizations. One goal is to identify and examine common human values and issues evident in these texts while also recognizing key cultural differences. Global Core.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: INSM W3920
INSM
3920
15409
001
W 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
W. De Bary 28 [ More Info ]

INSM W3921x Nobility and Civility II 4 pts.Global Core.


Computer Science


COMS W1001x and y Introduction to Information Science 3 pts. Lect: 3. Basic Introduction to concepts and skills in Information Sciences: human-computer interfaces, representing information digitally, organizing and searching information on the World Wide Web, principles of algorithmic problem solving, introduction to database concepts, introduction to programming in Python. Science Requirement: Partial Fulfillment.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W1001
COMS
1001
72549
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
B. Xie 19 / 40 [ More Info ]

COMS W1004x and y Introduction to Computer Science and Programming in Java 3 pts. Lect: 3. A general introduction to computer science for science and engineering students interested in majoring in computer science or engineering. Covers fundamental concepts of computer science, algorithmic problem-solving capabilities, and introductory Java programming skills. Assumes no prior programming background. Columbia University students may receive credit for only one of the following two courses: 1004 and 1005.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W1004
COMS
1004
87197
001
MW 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
A. Cannon 85 / 400 [ More Info ]

COMS W1005x and y Introduction to Computer Science and Programming in MATLAB 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None A general introduction to computer science concepts, algorithmic problem-solving capabilities, and programming skills in MATLAB. Assumes no prior programming background. Columbia University students may receive credit for only one of the following two courses: 1004 and 1005.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W1005
COMS
1005
91748
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
P. Blaer 24 / 150 [ More Info ]

Engineering


ENGI E1006x and y Introduction to Computing for Engineers and Applied Scientists 3 pts. An interdisciplinary course in computing intended for first year SEAS students. Introduces computational thinking, algorithmic problem solving and Python programming with applications in science and engineering. Assumes no prior programming background.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ENGI E1006
ENGI
1006
25509
001
MW 5:40p - 6:55p
TBA
A. Cannon 22 / 200 [ More Info ]

Computer Science


COMS W1007x and y Honors introduction to Computer Science 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: AP Computer Science with a grade of 4 or 5 or similar experience. An honors-level introduction to computer science, intended primarily for students considering a major in computer science. Computer science as a science of abstraction. Creating models for reasoning about and solving problems. The basic elements of computers and computer programs. Implementing abstractions using data structures and algorithms. Taught in java.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W1007
COMS
1007
76031
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
J. Kender 12 / 90 [ More Info ]

COMS W1404x and y (Section 1) Emerging Scholars Program Seminar 1-1 pts. pass/fail only Corequisites: COMS W1004/1007 or ENGI E1006. Enrollment with
instructor permission only. Peer led weekly seminar intended for first and second year undergraduates considering a major in Computer Science. Pass/Fail only. May not be used towards satisfying the major or SEAS credit requirements.


Electrical Engineering - Computer Science - Biomedical Engin


ECBM E3060x Introduction to Genomic Information Science and Technology 3 pts. Lect: 3. Introduction to the information system paradigm of molecular biology. Representation, organization, structure, function and manipulation of the biomolecular sequences of nucleic acids and proteins. The role of enzymes and gene regulatory elements in natural biological functions as well as in biotechnology and genetic engineering. Recombination and other macromolecular processes viewed as mathematical operations with simulation and visualization using simple computer programming. This course shares lectures with ECBM E4060, but the work requirements differ somewhat.


Computer Science


COMS W3101x and y Programming Languages 1 pt. Lect: 1. Prerequisites: Fluency in at least one programming language. Introduction to a programming language. Each section is devoted to a specific language. Intended only for those who are already fluent in at least one programming language. Sections may meet for one hour per week for the whole term, for three hours per week for the first third of the term, or for two hours per week for the first six weeks. May be repeated for credit if different languages are involved.

COMS W3134x and y Data structures in Java 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W1004 or knowledge of Java. Data types and structures: arrays, stacks, singly and doubly linked lists, queues, trees, sets, and graphs. Programming techniques for processing such structures: sorting and searching, hashing, garbage collection. Storage management. Rudiments of the analysis of algorithms. Taught in Java. Note: Due to significant overlap, students may receive credit for only one of the following three courses: COMS W3134, COMS W3136, COMS W3137

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W3134
COMS
3134
82782
001
MW 5:40p - 6:55p
TBA
A. Pasik 63 / 160 [ More Info ]

COMS W3136y (Section 1) Data Structures with C/C++ 4-4 pts. Prerequisites: COMS W1004, W1005, W1007 or ENGI E1006 A second programming course intended for non-majors with at least one semester of introductory programming experience. Basic elements of programming in C and C++, array-based data structures, heaps, linked lists, C programming in UNIX environment, object-oriented programming in C++, trees, graphs, generic programming, hash tables.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W3136
COMS
3136
74256
001
TuTh 5:40p - 6:55p
TBA
J. Lee 46 / 100 [ More Info ]

COMS W3137x and y Honors Data Structures and Algorithms 4 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W1007. Corequisites: COMS W3203. An honors introduction to data types and structures: arrays, stacks, singly and doubly linked lists, queues, trees, sets, and graphs. Programming techniques for processing such structures: sorting and searching, hashing, garbage collection. Storage management. Design and analysis of algorithms. Taught in Java. Note: Due to significant overlap, students may receive credit for only one of the following three courses: COMS W3134, W3136, or W3137.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W3137
COMS
3137
69169
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
S. Hershkop 13 / 120 [ More Info ]

COMS W3157x and y Advanced Programming 4 pts. Lect: 4. Prerequisites: Two semesters of programming experience. Practical, hands-on introduction to programming techniques and tools for professional software construction, including learning how to write code to given specifications as well as document the results. Provides introductory overview of C and C++ in a UNIX environment, for students with Java background. Also introduces scripting languages (perl) and basic web programming. UNIX programming utilities are also covered. Lab Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W3157
COMS
3157
61998
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
J. Lee 108 / 200 [ More Info ]

COMS W3203x and y Discrete Mathematics: Introduction to Combinatorics and Graph Theory 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: Any introductory course in computer programming. Logic and formal proofs, sequences and summation, mathematical induction, binomial coefficients, elements of finite probability, recurrence relations, equivalence relations and partial orderings, and topics in graph theory (including isomorphism, traversability, planarity, and colorings).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W3203
COMS
3203
70547
001
TuTh 5:40p - 6:55p
TBA
D. Strickland 81 / 150 [ More Info ]

COMS W3251x Computational Linear Algebra 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: two terms of calculus. Computational linear algebra, solution of linear systems, sparse linear systems, least squares, eigenvalue problems, and numerical solution of other multivariate problems as time permits.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W3251
COMS
3251
72480
001
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
A. Papageorgiou 80 / 80 [ More Info ]

COMS W3261x and y Computer Science Theory 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W3203 Corequisites: COMS W3134, W3136, or W3137 Regular languages: deterministic and non-deterministic finite automata, regular expressions. Context-free languages: context-free grammars, push-down automata. Turing machines, the Chomsky hierarchy, and the Church-Turing thesis. Introduction to Complexity Theory and NP-Completeness.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W3261
COMS
3261
61565
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
A. Aho 100 / 100 [ More Info ]

Computer Science - Electrical Engineering


CSEE W3827x and y Fundamentals of Computer Systems 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: An introductory programming course. Fundamentals of computer organization and digital logic. Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, basic gates and components, flipflops and latches, counters and state machines, basics of combinational and sequential digital design. Assembly language, instruction sets, ALU's, single-cycle and multi-cycle processor design, introduction to pipelined processors, caches, and virtual memory.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CSEE W3827
CSEE
3827
70196
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
M. Kim 82 / 130 [ More Info ]

Computer Science


COMS W3902x and y Undergraduate Thesis 1-6 pts. Prerequisites: Agreement by a faculty member to serve as thesis adviser. An independent theoretical or experimental investigation by an undergraduate major of an appropriate problem in computer science carried out under the supervision of a faculty member. A formal written report is mandatory and an oral presentation may also be required. May be taken over more than one term, in which case the grade is deferred until all 6 points have been completed. Consult the department for section assignment.

COMS W3995x or y Special Topics in Computer Science 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Consult the department for section assignment. Special topics arranged as the need and availability arise. Topics are usually offered on a one-time basis. Since the content of this course changes each time it is offered, it may be repeated for credit.

COMS W3998x and y Undergraduate Projects in Computer Science 1-3 pts. Prerequisites: approval by a faculty member who agrees to supervise the work. Independent project involving laboratory work, computer programming, analytical investigation, or engineering design. May be repeated for credit, but not for a total of more than 3 points of degree credit. Consult the department for section assignment.


Electrical Engineering - Computer Science - Biomedical Engin


ECBM E4060x Introduction to Genomic Information 3 pts. Lect: 3. Introduction to the information system paradigm of molecular biology. Representation, organization, structure, function, and manipulation of the biomolecular sequences of nucleic acids and proteins. The role of enzymes and gene regulatory elements in natural biological functions as well as in biotechnology and genetic engineering. Recombination and other macromolecular processes viewed as mathematical operations with simulation and visualization using simple computer programming. This course shares lectures with ECBM E3060, but the work requirements differ somewhat.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: ECBM E4060
ECBM
4060
69462
001
M 7:00p - 9:30p
TBA
D. Anastassiou 3 [ More Info ]

Computer Science


COMS W4111x and y Introduction to Databases 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W3134, W3136, or W3137, fluency in Java; or permission of the instructor. The fundamentals of database design and application development using databases: entity-relationship modeling, logical design of relational databases, relational data definition and manipulation languages, SQL, XML, query processing, physical database tuning, transaction processing, security. Programming projects are required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4111
COMS
4111
27519
001
Tu 1:10p - 3:40p
TBA
A. Biliris 70 / 70 [ More Info ]

COMS W4115x and y Programming Languages and Translators 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W3134, W3136, or W3137 (or equivalent), W3261, and CSEE W3827, or the instructor's permission. Modern programming languages and compiler design. Imperative, object-oriented, declarative, functional, and scripting languages. Language syntax, control structures, data types, procedures and parameters, binding, scope, run-time organization, and exception handling. Implementation of language translation tools including compilers and interpreters. Lexical, syntactic and semantic analysis; code generation; introduction to code optimization. Teams implement a language and its compiler.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4115
COMS
4115
22163
001
MW 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
S. Edwards 90 / 90 [ More Info ]

COMS W4117x or y Compilers and Interpreters 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W4115 or the instructor's permission. Continuation of COMS W4115, with broader and deeper investigation into the design and implementation of contemporary language translators, be they compilers or interpreters. Topics include: parsing, semantic analysis, code generation and optimization, run-time environments, and compiler-compilers. A programming project is required.

COMS W4118x and y Operating Systems I 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: CSEE W3827 and knowledge of C and programming tools as covered in W3136, W3157, or W3101, or the instructor's permission. Design and implementation of operating systems. Topics include process management, process synchronization and interprocess communication, memory management, virtual memory, interrupt handling, processor scheduling, device management, I/O, and file systems. Case study of the UNIX operating system. A programming project is required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4118
COMS
4118
76240
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
J. Nieh 85 / 150 [ More Info ]

Computer Science - Electrical Engineering


CSEE W4119x and y Computer Networks 3 pts. Lect: 3. Corequisites: SIEO W3600 or IEOR E3658 or equivalent Introduction to computer networks and the technical foundations of the Internet, including applications, protocols, local area networks, algorithms for routing and congestion control, security, elementary performance evaluation. Several written and programming assignments required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CSEE W4119
CSEE
4119
23795
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
V. Misra 52 / 140 [ More Info ]

Computer Science


COMS W4130x Principles and Practice of Parallel Programming 3 pts. Prerequisites: Experience in Java, basic understanding of analysis of algorithms. COMS W3134, W3136, or W3137 (or equivalent). Principles of parallel software design. Topics include task and data decomposition, load-balancing, reasoning about correctness, determinacy, safety, and deadlock-freedom. Application of techniques through semester-long design project implementing performant, parallel application in a modern parallel programming language.


Computer Science - Electrical Engineering


CSEE W4140x or y Networking Laboratory 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: CSEE 4119 or equivalent In this course, students will learn how to put "principles into practice," in a hands-on-networking lab course. The course will cover the technologies and proctocols of the internet using equipment currently available to large internet service providers such as CISCO routers and end-systems. A set of laboratory experiments will provide hands-on experience with engineering wide-area networks and will familiarize students with the Internet Protocol (IP), Address Resolution Protocal (ARP), Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP), User Datagram Protocol (UDP) and Transmission Control Protocol (TCP), the Domain Name System (DNS), routing protocols (RIP, OSPF, BGP), network management protocols (SNMP, and application-level protocols (FTP, TELNET, SMTP).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CSEE W4140
CSEE
4140
28073
001
TBA Instructor To Be Announced 18 / 30 [ More Info ]

Computer Science


COMS W4156x Advanced Software Engineering 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: Substantial software development experience in Java, C++ or C# beyond the level of COMS W3157. Corequisites: Recommended COMS W4111 Software lifecycle from the viewpoint of designing and implementing N-tier applications (typically utilizing web browser, web server, application server, database). Major emphasis on quality assurance (code inspection, unit and integration testing, security and stress testing). Centers on a student-designed team project that leverages component services (e.g., transactions, resource pooling, publish/subscribe) for an interactive multi-user application such as a simple game.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4156
COMS
4156
68576
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
G. Kaiser 27 / 80 [ More Info ]

COMS W4162x or y Advanced Computer Graphics 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W4160 or equivalent, or instructor's permission. A second course in computer graphics covering more advanced topics including image and signal processing, geometric modeling with meshes, advanced image synthesis including ray tracing and global illumination, and other topics as time permits. Emphasis will be placed both on implementation of systems and important mathematical and geometric concepts such as Fourier analysis, mesh algorithms and subdivision, and Monte Carlo sampling for rendering. Note: Course will be taught every two years.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4162
COMS
4162
60624
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
C. Zheng 10 / 40 [ More Info ]

COMS W4167x or y Computer Animation 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: Multivariable calculus, linear algebra, C++ programming proficiency. COMS W4156 recommended. Theory and practice of physics-based animation algorithms, including animated clothing, hair, smoke, water, collisions, impact, and kitchen sinks. Topics covered: Integration of ordinary differential equations, formulation of physical models, treatment of discontinuities including collisions/contact, animation control, constrained Lagrangian Mechanics, friction/dissipation, continuum mechanics, finite elements, rigid bodies, thin shells, discretization of Navier-Stokes equations.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4167
COMS
4167
69154
001
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
E. Grinspun 26 [ More Info ]

COMS W4170x User Interface Design 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W3134, W3136, or W3137. Introduction to the theory and practice of computer user interface design, emphasizing the software design of graphical user interfaces. Topics include basic interaction devices and techniques, human factors, interaction styles, dialogue design, and software infrastructure. Design and programming projects are required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4170
COMS
4170
27751
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
S. Feiner 80 / 80 [ More Info ]

COMS W4180x or y Network Security 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W3134, W3136, or W3137 and W4119, or the instructor's permission. Introduction to network security concepts and mechanisms. Foundations of network security and an in-depth review of commonly-used security mechanisms and techniques, security threats and network-based attacks, applications of cryptography, authentication, access control, intrusion detection and response, security protocols (IPsec, SSL, Kerberos), denial of service, viruses and worms, software vulnerabilities, web security, wireless security, and privacy.

COMS W4187x or y Security Architecture and Engineering 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W4118; W4180 and/or W4119 recommended. Secure programming. Cryptograhic engineering and key handling. Access controls. Tradeoffs in security design. Design for security.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4187
COMS
4187
11868
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
S. Bellovin 41 / 70 [ More Info ]

COMS W4205x Combinatorial Theory 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W3203 and a course in calculus. Sequences and recursions, calculus of finite differences and sums, elementary number theory, permutation group structures, binomial coefficients, Stilling numbers, harmonic numbers, generating functions.


Computer Science and Operations Research


CSOR W4231x Analysis of Algorithms I 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W3134, W3136, or W3137, and W3203. Introduction to the design and analysis of efficient algorithms. Topics include models of computation, efficient sorting and searching, algorithms for algebraic problems, graph algorithms, dynamic programming, probabilistic methods, approximation algorithms, and NP-completeness.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CSOR W4231
CSOR
4231
28745
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
M. Yannakakis 33 / 120 [ More Info ]

Computer Science


COMS W4236y Introduction to Computational Complexity 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W3261. Develops a quantitative theory of the computational difficulty of problems in terms of the resources (eg. time, space) needed to solve them. Classification of problems into complexity classes, reductions and completeness. Power and limitations of different modes of computation such as nondeterminism, randomization, interaction and parallelism.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4236
COMS
4236
20600
001
TuTh 7:10p - 8:25p
TBA
X. Chen 5 / 40 [ More Info ]

COMS W4241y Numerical Algorithms and Complexity 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: Knowledge of a programming language. Some knowledge of scientific computation is desirable. Modern theory and practice of computation on digital computers. Introduction to concepts of computational complexity. Design and analysis of numerical algorithms. Applications to computational finance, computational science, and computational engineering.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4241
COMS
4241
20916
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
J. Traub 16 / 50 [ More Info ]

COMS W4252x or y Introduction to Computational Learning Theory 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: CSOR W4231 or COMS W4236 or COMS W3203 and permission of instructor or COMS W3261 and permission of instructor. Possibilities and limitations of performing learning by computational agents. Topics include computational models of learning, polynomial time learnability, learning from examples and learning from queries to oracles. Computational and statistical limitations of learning. Applications to Boolean functions, geometric functions, automata.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4252
COMS
4252
72540
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
R. Servedio 27 / 100 [ More Info ]

COMS W4261x or y Introduction to Cryptography 3 pts. Lect: 2.5. Prerequisites: Comfort with basic discrete math and probability. Recommended: COMS W3261 or CSOR W4231. An introduction to modern cryptography, focusing on the complexity-theoretic foundations of secure computation and communication in adversarial environments; a rigorous approach, based on precise definitions and provably secure protocols. Topics include private and public key encryption schemes, digital signatures, authentication, pseudorandom generators and functions, one-way functions, trapdoor functions, number theory and computational hardness, identification and zero knowledge protocols.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4261
COMS
4261
61801
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
T. Malkin 30 / 30 [ More Info ]

COMS W4281x or y Introduction to Quantum Computing 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: Knowledge of linear algebra. Prior knowledge of quantum mechanics is not required although helpful. Introduction to quantum computing. Shor's factoring algorithm, Grover's database search algorithm, the quantum summation algorithm. Relationship between classical and quantum computing. Potential power of quantum computers.


Electrical Engineering - Computer Science


EECS E4340x Computer Hardware Design 3 pts. Lect: 2. Prerequisites: ELEN E3331 plus ELEN E3910 or CSEE W3827. Practical aspects of computer hardware design through the implementation, simulation, and prototyping of a PDP-8 processor. High-level and assembly languages, I/O, interrupts, datapath and control design, piplelining, busses, memory architecture. Programmable logic and hardware prototyping with FPGAs. Fundamentals of VHDL for register-transfer level design. Testing and validation of hardware. Hands-on use of industry CAD tools for simulation and synthesis. Lab required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EECS E4340
EECS
4340
60178
001
TuTh 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
S. Sethumadhavan 24 / 40 [ More Info ]

Computer Science


COMS W4444x Programming and Problem Solving 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W3134, W3136, or W3137 and CSEE W3827. Hands-on introduction to solving open-ended computational problems. Emphasis on creativity, cooperation, and collaboration. Projects spanning a variety of areas within computer science, typically requiring the development of computer programs. Generalization of solutions to broader problems, and specialization of complex problems to make them manageable. Team-oriented projects, student presentations, and in-class participation required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4444
COMS
4444
24122
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
K. Ross 40 / 40 [ More Info ]

COMS W4460y Principles of Innovation and Entrepreneurship 3 pts. Prerequisites: COMS W3134, W3136, or W3137 (or equivalent), or permission of instructor. Team project centered course focused on principles of planning, creating, and growing a technology venture. Topics include: indentifying and analyzing opportunities created by technology paradigm shifts, designing innovative products, protecting intellectual property, engineering innovative business models.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4460
COMS
4460
73439
001
W 4:10p - 6:40p
TBA
Y. Yemini 35 / 35 [ More Info ]

COMS W4560x Introduction to Computer Applications in Health Care and Biomedicine 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: Experience with computers and a passing familiarity with medicine and biology. Undergraduates in their senior or junior years may take this course only if they have adequate backgroud in mathematics and receive permission from the instructor An overview of the field of biomedical informatics, combining perspectives from medicine, computer science and social science. Use of computers and information in health care and the biomedical sciences, covering specific applications and general methods, current issues, capabilities and limitations of biomedical informatics. Biomedical Informatics studies the organization of medical information, the effective management of information using computer technology, and the impact of such technology on medical research, education, and patient care. The field explores techniques for assessing current information practices, determining the information needs of health care providers and patients, developing interventions using computer technology, and evaluating the impact of those interventions.

COMS W4701x or y Artificial Intelligence 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W3134, W3136, or W3137. Provides a broad understanding of the basic techniques for building intelligent computer systems. Topics include state-space problem representations, problem reduction and and-or graphs, game playing and heuristic search, predicate calculus, and resolution theorem proving, AI systems and languages for knowledge representation, machine learning and concept formation and other topics such as natural language processing may be included as time permits.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4701
COMS
4701
75739
001
TuTh 7:10p - 8:25p
TBA
D. Radev 120 / 120 [ More Info ]

COMS W4705x Natural Language Processing 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W3134, W3136, or W3137, or the instructor's permission. Computational approaches to natural language generation and understanding. Recommended preparation: some previous or concurrent exposure to AI or Machine Learning. Topics include information extraction, summarization, machine translation, dialogue systems, and emotional speech. Particular attention is given to robust techniques that can handle understanding and generation for the large amounts of text on the Web or in other large corpora. Programming exercises in several of these areas.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4705
COMS
4705
19576
001
TuTh 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
M. Collins 90 / 90 [ More Info ]

COMS W4725x or y Knowledge Representation and Reasoning 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W4701. General aspects of knowledge representation (KR). The two fundamental paradigms (semantic networks and frames) and illustrative systems. Topics include hybrid systems, time, action/plans, defaults, abduction, and case-based reasoning. Throughout the course particular attention will be paid to design tradeoffs between language expressiveness and reasoning complexity, and issues relating to the use of KR systems in larger applications.

COMS W4731x or y Computer Vision 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: The fundamentals of calculus, linear algebra, and C programming. Students without any of these prerequisites are advised to contact the instructor prior to taking the course. Introductory course in computer vision. Topics include image formation and optics, image sensing, binary images, image processing and filtering, edge extraction and boundary detection, region growing and segmentation, pattern classification methods, brightness and reflectance, shape from shading and photometric stereo, texture, binocular stereo, optical flow and motion, 2-D and 3-D object representation, object recognition, vision systems and applications.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4731
COMS
4731
62548
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
S. Nayar 47 / 60 [ More Info ]

COMS W4733x or y Computational Aspects of Robotics 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W3134, W3136, or W3137. Introduction to robotics from a computer science perspective. Topics include coordinate frames and kinematics, computer architectures for robotics, integration and use of sensors, world modeling systems, design and use of robotic programming languages, and applications of artificial intelligence for planning, assembly, and manipulation.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4733
COMS
4733
25157
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
P. Allen 43 / 60 [ More Info ]

COMS W4735x or y Visual Interfaces to Computers 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W3134, W3136, or W3137. Visual input as data and for control of computer systems. Survey and analysis of architecture, algorithms, and underlying assumptions of commercial and research systems that recognize and interpret human gestures, analyze imagery such as fingerprint or iris patterns, generate natural language descriptions of medical or map imagery. Explores foundations in human psychophysics, cognitive science, and artificial intelligence.

COMS W4737x or y Biometrics 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: A background at the sophomore level in computer science, engineering, or like discipline. Corequisites: None In this course we will explore the latest advances in biometrics as well as the machine learning techniques behind them. Students will learn how these technologies work and how they are sometimes defeated. Grading will be based on homework assignments and a final project. There will be no midterm or final exam. This course shares lectures with COMS E6737. Students taking COMS E6737 are required to complete additional homework problems and undertake a more rigorous final project. Students will only be allowed to earn credit for COMS W4737 or COMS E6737 and not both.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4737
COMS
4737
67013
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
P. Belhumeur 25 / 25 [ More Info ]

Computer Science-Biomedical Engineering-Medical Informatics


CBMF W4761x or y Computational Genomics 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: Introductory probability and statistics and basic programming skills. Provides comprehensive introduction to computational techniques for analyzing genomic data including DNA, RNA and protein structures; microarrays; transcription and regulation; regulatory, metabolic and protein interaction networks. The course covers sequence analysis algorithms, dynamic programming, hidden Markov models, phylogenetic analysis, Bayesian network techniques, neural networks, clustering algorithms, support vector machines, Boolean models of regulatory networks, flux based analysis of metabolic networks and scale-free network models. The course provides self-contained introduction to relevant biological mechanisms and methods.


Computer Science


COMS W4771y Machine Learning 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: Any introductory course in linear algebra and any introductory course in statistics are both required. Highly recommended: COMS W4701 or knowledge of Artificial Intelligence. Topics from generative and discriminative machine learning including least squares methods, support vector machines, kernel methods, neural networks, Gaussian distributions, linear classification, linear regression, maximum likelihood, exponential family distributions, Bayesian networks, Bayesian inference, mixture models, the EM algorithm, graphical models and hidden Markov models. Algorithms implemented in Matlab.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4771
COMS
4771
24384
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
T. Jebara 25 / 150 [ More Info ]

COMS W4772x Advanced Machine Learning 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: COMS W4771 or permission of instructor; knowledge of linear algebra & introductory probability or statistics is required. An exploration of advanced machine learning tools for perception and behavior learning. How can machines perceive, learn from, and classify human activity computationally? Topics include Appearance-Based Models, Principal and Independent Components Analysis, Dimensionality Reduction, Kernel Methods, Manifold Learning, Latent Models, Regression, Classification, Bayesian Methods, Maximum Entropy Methods, Real-Time Tracking, Extended Kalman Filters, Time Series Prediction, Hidden Markov Models, Factorial HMMS, Input-Output HMMs, Markov Random Fields, Variational Methods, Dynamic Bayesian Networks, and Gaussian/Dirichlet Processes. Links to cognitive science.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4772
COMS
4772
26927
001
W 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
D. Hsu 55 / 60 [ More Info ]

Computer Science - Electrical Engineering


CSEE W4823x or y Advanced Logic Design 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: CSEE 3827, or a half semester introduction to digital logic, or the equivalent. An introduction to modern digital system design. Advanced topics in digital logic: controller synthesis (Mealy and Moore machines); adders and multipliers; structured logic blocks (PLDs, PALs, ROMs); iterative circuits. Modern design methodology: register transfer level modelling (RTL); algorithmic state machines (ASMs); introduction to hardware description languages (VHDL or Verilog); system-level modelling and simulation; design examples.

CSEE W4824x Computer Architecture 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: CSEE W3827 or the equivalent. Focuses on advanced topics in computer architecture, illustrated by case studies from classic and modern processors. Fundamentals of quantitative analysis. Pipelining. Memory hierarchy design. Instruction-level and thread-level parallelism. Data-level parallelism and graphics processing units. Multiprocessors. Cache coherence. Interconnection networks. Multi-core processors and systems-on-chip. Platform architectures for embedded, mobile, and cloud computing.


Computer Science


COMS W4901x and y Projects in Computer Science 1-3 pts. Prerequisites: Approval by a faculty member who agrees to supervise the work. A second-level independent project involving laboratory work, computer programming, analytical investigation, or engineering design. May be repeated for credit, but not for a total of more than 3 points of degree credit. Consult the department for section assignment.

COMS W4910x and y Curricular Practical Training 1 pt. Prerequisites: Obtained internship and approval from faculty advisor. Only for MS students in the Computer Science department who need relevant work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. This course may not be taken for pass/fail credit or audited.

COMS W4995x or y Special Topics in Computer Science, I 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: The instructor's permission. Special topics arranged as the need and availability arises. Topics are usually offered on a one-time basis. Since the content of this course changes each time it is offered, it may be repeated for credit. Consult the department for section assignment.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: COMS W4995
COMS
4995
62192
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
R. Geambasu 40 / 40 [ More Info ]
COMS
4995
27568
002
TuTh 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
H. Schulzrinne 16 / 40 [ More Info ]

COMS W4996x or y Special Topics in Computer Science, II 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: The instructor's permission. A continuation of COMS W4995 when the special topic extends over two terms.


Computer Science - Electrical Engineering


CSEE E6868x or y (Section 1) System-on-Chip Platforms 3 pts. Prerequisites: COMS W3157 and CSEE W3827 Design and programming of System-on-Chip (SoC) platforms. Topics include: overview of technology and economic trends, methodologies and supporting CAD tools for system-level design and verification, software simulation and virtual platforms, models of computation, the SystemC language, transaction-level modeling, hardware-software partitioning, high-level synthesis, memory organization, device drivers, on-chip communication architectures, power management and optimization, integration of programmable cores and specialized accelerators. Case studies of modern SoC platforms for various classes of applications.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CSEE E6868
CSEE
6868
72690
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
L. Carloni 30 / 30 [ More Info ]

Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race


CSER W3490x (Section 001) POST 9/11 IMMIGRATION POLICIES 4 pts. STUDENT ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 22 Since September 11, 2001, there has been an avalanche of immigration enforcement policies and initiatives proposed or implemented under the guise of national security. This course will analyze the domino effect of the Patriot Act, the Absconder Initiative, Special Registration, the Real I.D. Act, border security including the building of the 700 mile fence along the U.S./Mexico border, Secured Communities Act-that requires the cooperation of state and local authorities in immigration enforcement, the challenge to birthright citizenship, and now the congressional hearings on Islamic radicalization. Have these policies been effective in combating the war on terrorism and promoting national security? Who stands to benefit from these enforcement strategies? Do immigrant communities feel safer in the U.S.? How have states joined the federal bandwagon of immigration enforcement or created solutions to an inflexible, broken immigration system?

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CSER W3490
CSER
3490
25746
001
Th 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
E. OuYang 22 / 22 [ More Info ]

CSER W3905x ASIAN AMERICAS AND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF RACE 4 pts. This seminar provides an introduction to mental health issues for Asian Americans. In particular, it focuses on the psychology of Asian Americans as racial/ethnic minorities in the United States by exploring a number of key concepts: immigration, racialization, prejudice, family, identity, pathology, and loss. We will examine the development of identity in relation to self, family, college, and society. Quantitative investigation, qualitative research, psychology theories of multiculturalism, and Asian American literature will also be integrated into the course.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CSER W3905
CSER
3905
27328
001
W 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
S. Han 16 / 22 [ More Info ]

CSER W3911x (Section 001) ISSUES IN MODERN NATIVE AMERICAN TRIBAL GOVERNMENT 4-4 pts. The seminar will examine the development of modern tribal governments, the issues they face developing effective tribal institutions, whether the Western form of government imposed on tribes by the Federal government raises inherent conflicts with tribal values and culture, whether the Federal trust status of Indian lands is a benefit or a barrier, the efforts to deliver effective health and educational services on reservations, and an examination of innovative approaches to reservation economic development. The seminar will explore what governance approaches have or have not succeeded and what lessons can be learned from those approaches. Certain of the seminar classes will feature presentations by Indian leaders engaged in innovative governmental or economic initiatives.

CSER W3919x (Section 01) Modes of Inquiry 4 pts. Corequisites: Must register for Lab Session Mondays 2:10-4pm This class, a combination of a seminar and a workshop, will prepare students to conduct, write up and present original research. It has several aims and goals. First, the course introduces students to a variety of ways of thinking about knowledge as well as to specific ways of knowing and making arguments key to humanistic and social science fields. Second, this seminar asks students to think critically about the approaches they employ in pursuing their research. The course will culminate in a semester project, not a fully executed research project, but rather an 8-10 page proposal for research that will articulate a question, provide basic background on the context that this question is situated in, sketch preliminary directions and plot out a detailed methodological plan for answering this question. Students will be strongly encouraged to think of this proposal as related to their thesis or senior project. Over the course of the semester, students will also produce several short exercises to experiment with research techniques and genres of writing. MUST REGISTER FOR LAB SESSION ON MONDAYS AT 2:10-4:00PM. Lab Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CSER W3919
CSER
3919
71377
001
W 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
C. Fennell 16 / 16 [ More Info ]

CSER W3922x Asian American Cinema 4 pts. STUDENT ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 22 seminar focuses on the critical analysis of Asian representation and participation in Hollywood by taking a look at how mainstream American cinema continues to essentialize the Asian and how Asian American filmmakers have responded to Hollywood Orientalist stereotypes. We will analyze various issues confronting the Asian American, including yellowface, white patriarchy, male and female stereotypes, the "model minority" myth, depictions of "Chinatowns," panethnicity, the changing political interpretations of the term Asian American throughout American history, gender and sexuality, and cultural hegemonies and privileging within the Asian community. Global Core.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CSER W3922
CSER
3922
74773
001
Th 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
E. Gamalinda 22 / 22 [ More Info ]

CSER W3923x (Section 001) LATINO AND ASIAN AMERICAN MEMOIR 4 pts. In this class, we will explore Latino and Asian American memoir, focusing on themes of immigration and duality. How do we construct identity and homeland when we are 'multiple'? How do we define ourselves and how do others define us? By reading some of the most challenging and exciting memoirs by Latino and Asian Americans, we will attempt to answer these questions and/or at least try to understand these transnational and multicultural experiences. This class combines the critical with the creative-students have to read and critic memoirs as well as write a final 10page nonfiction creative writing piece. *Students will also have the opportunity to speak to some Latino and Asian authors in class or via SKYPE. Students will be asked to prepare questions in advance for the author-whose work(s) we will have read and discussed. This usually arises interesting and thought-provoking conversations and debates. This 'Dialogue Series' within the class exposes students to a wide-range of voices and offers them a deeper understanding of the complexity of duality.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CSER W3923
CSER
3923
25441
001
M 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
N. Handal 4 / 22 [ More Info ]

CSER W3924y (Section 1) LATIN AMERICAN AND LATINO SOCIAL MOVEMENTS 4 pts. In Latin America, a wave of new popular social movements have been transforming politics and social reality. In the United States, latino/as are building on decades of organizing and demographic growth to claim a new public persona and challenge their marginal status. What are the significant areas of political action, and how can we understand them? What claims can those disenfranchised for reasons of race, class or national origin make on societies? Indigenous survival movements in Brazil, multi-ethnic electoral alliances in Bolivia, growing Afro-Colombian assertion, Dominican community organizing in New York City, and poetic post-marxist guerrillas in Mexico are just a few of the new forms of social activism that are transforming class, ethnic identity and citizenship throughout the Americas, and combating the dominance of free-market social and economic policies. We will discuss a number of important social movements throughout the region, while developing tools for understanding social movements and their possibilities. This class is designed to give you an opportunity to do independent research; as a result, it will demand your intensive engagement, and your willingness both to master the information and tools we go over in class, and to pursue a specific topic of your own choosing. You will all write a term paper based on independent research.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CSER W3924
CSER
3924
69921
001
Tu 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
S. Rockefeller 13 / 22 [ More Info ]

CSER W3926x (Section 1) LATIN MUSIC AND IDENTITY 4 pts. Latin music has had a historically strained relationship with mainstream music tastes, exploding in occasional 'boom' periods, and receding into invisibility in others. What if this were true because it is a space for hybrid construction of identity that directly reflects a mixture of traditions across racial lines in Latin America. This course will investigate Latin music's transgression of binary views of race in Anglo-American society, even as it directly affects the development of pop music in America. From New Orleans jazz to Texas corridos, salsa, rock, and reggaeton, Latin music acts as both as a soundtrack and a structural blueprint for the 21st century's multicultural experiment. There will be a strong focus on studying Latin music's political economy, and investigating the story it tells about migration and globalization.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CSER W3926
CSER
3926
77246
001
Tu 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
E. Morales 22 / 22 [ More Info ]

CSER W3928x and y Colonization/Decolonization 4 pts. Corequisites: CSER W3928 is open only to CSER majors/concentrators. Others may be allowed to register with permission of the instructor. STUDENT ENROLLMENT LIMIT: 22 This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, emphasizing cross-cultural and social contact, exchange, and relations of power; dynamics of conquest and resistance; and discourses of civilization, empire, freedom, nationalism, and human rights, from 1500 to 2000. Topics include pre-modern empires; European exploration, contact, and conquest in the new world; Atlantic-world slavery and emancipation; European and Japanese colonialism in Asia, Africa, the Middle East. The course ends with a section on decolonization and post-colonialism in the period after World War II. Intensive reading and discussion of primary documents. Global Core.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CSER W3928
CSER
3928
72450
001
Tu 9:00a - 10:50a
420 HAMILTON HALL
C. Brown 2 / 22 [ More Info ]

CSER W3990xy SENIOR PROJECT SEMINAR 4 pts. The Senior Paper Colloquium will focus primarily on developing students' ideas for their research projects and discussing their written work. The course is designed to develop and hone the skills necessary to complete the senior paper. Students will receive guidance in researching for and writing and advanced academic paper. Conducted as a seminar, the colloquium provides the students a forum in which to discuss their work with each other. The CSER preceptor, who facilitates the colloquium, will also provide students with additional academic support, supplementary to the advice they receive from their individual faculty sponsors. While most of the course will be devoted to the students' work, during the first weeks of the term, students will read and discuss several ethnic studies-oriented texts to gain insight into the kinds of research projects done in the field.

CSER G4030x (Section 1) Sound: The Sacred, The Secular 3 pts. Currently, there is no course in the ethnomusicology program that explores the relation between sound, the secular, and the sacred. This is largely a reflection of the general trend of the past two decades in the field in which the study of popular music has been privileged. However, historically and today, sound, music, and the acoustic more generally, have been a central arena for the negotiation of the relationship between the sacred and the secular, the definition of the idea of religion and the structure and significance of ritual. Recently, we have seen an intensification of scholarship on the question of religion from the social sciences and the humanities that recasts the question of the relation between the secular and the sacred through critical theory. Yet the acoustical overtones of this critical "turn" to religion have seldom have explored. This course seeks to explore the acoustic dimensions of critically thinking the idea of sound for understanding different aspects of the secular and the sacred. The term sound is used instead of music because in many expressive traditions, the Western concept of music does not necessarily encompass notions of recitation, chant, or other modalities of sound.


Dance


DNCE BC1135x-BC1136y Ballet, I: Beginning 1 pt.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC1135
DNCE
1135
01157
001
MW 9:00a - 10:00a
TBA
M. Carpenter 18 [ More Info ]
DNCE
1135
06272
002
TuTh 9:00a - 10:00a
TBA
A. Benchetrit 3 [ More Info ]
DNCE
1135
05885
003
F 10:00a - 12:00p
TBA
A. Kent 11 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC1137x-BC1138y Ballet, II: Advanced Beginning 1 pt.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC1137
DNCE
1137
07379
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
M. Carpenter 9 [ More Info ]
DNCE
1137
07486
002
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
K. Sullivan 3 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC1247x-BC1248y Jazz, I: Beginning 1 pt. Prerequisites: BC1137, BC1138, BC1332, or BC1333. Intermediate level in modern or ballet technique is required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC1247
DNCE
1247
08164
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
K. King 1 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC1330x-BC1331y Modern, I: Beginning Modern Dance 1 pt. Open to all beginning dancers.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC1330
DNCE
1330
06834
001
MW 9:00a - 10:00a
TBA
K. Wolfangle 4 [ More Info ]
DNCE
1330
06137
002
TuTh 9:00a - 10:00a
TBA
C. Trainor 7 [ More Info ]
DNCE
1330
05002
003
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
C. Trainor 6 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC1332x-BC1333y Modern, II: Advanced Beginning Modern Dance 1 pt.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC1332
DNCE
1332
04577
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
C. Trainor 7 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC1445x-BC1446y Tap, I: Beginning 1 pt. Prerequisites: BC1137, BC1138, BC1332, or BC1333, or permission of the Dance Department. Intermediate level in modern or ballet technique is required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC1446
DNCE
1446
01332
001
MW 5:40p - 6:55p
TBA
M. Morrison 4 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2137x-BC2138y Ballet, III: Intermediate 1 pt.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2137
DNCE
2137
04616
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
K. Glasner 9 [ More Info ]
DNCE
2137
01283
002
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
K. Sullivan 4 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2139x-BC2140y Ballet, IV: High Intermediate 1 pt.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2139
DNCE
2139
03629
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
M. Folkman 3 [ More Info ]
DNCE
2139
02978
002
F 10:00a - 12:00p
TBA
K. Glasner 2 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2143x and y Pointe: Intermediate to Advanced Study of Pointe Work for Ballet Prerequisites: DNCE BC2137 or permission of department. Focuses on developing strength and refinement that is specific to pointe work for the intermediate and advanced ballet dancer. Permission of the instructor required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2143
DNCE
2143
05943
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
C. Anderson 0 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2248x-BC2249y Jazz, II: Intermediate 1 pt. Prerequisites: DNCE BC1247, BC1248 or permission of instructor.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2248
DNCE
2248
07489
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
K. King 2 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2252x and y African Dance I 1 pt. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Concentrates on the dances of West Africa, including Senegal, Mali, and Guinea, and a variety of dances performed at various functions and ceremonies. Explanation of the origin and meaning of each dance will be an integral part of the material presented.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2252
DNCE
2252
02678
001
TuTh 9:30a - 10:30a
TBA
M. Camara 7 [ More Info ]
DNCE
2252
03372
002
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
M. Camara 14 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2253x and y African Dance II 1 pt. Prerequisites: DNCE BC2252 or permission of instructor.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2253
DNCE
2253
04932
001
TuTh 10:30a - 11:30a
TBA
M. Camara 2 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2254x Classical Indian Dance 1 pt. Principles and practices of Bharata Natyam including the adavu movement system, hasta or hand gestures, narrative techniques, or abhanaya, as well as other classical Indian dance forms.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2254
DNCE
2254
07041
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
U. Coorlawala 6 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2255x and y Afro-Cuban Dance: Orisha, Rumba, Salsa 1 pt. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. This class will introduce students to the African-based folkloric and popular dances of Cuba, including Orisha, Rumba, and Salsa. In addition to learning rhythms and dances, these forms will be contextualized within the historical and contemporary significance of Afro-Cuban dance performance.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2255
DNCE
2255
06208
001
F 3:00p - 5:00p
TBA
R. Bliss 8 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2332x-BC2333y Modern, III: Intermediate Modern Dance 1 pt.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2332
DNCE
2332
08565
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
K. Wolfangle 1 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2334x-BC2335y Modern, IV: High Intermediate Modern Dance 1 pt.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2334
DNCE
2334
03016
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
J. Melnick 1 [ More Info ]
DNCE
2334
02110
002
TuTh 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 2 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2447x-BC2447y Tap, II: Intermediate 1 pt. Prerequisites: DNCE BC1445, BC1446, or Permission of instructor.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2447
DNCE
2447
03455
001
MW 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
M. Morrison 5 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2452x and y Pilates for the Dancer 1 pt. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor or DNCE BC1330, BC1331, BC1135, BC1136. Focus on movement practices, primarily for dancers, which introduces the concepts of Joseph Pilates, a seminal figure in creating a method of body conditioning. Learn and practice a repertory of mat work to improve body awareness, strength, flexibility, and dynamic alignment.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2452
DNCE
2452
08615
001
MW 12:00p - 12:55p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 7 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2455x and y Feldenkrais for Dancers 1 pt. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Develops sensory awareness of their individual neuromuscular patterns in this practical method of attaining optimal, efficient movement. Injury prevention/recovery, improved skill acquisition, and increased strength/coordination/flexibility all result from the discovery and release of habitual rigidities. Applicable to all dance styles and activities.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2455
DNCE
2455
04161
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
T. Chandler 2 [ More Info ]
DNCE
2455
05625
002
F 10:00a - 12:00p
TBA
T. Chandler 1 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2501x or y Biomechanics for the Dancer: Theory and Practice 3 pts. Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of dance techniques in ballet or modern. Links conditioning skills, movement therapies, and neuromuscular patterning through the process of building strength, alignment, and awareness in essential musculature needed for foundational work in ballet and modern.

DNCE BC2555x Ensemble Dance Repertory (Modern Dance) 3 pts. Prerequisites: Intermediate level technique and permission of instructor. Study and performance of choreography using three approaches: learning excerpts from the repertory of selected choreographers, analyzing through reconstruction of classic repertory works, and understanding the choreographic process by working in a creation from initial concept to finished dance.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2555
DNCE
2555
04815
001
MW 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
M. Folkman 3 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2562x Movement Analysis 3 pts. Prerequisites: An intermediate or advanced dance technique course or permission of instructor. Limited to 10. Introduction to the theories and methods of movement analysis, focusing on its application to dance performance and research. Through lectures, readings, integrative movement exercises, and observation labs, students will learn to analyze and describe the qualitative aspects of human movement; to notate movement in motif writing; and to refine their ability to move efficiently and expressively.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2562
DNCE
2562
03921
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2563x Composition: Form, Dance/Theater 3 pts. An exploration of choreography that employs text, song, vocal work, narrative and principles of artistic direction in solo and group contexts.

DNCE BC2564x Dance Composition: Content 3 pts. Continued study of choreography as a communicative performing art form. Focuses on the exploration of ideas and meaning. Emphasis is placed on the development of personal style as an expressive medium and unity of style in each work. Group as well as solo compositions will be assigned.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2564
DNCE
2564
03017
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
D. Parker 11 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2570x Dance in New York City 3 pts. Prerequisites: Fee: $175. Study of the cultural roots and historical contexts of specific communities using New York City's dance scene as a laboratory. Students observe the social environments in which various modes of dance works are created while researching the history of dance in New York City. Course includes attendance at weekly events, lecture-demonstrations, and performances.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC2570
DNCE
2570
03542
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
M. Folkman 4 [ More Info ]
DNCE
2570
04251
002
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
K. Glasner 8 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC2575x or y Choreography for the American Musical 3 pts. Prerequisites: Suggested DNCE BC2560, BC2566, BC2570 Explores the history and evolution of American Musical Theater dance, a uniquely American art form, with special focus on the period known as "The Golden Era." Analysis of the genre's most influential choreographers (including Balanchine, de Mille, Robbins), their systems, methodologies and fusion of high and low art on the commerical stages.

DNCE BC3001x Western Theatrical Dance from the Renaissance to the 1960s 3 pts. Focuses on the history of theatre dance forms originating in Europe and America from the Renaissance to the present. Includes reading, writing, viewing, and discussion of sources such as film, text, original documentation, demonstration, and performance.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3001
DNCE
3001
02201
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
L. Garafola 3 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3009x and y Independent Study 1-4 pts.

DNCE BC3138x-BC3139y Ballet, V: Advanced 1 pt.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3138
DNCE
3138
02707
001
MW 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
R. LaFosse 4 [ More Info ]
DNCE
3138
06101
002
TuTh 8:40a - 9:55a
TBA
A. Carmena 4 [ More Info ]
DNCE
3138
00071
003
F 12:30p - 2:30p
TBA
A. Kent 1 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3138x Ballet V: Intermediate Advanced

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3138
DNCE
3138
02707
001
MW 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
R. LaFosse 4 [ More Info ]
DNCE
3138
06101
002
TuTh 8:40a - 9:55a
TBA
A. Carmena 4 [ More Info ]
DNCE
3138
00071
003
F 12:30p - 2:30p
TBA
A. Kent 1 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3140x-BC3141y Ballet, VI: Advanced Ballet with Pointe 1 pt.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3140
DNCE
3140
04089
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
C. Anderson 2 [ More Info ]
DNCE
3140
07997
002
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
A. Tuttle 5 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3142x Classic Variations 1 pt.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3142
DNCE
3142
04067
001
TuTh 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
A. Tuttle 1 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3150x or y Advanced Studio: Ballet or Modern 1 pt. Prerequisites: Permission of Department. May be repeated for credit up to four times.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3150
DNCE
3150
02590
001
TBA K. Glasner 0 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3200x or y Dance in Film 3 pts. Prerequisites: DNCE BC2566, DNCE BC2570, FILM W1001, and permission of instructor. Survey of theatrical dance in the 20th century specific to film production. Five kinds of dance films will be examined: musicals, non-musicals, documentaries, film essays and pure dance recording.

DNCE BC3250x Flamenco and Classical Spanish Dance I 1 pt. Prerequisites: DNCE BC1137, BC1138, BC1332, BC1333, or Permission of instructor. Intermediate level in modern or ballet technique is required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3250
DNCE
3250
02401
001
F 12:00p - 2:00p
TBA
M. Bronson 3 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3332x (Section 1) Modern V: Tharp

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3332
DNCE
3332
07278
001
MW 8:40a - 9:55a
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 5 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3332x (Section 2) Modern V: Gallim

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3332
DNCE
3332
07754
002
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3332x (Section 3) Modern V: Intermediate Advanced

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3332
DNCE
3332
00340
003
F 12:30p - 2:30p
TBA
K. Wolfangle 1 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3334x Improvisation 1 pt. In this course we will investigate techniques from Ruth Zaporah's Action Theater™ work, Viola Spolin's improvisational "games," Bonnie Bainbridge Cohen's Body-Mind Centering®, and layered improvisational prompts created by the instructor and variations suggested by the class. Together we will create our own methods to facilitate relevant performance practices.

DNCE BC3335x-BC3336y Modern, VI: High Advanced Modern Dance 1 pt.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3335
DNCE
3335
03457
001
MW 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
J. Melnick 0 [ More Info ]
DNCE
3335
00297
002
TuTh 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
C. Thomas 2 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3338x and y Contact Improvisation 1 pt. Prerequisites: Limited to twenty people. Examination of the gender-neutral partnering technique that is now common in contemporary dance. Focus is placed on recent improvisatory forms, sensation building, center connection and risk. Emphasis is placed on listening and sensing rather than controlling or leading.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3338
DNCE
3338
05555
001
MW 1:10p - 2:25p
TBA
C. Thomas 4 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3339x and y Advanced Contact Improvisaton 1 pt. Prerequisites: DNCE BC3338 Contact Improvisation. Sophomore standing or permission of instructor required. Examination of this gender-neutral partnering technique further exploring compositional forms as they arise from the practice. Students will also investigate a variety of set repertory dance texts that have originated from contact improvised material.

DNCE BC3447x-BC3448y Tap, III: Advanced Tap Dance 1 pt. Prerequisites: DNCE BC2447, BC2448, or permission of instructor.

DNCE BC3566 Composition: Site Specific and Experimental Methods 3 pts. Focuses on collaborative creation as conceptual artists, choreographers, improvisers, and performers with an emphasis on site-specific projects and experimental methods.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3566
DNCE
3566
05801
001
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 4 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3567x or y Dance of India 3 pts. A range of dance genres, from the traditional to the innovative, co-exist as representations of "Indianness" in India, and beyond. Identities onstage and in films, morph as colonial, national, and global contexts change. This course zooms from micro to macro views of twentieth century staged dances as culturally inflected discourse. We review how Indian classical dance aligns with the oldest of performance texts, and with lively discourses (rasa as a performance aesthetic, Orientalism, nationalism, global recirculations) through the ages, not only in India but also in Europe, Britain and America. Throughout the course, we ask:- How is culture embodied? How do historical texts configure dance today? How might they affect our thinking on mind-body, practice-theory, and traditional-contemporary divides? How does bodily patterning influence the ways that we experience our surroundings and vice versa? Can cultural imaginaries instigate action? How is gender is performed? What are dance discourses?

DNCE BC3570x or y Latin American and Caribbean Dance: Identities in Motion 3 pts. Examines the history and choreographic features of Latin American and Caribbean dance forms. Dances are analyzed in order to uncover the ways in which dancing shapes national, racial, and gender identities. Focuses on the globalization of these dances in New York City.

DNCE BC3574x Inventing the Contemporary: Dance Since the 1960s 3 pts. Explores modern/contemporary dance in the United States and Europe since the 1960's. Major units are devoted to the Judson Dance Theater and its postmodernist aftermath, Tanztheater and European dance revisionism, and African-American dance and the articulation of an aesthetic of cultural hybridity.

DNCE BC3576x Dance Criticism 3 pts. Intensive practice in writing about dance. Readings drawn from 19th- and 20th-century criticism. Observation includes weekly performances and classroom videotape sessions.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3576
DNCE
3576
07302
001
Th 12:00p - 1:50p
TBA
S. Burke 4 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3578x Traditions of African-American Dance 3 pts. Traces the development of African-American dance, emphasizing the contribution of black artists and the influence of black traditions on American theatrical dance. Major themes include the emergence of African-American concert dance, the transfer of vernacular forms to the concert stage, and issues of appropriation, cultural self-identification, and artistic hybridity.

DNCE BC3580 History of Social Dancing: Dance Crazes from the Waltz to Flash Mobs 3 pts. The history of social dancing from the Renaissance to the present: waltz, contradances, ragtime, jazz, disco. Topics include dance "manias"; youth and anti-dance movements; intersections between the ballroom, stage, and film; competitive, exhibition, and "flash mob" dancing. Lectures based on archival sources, film, literature, music, images, and live performances.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3580
DNCE
3580
02773
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
S. Williams 1 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3591x Senior Seminar in Dance 4 pts. Research and scholarly writing in chosen topics relating to dance. Methods of investigation are drawn from prominent archival collections and personal interviews, as well as other resources. Papers are formally presented to the Dance Department upon completion.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: DNCE BC3591
DNCE
3591
06152
001
Th 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
L. Garafola 1 [ More Info ]

DNCE BC3592x or y Senior Project: Research for Dance 4 pts. Independent study for research and writing (35 to 50-page thesis required).

DNCE BC3593x or y Senior Project: Repertory for Dance 3 pts. Independent study for preparing and performing repertory works in production to be presented in concert.

DNCE BC3981x Inventing American Modern Dance: Ruth St. Denis and Ted Shawn 4 pts. Prerequisites: An introductory dance or theater history course or permission of the instructor. The life, writings, and dances of Ruth St. Denis and Ted Shawn, focusing on their pioneering role in the development of American modern dance and their radical stagings of race, class, gender, and sexuality.

DNCE BC3982x or y Diaghilev's Ballets Russes and Its World 3 pts. Prerequisites: Introductory course in dance, music, theatre history, 20th century art history or permission of instructor. Examines the multifaceted revolution of Serge Diaghilev's Ballets Russes and its impact on dance, music, theatre, and visual arts in the opening decades of the 20th century. Outstanding works such as Petrouchka, The Rite of Spring, Parade, Les Noces, and Prodigal Son, studied in depth, with an emphasis on artistic collaboration and the remaking of traditional dance language.


Earth & Enviornmental Engineering


EAEE E2002x (Section 001) Alternative energy resources 3 pts. Lect: 3. Unconventional, alternative energy resources. Technological options and their role in the world energy markets. Comparison of conventional and unconventional, renewable and non-renewable energy resources and analysis of the consequences of various technological choices and constraints. Economic considerations, energy availability, and the environmental consequences of large-scale, widespread use of each particular technology. Introduction to carbon dioxide capture and carbon dioxide disposal as a means of sustaining the fossil fuel option.

EAEE E3103x Energy, minerals and materials systems 3 pts. Lect: 3. Prerequisites: MSAE E3111 or MECE E3301 and ENME E3161 or MECE E3100 or equiv Corequisites: MSAE E3111 or MECE E3301 and ENME E3161 or MECE E3100 or the equiv Overview of energy resources, resource management from extraction and processing to recycling and final disposal of wastes. Resources availability and resource processing in the context of the global natural and anthropogenic material cycles; thermodynamic and chemical conditions including nonequilibrium effects that shape the resource base; extractive technologies and their impact on the environment and the biogeochemical cycles; chemical extraction from mineral ores, and metallurgical processes for extraction of metals. In analogy to metallurgical processing, power generation and the refining of fuels are treated as extraction and refining processes. Large scale of power generation and a discussion of its impact on the global biogeochemical cycles.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EAEE E3103
EAEE
3103
10988
001
TuTh 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA
A. Park
T. Yegulalp
16 [ More Info ]

EAEE E3801x Earth and environmental engineering laboratory II 2 pts. Lect: 1. Lab: 3. Prerequisites: EAEE E3800 Corequisites: EAEE E4003 A continuation of EAEE E3800, with emphasis on the principles underlying water analysis for inorganic, organic, and bacterial contaminants. Lab Required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EAEE E3801
EAEE
3801
69204
001
Th 10:10a - 11:25a
TBA
P. Duby 9 [ More Info ]

EAEE E4001x Industrial ecology of earth resources 3 pts. Lect: 3. Industrial ecology examines how to reconfigure industrial activities so as to minimize the adverse environmental and material resource effects on the planet. Engineering applications of methodology of industrial ecology in the analysis of current processes and products and the selection or design of environmentally superior alternatives. Home assignments of illustrative quantitative problems.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: EAEE E4001
EAEE
4001
66530
001