Bookshelf

Gaugin's son
Paul Gaugin’s Son: The Life and Times of Emile Gaugin by Francis Butterworth ’57 and David McIntyre. Butterworth, formerly a professor of genetics and molecular biology, provides a comprehensive account of a son living in the shadow of his famous artist father (Saugus Books, $39.50).


Misfire: The Tragic Failure of the M16 in Vietnam by Bob Orkand ’58 and Lyman Duryea. Orkand, a retired Army lieutenant colonel, combines insider knowledge of weapons development with firsthand combat experience to tell the story of the oft-malfunctioning firearm that was rushed into troops’ hands in 1965 (Stackpole Books, $29.95).

Artistic Collaboration Today: Profiles of Creative Teams in Diverse Media by Victor M. Cassidy ’62. A report on more than 40 collaborating sculptors, painters, printmakers, photographers, architects and performers who have worked in tandem with other artists (McFarland, $45).

Semmelweis, The Women’s Doctor by Anthony Valerio ’62. The life and work of pioneering feminist physician Ignaz P. Semmelweis, known as “the Father of Antisepsis,” who discovered the causes and means of prevention of childbed fever (Amazon Digital Services, $9.99).

The Last Days of Paul Rimbaud by Thomas C. Lewis ’63. The last novel in a trilogy about Rimbaud, a Vietnam veteran who has buried his memories of the war (340 Press, $19.95).

Book cover

Big Cabin by Ron Padgett ’64. A new collection of poems about mortality, consciousness and time, written over three seasons in a Vermont cabin (Coffee House Press, $16.95).

Learning to See, and Other Stories and Memoirs from Senegal by Gary Engelberg ’65. Engelberg, a co-founder of Africa Consultants International, an NGO that promotes cross-cultural communication, health and social justice, has lived in Senegal,
West Africa, for more than 50 years (BookBaby, $25.19).

The Complete Poetry of Giacomo da Lentini translation and notes by Richard Lansing ’65. The first translation of the complete poetry of da Lentini, the first major Italian lyric poet, and the inventor of the sonnet (University of Toronto Press, $24.95).

You Say You Want a Revolution: SDS, PL, and Adventures in Building a Worker-Student Alliance edited by John F. Levin ’65 and Earl Silbar. Former members of the Worker-Student Alliance recount and evaluate their participation in the struggles of the 1960s and early 1970s (1741 Press, $18.95).

Turkey Shoot by Geoffrey Dutton ’66. Dutton’s debut novel is an international conspiracy thriller set in Greece and Turkey in fall 2015, as a young Iraqi refugee
takes part in a terrorist mission (Perfidy Press, $15.99).

Entrenchment: Wealth, Power, and the Constitution of Democratic Societies by Paul Starr ’70. Pulitzer Prize-winner Starr describes politics today as a struggle over entrenchment — efforts to bring about change in ways that opponents will find difficult to undo (Yale University Press, $28.50).

Book cover

The Next Republic: The Rise of a New Radical Majority by D.D. Guttenplan ’78. Guttenplan, a national political correspondent, profiles nine activists who are changing the course of American history (Seven Stories Press, $23.95).

A Rosenberg by Any Other Name: A History of Jewish Name Changing in America by Kirsten Fermaglich ’92. This first history of name changing offers a window into American Jewish life throughout the 20th century (New York University Press, $28).

Handbook of Student Engagement Interventions: Working with Disengaged Youth edited by Jennifer A. Fredericks ’92, Amy L. Reschly and Sandra L. Christenson. The authors pull together the current research on engagement in schools and empower readers to implement interventions (Academic Press, $87.58).

Book cover

The Daughters of Temperance Hobbs: A Novel by Katherine Howe ’99. A New England history professor must race against time to free her family from a curse (Henry Holt and Co., $28).

Book cover

The Obsoletes: A Novel by Simeon Mills ’00. Mills’s debut follows two teenage brothers as they navigate high school while hiding a secret: They’re actually robots (Skybound Books, $26).

Book cover

Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World by David Epstein ’02. A New York Times bestseller that makes a case for breadth and late starts (Riverhead Books, $28).

An October to Remember 1968: The Tigers-Cardinals World Series as Told By the Men Who Played in It by Brendan Donley ’15. Donley traveled the country to gather the accounts of the remaining players of the famed Tigers and Cardinals teams (Sports Publishing, $24.41).

Trillion Dollar Coach: The Leadership Playbook of Silicon Valley’s Bill Campbell by Eric Schmidt, Jonathan Rosenberg and Alan Eagle. Management lessons from legendary football coach and business executive Bill Campbell ’62, TC’64 (HarperBusiness, $28.99).

Jill C. Shomer

Columbia College Authors!

Please send us your latest book, to be included in an upcoming issue. We welcome new or recently published books by College alumni, faculty and students as well as books about the College and its people. Please send early-stage copies, with a press release, as promptly as possible to:

Bookshelf Editor
Columbia College Today
Columbia Alumni Center
622 W. 113th St., MC 4530, 4th Fl.
New York, NY 10025

Please be patient — we receive a great many submissions and your book may not appear for several issues. We also advise that alumni send an update about the book (and themselves) to their Class Notes correspondent so as to gain additional publication coverage.